itssammate
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Hey,

I've been doing mocks and I've been getting B's but I'm not sure on how to lock down that A/A*, I usually write three chunky paragraphs for the answer to the sunlight on the grass anthology, and dependant on the question, I would discuss Language structure and writers' intentions in each paragraph three times, is this the right way to go about answering a Lit question?

Thanks
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Vav Sartrean Po
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Hi,
I also have English lit exams next week (exciting right) but I've been getting straight A* with my new writing method. Try not to over complicate things, analyse the quote and answer the question. Relate everything to context for of mice and men, I can also write my method if you would like that. Good luck
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itssammate
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(Original post by Marshall Taylor)
Hi,
I also have English lit exams next week (exciting right) but I've been getting straight A* with my new writing method. Try not to over complicate things, analyse the quote and answer the question. Relate everything to context for of mice and men, I can also write my method if you would like that. Good luck
Hey Marshall, could you please write your method? I would love it especially if you've been getting consistent A*s, thanks <3
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Rit101
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(Original post by Marshall Taylor)
Hi,
I also have English lit exams next week (exciting right) but I've been getting straight A* with my new writing method. Try not to over complicate things, analyse the quote and answer the question. Relate everything to context for of mice and men, I can also write my method if you would like that. Good luck
Hey man, what is your writing method mate? I could really use it! Thanks
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Ash Kay
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(Original post by Marshall Taylor)
Hi,
I also have English lit exams next week (exciting right) but I've been getting straight A* with my new writing method. Try not to over complicate things, analyse the quote and answer the question. Relate everything to context for of mice and men, I can also write my method if you would like that. Good luck
Hi, do you have any notes for OMAM?
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Vav Sartrean Po
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Hi all,

My method is as following:

Planning
1. Identify 3-5 different answers to the question (which form their point)
2. Note down atlas two quotes that proves that the points are correct
3. Know around the quotes quickly, note down aspects of explanation (if you already have planned quotes and a* analysis then you can easily paste that in)

Paragraph Structure: PEE

Point: The answer
Evidence: A quotation or reference to the text with supports your point
Explanation: Explains how the whole quote shows you are correct: The above 3 will get you a C grade. You'll need to add the following into your explanation to go higher:
-Focuses on the importance of individual words in the quote (word zoom)
-Offers alternative intrepretations (however, alternatively..)
-Links the point to the whole text
- Relates to context/alternative views of different audiences
-Evaluate: why has the author included this? Is this important and why?

Thats it pretty much, also relate to structure but only in lets say one paragraph but I often don't. Now I'll post an example of a OMAM A* paragraph, it may not make much sense because it is an extract question answer but you should see where I have followed this method.

In bold is one of the method steps, i.e the point. In italic is my explanation of why I chose to write that, it will be in brackets also.

How does Steinbeck make this such a powerful moment in the novel?

Firstly, Steinbeck makes this such a powerful moment in the novel by expressing George’s nerves leading up to Lennie’s death (This is makes me sound more intelligent rather than, Steinbeck makes this powerful through his use of adjectives). The quotation,’George raised the gun and his hand shook, and he dropped his hand to the ground again,’ suggests that George is struggling to end the life of his best friend and only companion during a very independent 1930s America(Linking to context right at the start of my explanation). This makes this moment very powerful as we see the emotional side of George, which is often hidden by his imperative commands such as “look acrost’(Embedding quotes, a high grade technique). The word,’shook’(Wood zoom) has connotations of hands shaking which symbolise friendship, however it could also be representing the partnership of two life friends perhaps because their journey has been ‘shook’(Homonym) many times yet they still are together. Alternatively, George could be shaking because he knows that by shooting Lennie, he will end Lennie’s dream of rabbits but also his dream of owning his own ranch. This reflects onto the whole extract as we see Lennie wanting to be told the American dream, “Go on, tell how it’s gonna be” which informs the reader that Lennie’s life would only be a failed dream, just like the rest of the 1930s migrant workers. During 1930s America, many migrant workers would of been on their own, trying to provide for their family. When George ‘raised the gun’ he realised that he would now become the stereotypical migrant worker, his uniqueness which kept him and Lennie going for so long would inevitably come to an end. One audience would sympathise for the powerful decision that George is making to save Lennie from a more prolonged death, however another audience could interpret dropping the gun as a symbol that George wants to complete the image of the American dream in Lennie’s mind before ending his life. Steinbeck could be suggesting that this moment is very powerful due to the general reminder of the journey George and Lennie have been on which was run off the ever so powerful American dream.

