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    Hi I am new here and was wandering if anyone could fill in a quick survey for a mathematics project I am taking part in.
    Happy to fill in other people surveys if they have the same problem.
    Here is the link:

    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1-Z6...?usp=send_form

    Thank you
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    i forgot how to do Hex :/
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    (Original post by Bobjim12)
    i forgot how to do Hex :/
    No worries its nice to see people that new it at some point. But for a reminder:
    0123456789ABCDEF
    That's the most I can give.
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    Dude. Pretty terrible question choices to be honest. Why not test LOGICAL THINKING skills instead of the ability to regurgitate something out of a textbook, (or in the hexadecimal case, something off a wiki page? The hexadecimal question was the worst question.)

    Here's some questions that you could use: Aim for a difficulty where the average is about people getting 50% right.

    I tried to pick questions so people can do them even if they are in younger years, so you don't need any advanced mathematical knowledge to be able to do them.

    Let question 1 be an easier question to ease people in:

    (1) (123456789)^555 is divided by 5. What is the remainder?
    (Use a TEXTBOX format instead of multiple choice, so people cant guess or just verify the multiple choice answers.)

    (2) Four Rooks are placed on a 8x8 Chessboard. Find out the number of ways they can be placed without any of them attacking each other (None in same row or column).

    (3) A function is defined by 1/(x^2-1), for x greater than or equal to 2, so f(2) = 1/(2*2-1) = 1/3, and f(3) = 1/(3*3-1) = 1/8, and so on.

    Find the sum of f(2)+f(3)+f(4)+f(5)+f(6)+.... to Infinity!

    (4)a, b, and c are all POSITIVE INTEGERS, but (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c) < 1. Find the largest possible value of (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c).

    (5) A number of persons seat at a round table. It is known that there are 7 women who have a woman to their right and 12 women who have a
    man to their right. We know that 3 out of each 4 men have a woman to their right.
    How many people are seated at the table?

    To really differentiate the smart people try a difficult question like this (even I can't answer it :P)

    (6) A magician has cards numbered from 1 to 100, distributed in 3 boxes of different colors so that no box is empty. His trick consists of letting one person of the crowd choose two cards from different boxes without the magician watching. Then the person tells the magician the sum of the numbers on the two cards and he has to guess from which box no card was taken. In how many ways can the magician distribute the cards so that his trick always works?
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    (Original post by BigBadWoofWoof)
    Dude. Pretty terrible question choices to be honest. Why not test LOGICAL THINKING skills instead of the ability to regurgitate something out of a textbook, (or in the hexadecimal case, something off a wiki page? The hexadecimal question was the worst question.)

    Here's some questions that you could use: Aim for a difficulty where the average is about people getting 50% right.

    I tried to pick questions so people can do them even if they are in younger years, so you don't need any advanced mathematical knowledge to be able to do them.

    Let question 1 be an easier question to ease people in:

    (1) (123456789)^555 is divided by 5. What is the remainder?
    (Use a TEXTBOX format instead of multiple choice, so people cant guess or just verify the multiple choice answers.)

    (2) Four Rooks are placed on a 8x8 Chessboard. Find out the number of ways they can be placed without any of them attacking each other (None in same row or column).

    (3) A function is defined by 1/(x^2-1), for x greater than or equal to 2, so f(2) = 1/(2*2-1) = 1/3, and f(3) = 1/(3*3-1) = 1/8, and so on.

    Find the sum of f(2)+f(3)+f(4)+f(5)+f(6)+.... to Infinity!

    (4)a, b, and c are all POSITIVE INTEGERS, but (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c) < 1. Find the largest possible value of (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c).

    (5) A number of persons seat at a round table. It is known that there are 7 women who have a woman to their right and 12 women who have a
    man to their right. We know that 3 out of each 4 men have a woman to their right.
    How many people are seated at the table?

    To really differentiate the smart people try a difficult question like this:

    (6) A magician has cards numbered from 1 to 100, distributed in 3 boxes of different colors so that no box is empty. His trick consists of letting one person of the crowd choose two cards from different boxes without the magician watching. Then the person tells the magician the sum of the numbers on the two cards and he has to guess from which box no card was taken. In how many ways can the magician distribute the cards so that his trick always works?
    Thiese are great questions but you have to think about how much time realistically people are going to give on a survey.
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    Euler never played a video game ever, does this mean he wasn't good at maths?

    Anyway I filled in the survey. I'm surprised you haven't asked for other background information though like gender, age, education level (gcse/alevel/undergrad), etc.
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    (Original post by Bobjim12)
    Thiese are great questions but you have to think about how much time realistically people are going to give on a survey.
    You forgot the people visiting TSR are nerds like me who enjoy this stuff

    how the heck do you do question six though?
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    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    You forgot the people visiting TSR are nerds like me who enjoy this stuff

    how the heck do you do question six though?
    3(2)+sqrt(9)=6+3=9=y?
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    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    3(2)+sqrt(9)=6+3=9=y?
    no, I mean the question six woofwoof posted :P
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    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    You forgot the people visiting TSR are nerds like me who enjoy this stuff

    how the heck do you do question six though?
    Very good point.
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    The intention is to see if there's a correlation at this stage him not playing video games may have been a good thing.
    I did not ask for extra info as I wanted for the results to only show the correlation between time spent playing video games and the results.
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    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    You forgot the people visiting TSR are nerds like me who enjoy this stuff

    how the heck do you do question six though?
    I should have mentioned that I originally posted this on Reddit.
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    (Original post by BigBadWoofWoof)
    Dude. Pretty terrible question choices to be honest. Why not test LOGICAL THINKING skills instead of the ability to regurgitate something out of a textbook, (or in the hexadecimal case, something off a wiki page? The hexadecimal question was the worst question.)

