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    Pleeeease help! It would be EXTREMELY APPRECIATED.

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    (Original post by FatimaHere)
    Pleeeease help! It would be EXTREMELY APPRECIATED.

    Slim is a significant character in Of Mice and Men. He juxtaposes the usual interpretation of a Migrant Worker in 1930s America, he also presents many of the themes such as prejudice, and friendship.

    When we are first introduced to Slim, he is described as the 'prince of the ranch', suggesting that he has great power. This idea is reinforced by Steinbeck when we are informed that he 'don't need to wear no high heeled boots', which shows that unlike Curley, Slim naturally has the respect of the other migrant workers on the ranch. This links to the American Dream, as although Slim might not have his own land, he is the natural leader of all the other workers on the ranch, possibly including Curley.

    Additionally, Slim is important in the Novella in revealing information about George and Lennie's past in Weed. George immeditly trusts him enough to know he 'wouldn't tell' without Slim saying anything, indicating to the reader that Slim is easy to talk to. Slim repeats the words 'He ain't mean' which shows the reader that all of the bad things Lennie did in Weed wasn't to be 'mean', but it was because he was scared. The conversation is very important, as it informs the reader about the 'red girl' in Weed. If the conversation had not happened, the reader would not know about it, and wouldn't be able to make the link that the same thing happens to Curley's Wife later in the novella.

    As well as this, Slim is significant in the novella because he juxtaposes all of the other characters feelings about prejudice. At no point in the novella is Slim nasty in anyway to Crooks, or Curley's Wife. While the other workers call Curley's Wife a 'tart' and '*****', Slim gives her the attention she desperately craves by calling her 'good lookin' - a friendly statement, but not a flirting one. Additionally, he never shows any prejudice to Crooks, in fact he is the only character which Crooks trusts. The fact that Slim shows no prejudice indicates to the reader that not all migrant workers in 1930's America were prejudiced towards black and female Americans.

    Furthermore, Slim is significant in the novella because he presents the theme of leadership to the reader. In all of the important decisions in the novella, Slim is there and all the characters look to him to make the decisions because, 'Slim's opinion was law'. For example, in the shooting of Candy's dog, Slim makes the final decision that it should be shot. However, he is not nasty to Candy as he offers him one of his 'pups' if he 'wanted to'. As well as this, after Curley's fight with Lennie, Slim takes control and tells Curley his hand 'got caught in a machine', forcing him to lye to save Lennie. This juxtaposes the idea the all migrant workers had to follow the orders given to them by their superiors, and shows that Slim is a natural leader.

    Moreover, Slim is significant in revealing the theme of friendship in the novella. Throughout the story, Slim develops a good friendship with George. This is important as without Slim, perhaps George might not have killed Lennie, as he would have been alone. After George has killed Lennie, Slim is the only character to understand his emotion be repeating 'you hadda' to him, in an attempt to comfort him. In contrast to this, Carlson and Curley has not idea 'whats eatin' George, which links to the idea that all migrant workers in 1930's America were lonely, and had very little emotion. Slim is important in revealing that this is not the case.

    Overall, Slim is significant in Of Mice and Men because shows no prejudice, develops a friendship with George (which could have been what caused George to kill Lennie), and he is a natural leader.

    Hope this helps! I am also taking the exam on Monday. I really hope Slim does come up.
    -KingCadee
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    (Original post by kingcadee)

    Slim is a significant character in Of Mice and Men. He juxtaposes the usual interpretation of a Migrant Worker in 1930s America, he also presents many of the themes such as prejudice, and friendship.

    When we are first introduced to Slim, he is described as the 'prince of the ranch', suggesting that he has great power. This idea is reinforced by Steinbeck when we are informed that he 'don't need to wear no high heeled boots', which shows that unlike Curley, Slim naturally has the respect of the other migrant workers on the ranch. This links to the American Dream, as although Slim might not have his own land, he is the natural leader of all the other workers on the ranch, possibly including Curley.

