Turn on thread page Beta

What do you think about this type of parenting? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    So the jist of the story was that there was a mother and her daughter kept on wondering off from the group of children she was with so to teach her a lesson she put on a mask, ran up behind her, put her hand over her mouth and said in a disguised voice something like 'I'm taking you away and you'll never see your family again.' She then carried her and was running for about a block before putting her down and unveiling herself. She said that the daughter was in hysterics but she was happy that her daughter had learnt her lesson and wouldn't do it again. She almost seemed proud of her parenting and some people in the comments were commending her and saying they were going to do something similar?!

    What do you think about this type of parenting?
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    poor child, that is awful
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    It's probably a good way to get the message across
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    It's a good way of parenting in my opinion. Scaring her smart. That girl now understands the dangerous consequences of her wandering off all the time.

    When I was in year 7, my tech teacher used to tell us horrible stories about people getting injured on the machines we had to use. Everyone was extra cautious and extra safe around those machines as a result.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It may be an effective way to get the message across, but that doesn't necessarily mean the end justifies the means. I personally disagree with what the mother did.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by undine_monty)
    It's a good way of parenting in my opinion. Scaring her smart. That girl now understands the dangerous consequences of her wandering off all the time.

    When I was in year 7, my tech teacher used to tell us horrible stories about people getting injured on the machines we had to use. Everyone was extra cautious and extra safe around those machines as a result.
    Yeah I get what you're saying about scaring her smart but there must be a more appropriate way of making sure your kid stays safe.

    With your year 7 example it'd be more like the teacher injuring you in one of the machines to make sure you don't do it again which would obviously be unacceptable.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by channies)
    Yeah I get what you're saying about scaring her smart but there must be a more appropriate way of making sure your kid stays safe.

    With your year 7 example it'd be more like the teacher injuring you in one of the machines to make sure you don't do it again which would obviously be unacceptable.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I see what you mean but it's different because the mother was in control and could ensure her child stay safe whilst 'kidnapping' her.

    I think this method should be as a last resort after all previous attempts to teach the child have failed. This can link with my school example where we all realised the danger of the machines without any having to repeat the consequences so further actions were not needed.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Well, if the child isn't emotionally scarred I see no problem with it.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Sounds like something my parents would do tbh
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by upagumtree)
    It's probably a good way to get the message across
    STFU, Bruv. It's an awful form of parenting!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Well my dad has been playing hide and seek with me for the past 24 years...he's so damn good at it, still haven't found him yet
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Protégé)
    Well, if the child isn't emotionally scarred I see no problem with it.
    Yep
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I think that's a bit over the top, and anyway, scaring her prbably won't even be that effective, she'll just forget about it after a couple of weeks and think 'it was only my mum, there's no way that would actually happen'
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Well...I guess it gets the message across.
    But that doesn't necassarily make it okay. It could do more harm than good if the child becomes seriously damaged from the incident.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by undine_monty)
    I see what you mean but it's different because the mother was in control and could ensure her child stay safe whilst 'kidnapping' her.

    I think this method should be as a last resort after all previous attempts to teach the child have failed. This can link with my school example where we all realised the danger of the machines without any having to repeat the consequences so further actions were not needed.
    Although the mother could ensure the child stayed safe physically, the child was unaware that it wasn't real and was still susceptible to experiencing the trauma of it happening for real. So emotionally and mentally it was real to them.

    I still wouldn't ever use it as a means of teaching the child a lesson, but if they really weren't listening to my concerns about their safety I don't know what I'd do, but I just couldn't bring myself to treat them that way.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Sometimes children need to learn the hard way.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Squad
    How old was the kid? If I did that to one of mine, they'd have nightmares for weeks. There's no way I would put them through something like that. Mind you, my kids don't randomly wander away either
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
    How old was the kid? If I did that to one of mine, they'd have nightmares for weeks. There's no way I would put them through something like that. Mind you, my kids don't randomly wander away either
    I don't think the article said but as she was able to pick her up and run with her I'd guess under 7


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by channies)
    I don't think the article said but as she was able to pick her up and run with her I'd guess under 7


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yeah that's what I assumed as well. There's just no way I'd do that. Hell, even my 9 year old would freak out at that.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Great way of getting the message across, but sounds terrifying.

    So I'm not really sure.
 
 
 

2,809

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources
AtCTs

Ask the Community Team

Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

Welcome Lounge

Welcome Lounge

We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.