I hope this helped
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Ash Kay
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#7
(Original post by Marshall Taylor)
Hi all,

My method is as following:

Planning
1. Identify 3-5 different answers to the question (which form their point)
2. Note down atlas two quotes that proves that the points are correct
3. Know around the quotes quickly, note down aspects of explanation (if you already have planned quotes and a* analysis then you can easily paste that in)

Paragraph Structure: PEE

Point: The answer
Evidence: A quotation or reference to the text with supports your point
Explanation: Explains how the whole quote shows you are correct: The above 3 will get you a C grade. You'll need to add the following into your explanation to go higher:
-Focuses on the importance of individual words in the quote (word zoom)
-Offers alternative intrepretations (however, alternatively..)
-Links the point to the whole text
- Relates to context/alternative views of different audiences
-Evaluate: why has the author included this? Is this important and why?

Thats it pretty much, also relate to structure but only in lets say one paragraph but I often don't. Now I'll post an example of a OMAM A* paragraph, it may not make much sense because it is an extract question answer but you should see where I have followed this method.

In bold is one of the method steps, i.e the point. In italic is my explanation of why I chose to write that, it will be in brackets also.

How does Steinbeck make this such a powerful moment in the novel?
Thank you
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itssammate
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#8
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Marshall Taylor)
Hi all,

My method is as following:

Planning
1. Identify 3-5 different answers to the question (which form their point)
2. Note down atlas two quotes that proves that the points are correct
3. Know around the quotes quickly, note down aspects of explanation (if you already have planned quotes and a* analysis then you can easily paste that in)

Paragraph Structure: PEE

Point: The answer
Evidence: A quotation or reference to the text with supports your point
Explanation: Explains how the whole quote shows you are correct: The above 3 will get you a C grade. You'll need to add the following into your explanation to go higher:
-Focuses on the importance of individual words in the quote (word zoom)
-Offers alternative intrepretations (however, alternatively..)
-Links the point to the whole text
- Relates to context/alternative views of different audiences
-Evaluate: why has the author included this? Is this important and why?

Thats it pretty much, also relate to structure but only in lets say one paragraph but I often don't. Now I'll post an example of a OMAM A* paragraph, it may not make much sense because it is an extract question answer but you should see where I have followed this method.

In bold is one of the method steps, i.e the point. In italic is my explanation of why I chose to write that, it will be in brackets also.

How does Steinbeck make this such a powerful moment in the novel?

Firstly, Steinbeck makes this such a powerful moment in the novel by expressing George’s nerves leading up to Lennie’s death (This is makes me sound more intelligent rather than, Steinbeck makes this powerful through his use of adjectives). The quotation,’George raised the gun and his hand shook, and he dropped his hand to the ground again,’ suggests that George is struggling to end the life of his best friend and only companion during a very independent 1930s America(Linking to context right at the start of my explanation). This makes this moment very powerful as we see the emotional side of George, which is often hidden by his imperative commands such as “look acrost’(Embedding quotes, a high grade technique). The word,’shook’(Wood zoom) has connotations of hands shaking which symbolise friendship, however it could also be representing the partnership of two life friends perhaps because their journey has been ‘shook’(Homonym) many times yet they still are together. Alternatively, George could be shaking because he knows that by shooting Lennie, he will end Lennie’s dream of rabbits but also his dream of owning his own ranch. This reflects onto the whole extract as we see Lennie wanting to be told the American dream, “Go on, tell how it’s gonna be” which informs the reader that Lennie’s life would only be a failed dream, just like the rest of the 1930s migrant workers. During 1930s America, many migrant workers would of been on their own, trying to provide for their family. When George ‘raised the gun’ he realised that he would now become the stereotypical migrant worker, his uniqueness which kept him and Lennie going for so long would inevitably come to an end. One audience would sympathise for the powerful decision that George is making to save Lennie from a more prolonged death, however another audience could interpret dropping the gun as a symbol that George wants to complete the image of the American dream in Lennie’s mind before ending his life. Steinbeck could be suggesting that this moment is very powerful due to the general reminder of the journey George and Lennie have been on which was run off the ever so powerful American dream.

I hope this helped
You are an amazing person, seriously, thank you
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Vav Sartrean Po
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#9
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OCR exam was hard, no dialogue in either question - BS
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Ash Kay
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#10
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Edexcel exam.... Just did it
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