    Additionally, Slim is important in the Novella in revealing information about George and Lennie's past in Weed. George immeditly trusts him enough to know he 'wouldn't tell' without Slim saying anything, indicating to the reader that Slim is easy to talk to. Slim repeats the words 'He ain't mean' which shows the reader that all of the bad things Lennie did in Weed wasn't to be 'mean', but it was because he was scared. The conversation is very important, as it informs the reader about the 'red girl' in Weed. If the conversation had not happened, the reader would not know about it, and wouldn't be able to make the link that the same thing happens to Curley's Wife later in the novella.

    As well as this, Slim is significant in the novella because he juxtaposes all of the other characters feelings about prejudice. At no point in the novella is Slim nasty in anyway to Crooks, or Curley's Wife. While the other workers call Curley's Wife a 'tart' and '*****', Slim gives her the attention she desperately craves by calling her 'good lookin' - a friendly statement, but not a flirting one. Additionally, he never shows any prejudice to Crooks, in fact he is the only character which Crooks trusts. The fact that Slim shows no prejudice indicates to the reader that not all migrant workers in 1930's America were prejudiced towards black and female Americans.

    Furthermore, Slim is significant in the novella because he presents the theme of leadership to the reader. In all of the important decisions in the novella, Slim is there and all the characters look to him to make the decisions because, 'Slim's opinion was law'. For example, in the shooting of Candy's dog, Slim makes the final decision that it should be shot. However, he is not nasty to Candy as he offers him one of his 'pups' if he 'wanted to'. As well as this, after Curley's fight with Lennie, Slim takes control and tells Curley his hand 'got caught in a machine', forcing him to lye to save Lennie. This juxtaposes the idea the all migrant workers had to follow the orders given to them by their superiors, and shows that Slim is a natural leader.

    Moreover, Slim is significant in revealing the theme of friendship in the novella. Throughout the story, Slim develops a good friendship with George. This is important as without Slim, perhaps George might not have killed Lennie, as he would have been alone. After George has killed Lennie, Slim is the only character to understand his emotion be repeating 'you hadda' to him, in an attempt to comfort him. In contrast to this, Carlson and Curley has not idea 'whats eatin' George, which links to the idea that all migrant workers in 1930's America were lonely, and had very little emotion. Slim is important in revealing that this is not the case.

    Overall, Slim is significant in Of Mice and Men because shows no prejudice, develops a friendship with George (which could have been what caused George to kill Lennie), and he is a natural leader.

    Hope this helps! I am also taking the exam on Monday. I really hope Slim does come up.
    -KingCadee
    people are saying it will be culey or candy or the setting who told u it would be slim I have hope it is
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    (Original post by kingcadee)

    Slim is a significant character in Of Mice and Men. He juxtaposes the usual interpretation of a Migrant Worker in 1930s America, he also presents many of the themes such as prejudice, and friendship.

    When we are first introduced to Slim, he is described as the 'prince of the ranch', suggesting that he has great power. This idea is reinforced by Steinbeck when we are informed that he 'don't need to wear no high heeled boots', which shows that unlike Curley, Slim naturally has the respect of the other migrant workers on the ranch. This links to the American Dream, as although Slim might not have his own land, he is the natural leader of all the other workers on the ranch, possibly including Curley.

    Additionally, Slim is important in the Novella in revealing information about George and Lennie's past in Weed. George immeditly trusts him enough to know he 'wouldn't tell' without Slim saying anything, indicating to the reader that Slim is easy to talk to. Slim repeats the words 'He ain't mean' which shows the reader that all of the bad things Lennie did in Weed wasn't to be 'mean', but it was because he was scared. The conversation is very important, as it informs the reader about the 'red girl' in Weed. If the conversation had not happened, the reader would not know about it, and wouldn't be able to make the link that the same thing happens to Curley's Wife later in the novella.

    As well as this, Slim is significant in the novella because he juxtaposes all of the other characters feelings about prejudice. At no point in the novella is Slim nasty in anyway to Crooks, or Curley's Wife. While the other workers call Curley's Wife a 'tart' and '*****', Slim gives her the attention she desperately craves by calling her 'good lookin' - a friendly statement, but not a flirting one. Additionally, he never shows any prejudice to Crooks, in fact he is the only character which Crooks trusts. The fact that Slim shows no prejudice indicates to the reader that not all migrant workers in 1930's America were prejudiced towards black and female Americans.

