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    What are they like at a level? Is there a lot of vocabulary/grammar to learn? Are the exams hard to score highly on?

    I am doing GCSEs and found French and Spanish GCSE quite easy, is there a big step up in workload at AS level?

    Cheers


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    There is a big step up from GCSE to A level, with lots more grammar and vocab to learn. You are likely to have a lot more work to do.
    The oral exam is harder because you have to improvise in the exam. You have a written exam with listening, reading and an essay. The essay is quite hard.
    I got an A* in GCSE Spanish and a B at AS and dropped it.
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    I do German at A-Level. Can I help you?

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    (Original post by izpenguin)
    There is a big step up from GCSE to A level, with lots more grammar and vocab to learn. You are likely to have a lot more work to do.
    The oral exam is harder because you have to improvise in the exam. You have a written exam with listening, reading and an essay. The essay is quite hard.
    I got an A* in GCSE Spanish and a B at AS and dropped it.
    Does the grammar get very difficult? Doesn't sound too good :/


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    (Original post by Don Joiner)
    What are they like at a level? Is there a lot of vocabulary/grammar to learn? Are the exams hard to score highly on?

    I am doing GCSEs and found French and Spanish GCSE quite easy, is there a big step up in workload at AS level?

    Cheers


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    I'm currently doing A2 French, and honestly, it's been relatively hard, but i've loved it!
    It's very different to GCSE, definitely more difficult. Wider range of vocabulary, and you have to get used to moving away from simple phrases you used at gcse, to much more sophisticated structures. Grammar's difficult, particularly because at gcse, you don't focus on it as much. In A-level however, grammar is REALLY important, you have to ensure you keep practicing so to get it right, and, to perform well in the writing section of the exam (i guess it comes useful in speaking too)

    Honestly, it's difficult to get an A at AS, it's harder than what you'd think. Easiest thing to get an A on though, is speaking - yet as someone rightly mentioned above, you have to be good at improvising, and speaking naturally, like you would in English.

    If you're motivated, and a dedicated person, you'll find it enjoyable, and it'll get easier
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    I got an A at GCSE French, then a B at AS and dropped it but it was amazing!! I had to let it go because I did much better in my other subjects so it made sense but it was far from easy. Also had a lot of native speakers in my class and most were fluent which I saw as a bit of a cop out for an A level but hey, each to their own. Grammar was a *****, but you get used to it, its just very repetitive and way harder than GCSE, hardest AS by farrrrrrrrr, but also most rewarding and enjoyable so go for it!!
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    (Original post by Saraaa_d)
    I'm currently doing A2 French, and honestly, it's been relatively hard, but i've loved it!
    It's very different to GCSE, definitely more difficult. Wider range of vocabulary, and you have to get used to moving away from simple phrases you used at gcse, to much more sophisticated structures. Grammar's difficult, particularly because at gcse, you don't focus on it as much. In A-level however, grammar is REALLY important, you have to ensure you keep practicing so to get it right, and, to perform well in the writing section of the exam (i guess it comes useful in speaking too)

    Honestly, it's difficult to get an A at AS, it's harder than what you'd think. Easiest thing to get an A on though, is speaking - yet as someone rightly mentioned above, you have to be good at improvising, and speaking naturally, like you would in English.

    If you're motivated, and a dedicated person, you'll find it enjoyable, and it'll get easier
    Wow thanks, I like the sound of improvised speaking exams, I don't think for GCSE you should be able to see the questions beforehand. It seems like you have to be pretty dedicated (which you clearly are) to do well hmm


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    Do both. You'll love it and so will Uni and your employers.


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    I can speak fluent Spanish...in Chinese.
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    (Original post by ****_Hunter)
    I can speak fluent Spanish...in Chinese.
    Please elaborate


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    depends what exam board you do at gcse, I did AQA which doesnt even have a writing and speaking exam. I dont think its that much of a step up and I do spanish (A at GCSE predicted A for As). Theres loads of vocab and theres new grammar but it's not "hard". Like theres gonna be new stuff because youll be studying at a higher level but its not a huge transition, imo
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    (Original post by ****_Hunter)
    I can speak fluent Spanish...in Chinese.
    i swear you post this in ever spanish thread smh
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    I'm doing French AS at the moment and there is no doubt that it is a lot harder than the GCSE, however, if you really enjoy languages I would recommend you take it. It's definitely one of the more worthwhile subjects I've taken.