    Here's some questions that you could use: Aim for a difficulty where the average is about people getting 50% right.

    I tried to pick questions so people can do them even if they are in younger years, so you don't need any advanced mathematical knowledge to be able to do them.

    Let question 1 be an easier question to ease people in:

    (1) (123456789)^555 is divided by 5. What is the remainder?
    (Use a TEXTBOX format instead of multiple choice, so people cant guess or just verify the multiple choice answers.)

    (2) Four Rooks are placed on a 8x8 Chessboard. Find out the number of ways they can be placed without any of them attacking each other (None in same row or column).

    (3) A function is defined by 1/(x^2-1), for x greater than or equal to 2, so f(2) = 1/(2*2-1) = 1/3, and f(3) = 1/(3*3-1) = 1/8, and so on.

    Find the sum of f(2)+f(3)+f(4)+f(5)+f(6)+.... to Infinity!

    (4)a, b, and c are all POSITIVE INTEGERS, but (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c) < 1. Find the largest possible value of (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c).

    (5) A number of persons seat at a round table. It is known that there are 7 women who have a woman to their right and 12 women who have a
    man to their right. We know that 3 out of each 4 men have a woman to their right.
    How many people are seated at the table?

    To really differentiate the smart people try a difficult question like this (even I can't answer it :P)

    (6) A magician has cards numbered from 1 to 100, distributed in 3 boxes of different colors so that no box is empty. His trick consists of letting one person of the crowd choose two cards from different boxes without the magician watching. Then the person tells the magician the sum of the numbers on the two cards and he has to guess from which box no card was taken. In how many ways can the magician distribute the cards so that his trick always works?
    Hi, first off I would like to thank you for looking at the survey.
    Objectively speaking your questions would be better at testing intelligence than my own. But, saying that I do not believe I would have received as many responses from reddit if I when't with a approach by the likes of the questions you propose.
    I am not saying that in a proper study it wouldn't be better to go with your questions as that would be wrong but in my circumstance (needing a lot of responses quickly) the fact that my questions required less thought meant that more people are likely to spend time on it.
    Looking in Retrospect using text boxes would be a far greater idea but would force me into scrapping 200 odd responses (mainly from reddit) and starting again.

    All that being said, if I were to redo this project I would definitely go with your approach and as such I commend you for your input as it has definitely expanded my knowledge on how to go about a task like this.

    Thank you again ^_^
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    (Original post by BigBadWoofWoof)
    Dude. Pretty terrible question choices to be honest. Why not test LOGICAL THINKING skills instead of the ability to regurgitate something out of a textbook, (or in the hexadecimal case, something off a wiki page? The hexadecimal question was the worst question.)

    Here's some questions that you could use: Aim for a difficulty where the average is about people getting 50% right.

    I tried to pick questions so people can do them even if they are in younger years, so you don't need any advanced mathematical knowledge to be able to do them.

    Let question 1 be an easier question to ease people in:

    (1) (123456789)^555 is divided by 5. What is the remainder?
    (Use a TEXTBOX format instead of multiple choice, so people cant guess or just verify the multiple choice answers.)

    (2) Four Rooks are placed on a 8x8 Chessboard. Find out the number of ways they can be placed without any of them attacking each other (None in same row or column).

    (3) A function is defined by 1/(x^2-1), for x greater than or equal to 2, so f(2) = 1/(2*2-1) = 1/3, and f(3) = 1/(3*3-1) = 1/8, and so on.

    Find the sum of f(2)+f(3)+f(4)+f(5)+f(6)+.... to Infinity!

    (4)a, b, and c are all POSITIVE INTEGERS, but (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c) < 1. Find the largest possible value of (1/a)+(1/b)+(1/c).

    (5) A number of persons seat at a round table. It is known that there are 7 women who have a woman to their right and 12 women who have a
    man to their right. We know that 3 out of each 4 men have a woman to their right.
    How many people are seated at the table?

    To really differentiate the smart people try a difficult question like this (even I can't answer it :P)

    (6) A magician has cards numbered from 1 to 100, distributed in 3 boxes of different colors so that no box is empty. His trick consists of letting one person of the crowd choose two cards from different boxes without the magician watching. Then the person tells the magician the sum of the numbers on the two cards and he has to guess from which box no card was taken. In how many ways can the magician distribute the cards so that his trick always works?
    do you have the answer to q6?

    I got 2 ways, 12 ways if you allow me to use the symmetry of the boxes to 'double count' (except it's double counting so it ends up multiplying my answer by 6) but I can't prove I found all of them but that's what my gut says

    anyone confirm?
 
 
 

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