    Furthermore, Slim is significant in the novella because he presents the theme of leadership to the reader. In all of the important decisions in the novella, Slim is there and all the characters look to him to make the decisions because, 'Slim's opinion was law'. For example, in the shooting of Candy's dog, Slim makes the final decision that it should be shot. However, he is not nasty to Candy as he offers him one of his 'pups' if he 'wanted to'. As well as this, after Curley's fight with Lennie, Slim takes control and tells Curley his hand 'got caught in a machine', forcing him to lye to save Lennie. This juxtaposes the idea the all migrant workers had to follow the orders given to them by their superiors, and shows that Slim is a natural leader.

    Moreover, Slim is significant in revealing the theme of friendship in the novella. Throughout the story, Slim develops a good friendship with George. This is important as without Slim, perhaps George might not have killed Lennie, as he would have been alone. After George has killed Lennie, Slim is the only character to understand his emotion be repeating 'you hadda' to him, in an attempt to comfort him. In contrast to this, Carlson and Curley has not idea 'whats eatin' George, which links to the idea that all migrant workers in 1930's America were lonely, and had very little emotion. Slim is important in revealing that this is not the case.

    Overall, Slim is significant in Of Mice and Men because shows no prejudice, develops a friendship with George (which could have been what caused George to kill Lennie), and he is a natural leader.

    Hope this helps! I am also taking the exam on Monday. I really hope Slim does come up.
    -KingCadee

    this is so helpfl thanks x
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    (Original post by brithday)
    people are saying it will be culey or candy or the setting who told u it would be slim I have hope it is
    He has never come up before
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    slim came up in 2013
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    (Original post by brithday)
    slim came up in 2013
    For edexcel HT prose?
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    for for aqa sorry I thought u were doing this exam
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    (Original post by kingcadee)
    slim is a significant character in of mice and men. He juxtaposes the usual interpretation of a migrant worker in 1930s america, he also presents many of the themes such as prejudice, and friendship.

    when we are first introduced to slim, he is described as the 'prince of the ranch', suggesting that he has great power. This idea is reinforced by steinbeck when we are informed that he 'don't need to wear no high heeled boots', which shows that unlike curley, slim naturally has the respect of the other migrant workers on the ranch. This links to the american dream, as although slim might not have his own land, he is the natural leader of all the other workers on the ranch, possibly including curley.

    additionally, slim is important in the novella in revealing information about george and lennie's past in weed. George immeditly trusts him enough to know he 'wouldn't tell' without slim saying anything, indicating to the reader that slim is easy to talk to. Slim repeats the words 'he ain't mean' which shows the reader that all of the bad things lennie did in weed wasn't to be 'mean', but it was because he was scared. The conversation is very important, as it informs the reader about the 'red girl' in weed. If the conversation had not happened, the reader would not know about it, and wouldn't be able to make the link that the same thing happens to curley's wife later in the novella.

    as well as this, slim is significant in the novella because he juxtaposes all of the other characters feelings about prejudice. At no point in the novella is slim nasty in anyway to crooks, or curley's wife. While the other workers call curley's wife a 'tart' and '*****', slim gives her the attention she desperately craves by calling her 'good lookin' - a friendly statement, but not a flirting one. Additionally, he never shows any prejudice to crooks, in fact he is the only character which crooks trusts. The fact that slim shows no prejudice indicates to the reader that not all migrant workers in 1930's america were prejudiced towards black and female americans.

    furthermore, slim is significant in the novella because he presents the theme of leadership to the reader. In all of the important decisions in the novella, slim is there and all the characters look to him to make the decisions because, 'slim's opinion was law'. For example, in the shooting of candy's dog, slim makes the final decision that it should be shot. However, he is not nasty to candy as he offers him one of his 'pups' if he 'wanted to'. As well as this, after curley's fight with lennie, slim takes control and tells curley his hand 'got caught in a machine', forcing him to lye to save lennie. This juxtaposes the idea the all migrant workers had to follow the orders given to them by their superiors, and shows that slim is a natural leader.