    If you want to ask any more specific questions in happy to help


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    (Original post by Don Joiner)
    What are they like at a level? Is there a lot of vocabulary/grammar to learn? Are the exams hard to score highly on?

    I am doing GCSEs and found French and Spanish GCSE quite easy, is there a big step up in workload at AS level?

    Cheers

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    Hey! I don't know about Spanish, but I took GCSE French and German (AQA) and got an A* for both, they were my favourite subjects by far! So I ended up taking both for AS and I still love them

    I think at AS, I have spent time on them because I enjoy the languages and like to be creative when I write in them, so the grammar wasn't that much of a chore for me, the same way as some maths students see their questions just as a puzzle...

    The speaking is mostly improvised at AS (you get to choose one of the 4 topics to speak about, and you prepare bullet points in advance for a bit of confidence in the exam), but they aren't expecting fluency, they want you to show your passion for the language and that you can react to a variety of questions (within reason, the questions are never outrageous and link to the topics you study, e.g. we had Popular Culture, Healthy Living, Technology and Relationships)

    I'd advise taking one (or both!?) at A-level, it looks really impressive to universities and if it's not your favourite, but you're still good at the language (which you must be if you're doing 2 at GCSE), you can always drop it after AS! It helps if you practise on Memrise or Quizlet every so often just to drill in some of the vocab, as there's quite a lot if you try to learn it all in one go!

    It can also add diversity to your other A-Level options, and I think is looked upon favourably with a science? (I think)
    Sorry this is so long, hope it helps!!
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    (Original post by Ser Alex Toyne)
    I do German at A-Level. Can I help you?

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    Hey do you do German at A2 or AS?
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    Hi! I'm doing Spanish and French AS and I agree with what most people have said, that it is a big transition, especially on the grammar side! If you are dedicated and really want to do well then I'd say go for it! As long as you love the languages and will work hard on the grammar section then you will be fine! It was a shock to the system when I moved from GCSE to A level as I had got A* in both French and Spanish and in my first mock in Y12 I ended up getting a B in Spanish and a C in French! I felt awful! But my teachers just kept reminding me that when learning a language you have to build on it step by step, it doesn't just all come at once and now both my exams are this week and in my latest mock I had gotten an A in both, so if you do choose to take both and are worried how your grades have dropped, don't worry! It happens to everyone, you just have to keep positive and keep working at it will all come together in the end! Good luck with choosing! If you have any more questions, I'd be happy to help
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    I do A2 Spanish now... and its tough but it has not made me love Spanish any less. A 15 minute oral and 3 hour exam from WJEC is torture but its all so interesting. The environment and global warming in Spanish is awesome ❤😁
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    (Original post by Harrietgh98)
    Hi! I'm doing Spanish and French AS and I agree with what most people have said, that it is a big transition, especially on the grammar side! If you are dedicated and really want to do well then I'd say go for it! As long as you love the languages and will work hard on the grammar section then you will be fine! It was a shock to the system when I moved from GCSE to A level as I had got A* in both French and Spanish and in my first mock in Y12 I ended up getting a B in Spanish and a C in French! I felt awful! But my teachers just kept reminding me that when learning a language you have to build on it step by step, it doesn't just all come at once and now both my exams are this week and in my latest mock I had gotten an A in both, so if you do choose to take both and are worried how your grades have dropped, don't worry! It happens to everyone, you just have to keep positive and keep working at it will all come together in the end! Good luck with choosing! If you have any more questions, I'd be happy to help
    I think I'll do really bad in Spanish AS, I just scraped a A at GCSE and at GCSE It was more about remembering them actually being fluent so at as I feel like I'll end up getting D-C even if I put in 1 hour independent study a day-- I'm unsure any advice ?
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    Hey I was wondering HOW you got such good grades?

    I am currently doing AS Spanish, and I am struggling big time. I am doing Edexcel if that helps?
    I literally am finding it so difficult, the paper the speaking, everything. I got an A* at GCSE, and know I have to do work at home but I am honestly not sure what to do and how to get an A which I would LOOVE!

    Thankyou!
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    Hey! I was wondering whether you all think it's sensible to take it alongside Chemistry, Biology and Maths A Levels or would that be too much work? They have scrapped AS now so I won't have the option to drop it. I'm predicted an A* at GCSE and have got A*s in all my writing and speaking coursework but I have my college interview next week so need to decide??
    Thank you!!
 
 
 
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