    moreover, slim is significant in revealing the theme of friendship in the novella. Throughout the story, slim develops a good friendship with george. This is important as without slim, perhaps george might not have killed lennie, as he would have been alone. After george has killed lennie, slim is the only character to understand his emotion be repeating 'you hadda' to him, in an attempt to comfort him. In contrast to this, carlson and curley has not idea 'whats eatin' george, which links to the idea that all migrant workers in 1930's america were lonely, and had very little emotion. Slim is important in revealing that this is not the case.

    overall, slim is significant in of mice and men because shows no prejudice, develops a friendship with george (which could have been what caused george to kill lennie), and he is a natural leader.

    hope this helps! I am also taking the exam on monday. I really hope slim does come up.
    -kingcadee

    Thank you sooooooo much, you are an incredible being and I hope you excel in everything you do! thank you. Especially the exam on monday ))))
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    im wjec?
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    How do you know this is an A*? Has it been marked?
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    (Original post by kingcadee)
    Slim is a significant character in Of Mice and Men. He juxtaposes the usual interpretation of a Migrant Worker in 1930s America, he also presents many of the themes such as prejudice, and friendship.

    When we are first introduced to Slim, he is described as the 'prince of the ranch', suggesting that he has great power. This idea is reinforced by Steinbeck when we are informed that he 'don't need to wear no high heeled boots', which shows that unlike Curley, Slim naturally has the respect of the other migrant workers on the ranch. This links to the American Dream, as although Slim might not have his own land, he is the natural leader of all the other workers on the ranch, possibly including Curley.

    Additionally, Slim is important in the Novella in revealing information about George and Lennie's past in Weed. George immeditly trusts him enough to know he 'wouldn't tell' without Slim saying anything, indicating to the reader that Slim is easy to talk to. Slim repeats the words 'He ain't mean' which shows the reader that all of the bad things Lennie did in Weed wasn't to be 'mean', but it was because he was scared. The conversation is very important, as it informs the reader about the 'red girl' in Weed. If the conversation had not happened, the reader would not know about it, and wouldn't be able to make the link that the same thing happens to Curley's Wife later in the novella.

    As well as this, Slim is significant in the novella because he juxtaposes all of the other characters feelings about prejudice. At no point in the novella is Slim nasty in anyway to Crooks, or Curley's Wife. While the other workers call Curley's Wife a 'tart' and '*****', Slim gives her the attention she desperately craves by calling her 'good lookin' - a friendly statement, but not a flirting one. Additionally, he never shows any prejudice to Crooks, in fact he is the only character which Crooks trusts. The fact that Slim shows no prejudice indicates to the reader that not all migrant workers in 1930's America were prejudiced towards black and female Americans.

    Furthermore, Slim is significant in the novella because he presents the theme of leadership to the reader. In all of the important decisions in the novella, Slim is there and all the characters look to him to make the decisions because, 'Slim's opinion was law'. For example, in the shooting of Candy's dog, Slim makes the final decision that it should be shot. However, he is not nasty to Candy as he offers him one of his 'pups' if he 'wanted to'. As well as this, after Curley's fight with Lennie, Slim takes control and tells Curley his hand 'got caught in a machine', forcing him to lye to save Lennie. This juxtaposes the idea the all migrant workers had to follow the orders given to them by their superiors, and shows that Slim is a natural leader.

    Moreover, Slim is significant in revealing the theme of friendship in the novella. Throughout the story, Slim develops a good friendship with George. This is important as without Slim, perhaps George might not have killed Lennie, as he would have been alone. After George has killed Lennie, Slim is the only character to understand his emotion be repeating 'you hadda' to him, in an attempt to comfort him. In contrast to this, Carlson and Curley has not idea 'whats eatin' George, which links to the idea that all migrant workers in 1930's America were lonely, and had very little emotion. Slim is important in revealing that this is not the case.

    Overall, Slim is significant in Of Mice and Men because shows no prejudice, develops a friendship with George (which could have been what caused George to kill Lennie), and he is a natural leader.

    Hope this helps! I am also taking the exam on Monday. I really hope Slim does come up.
    -KingCadee
    Is that an A*, and please can you write one for Candy and Curley as they may come. Great analysis thanks soo much!
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    Not sure what the grade is, but I came out of GCSE English Lit + Lag with 2 grade As. Unfortunately, I'm currently revising for my A Level Literature exam so don't have the time to do Candy and Curley! Good luck though
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    (Original post by kingcadee)

    Slim is a significant character in Of Mice and Men. He juxtaposes the usual interpretation of a Migrant Worker in 1930s America, he also presents many of the themes such as prejudice, and friendship.

    When we are first introduced to Slim, he is described as the 'prince of the ranch', suggesting that he has great power. This idea is reinforced by Steinbeck when we are informed that he 'don't need to wear no high heeled boots', which shows that unlike Curley, Slim naturally has the respect of the other migrant workers on the ranch. This links to the American Dream, as although Slim might not have his own land, he is the natural leader of all the other workers on the ranch, possibly including Curley.

    Additionally, Slim is important in the Novella in revealing information about George and Lennie's past in Weed. George immeditly trusts him enough to know he 'wouldn't tell' without Slim saying anything, indicating to the reader that Slim is easy to talk to. Slim repeats the words 'He ain't mean' which shows the reader that all of the bad things Lennie did in Weed wasn't to be 'mean', but it was because he was scared. The conversation is very important, as it informs the reader about the 'red girl' in Weed. If the conversation had not happened, the reader would not know about it, and wouldn't be able to make the link that the same thing happens to Curley's Wife later in the novella.

    As well as this, Slim is significant in the novella because he juxtaposes all of the other characters feelings about prejudice. At no point in the novella is Slim nasty in anyway to Crooks, or Curley's Wife. While the other workers call Curley's Wife a 'tart' and '*****', Slim gives her the attention she desperately craves by calling her 'good lookin' - a friendly statement, but not a flirting one. Additionally, he never shows any prejudice to Crooks, in fact he is the only character which Crooks trusts. The fact that Slim shows no prejudice indicates to the reader that not all migrant workers in 1930's America were prejudiced towards black and female Americans.

    Furthermore, Slim is significant in the novella because he presents the theme of leadership to the reader. In all of the important decisions in the novella, Slim is there and all the characters look to him to make the decisions because, 'Slim's opinion was law'. For example, in the shooting of Candy's dog, Slim makes the final decision that it should be shot. However, he is not nasty to Candy as he offers him one of his 'pups' if he 'wanted to'. As well as this, after Curley's fight with Lennie, Slim takes control and tells Curley his hand 'got caught in a machine', forcing him to lye to save Lennie. This juxtaposes the idea the all migrant workers had to follow the orders given to them by their superiors, and shows that Slim is a natural leader.

    Moreover, Slim is significant in revealing the theme of friendship in the novella. Throughout the story, Slim develops a good friendship with George. This is important as without Slim, perhaps George might not have killed Lennie, as he would have been alone. After George has killed Lennie, Slim is the only character to understand his emotion be repeating 'you hadda' to him, in an attempt to comfort him. In contrast to this, Carlson and Curley has not idea 'whats eatin' George, which links to the idea that all migrant workers in 1930's America were lonely, and had very little emotion. Slim is important in revealing that this is not the case.

    Overall, Slim is significant in Of Mice and Men because shows no prejudice, develops a friendship with George (which could have been what caused George to kill Lennie), and he is a natural leader.

    Hope this helps! I am also taking the exam on Monday. I really hope Slim does come up.
    -KingCadee
    Saving this for later!
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    (Original post by kingcadee)
    not sure what the grade is, but i came out of gcse english lit + lag with 2 grade as. Unfortunately, i'm currently revising for my a level literature exam so don't have the time to do candy and curley! Good luck though
    thankyouu sooo much for this as slim did come up and this helped my hugely to structure some ideas togetherrrr
 
 
 
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