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Software to password protect a USB stick watch

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    I'm going to be backing up my photos onto a USB stick. I only have about 3 GB and don't want to spend money on an external hard drive. Is there any good free security software to password protect a USB stick?
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    I wouldn't trust any freeware security for USB sticks to be quite honest.
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    I agree with A5ko, If you know how to code, you can always code your own . I think It's pretty straightforward to code one.
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    The easiest solution considering the cost would just be to buy an encrypted usb stick.
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    (Original post by ImNotSuperman)
    I'm going to be backing up my photos onto a USB stick. I only have about 3 GB and don't want to spend money on an external hard drive. Is there any good free security software to password protect a USB stick?
    You don't need to buy any software as you can do it for free straight from your window computer build in application, heres a guide it seems very simple ;

    http://www.tomsguide.com/faq/id-2318...ash-drive.html
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    Restricting access to the contents on your USB stick by password is a weak form of security, what you should really be doing if you value your privacy is encrypting your data.

    (Original post by Async)
    I agree with A5ko, If you know how to code, you can always code your own . I think It's pretty straightforward to code one.
    This is an awful idea. You'd find it incredibly difficult to create a secure solution.
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    Restricting access to the contents on your USB stick by password is a weak form of security, what you should really be doing if you value your privacy is encrypting your data.


    This is an awful idea. You'd find it incredibly difficult to create a secure solution.
    Doesn't have to be incredible "secure" considering that only a small percentage of people will actually have the knowledge and skills required to breach the security measures implemented onto the USB stick. And it's pictures, not like is some top secret documents. However, I do agree though, if you're going to do something, its worthwhile to do it well, especially when data protection is involved.

    Anyway, I was thinking more of just encrypting the files you have on the USB stick, when you plug in your USB, you type in your password and that decrpyts the images. I have a similar app on my phone that I use to hide files.
    I understand I've never studied cryptography so my knowledge in these fields in quiet limited, but I'm sure that's the logic behind this. Wouldn't using some sort of symmetric encryption or asymmetric encryption suffice?

    I'd like to know why you think is a bad idea though? (Offcourse nothing is ever secure, but I'd like to learn something new)
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    Ah, so you mean to use encryption? I thought you meant just using a password as access control. But yes, if you care about your data you should secure it properly, otherwise what's the point?

    There are generally two ways to secure a device:
    1. Using a password to restrict access
    2. Using encryption to basically scramble all data

    1. Just using a password to restrict access could be thought of as just putting a locked door in front of all your data. To get access to it you open the file (knock on the door) and then you have to give the password to get access (and the door opens). This works in that it prevents access in the most basic cases. The level of knowledge needed to circumvent this would be minimal depending on the implementation...
    For example, if you think about your Windows computer, you might have a password on your account and you could reasonably assume that all your data is secure because no one else knows the password, so they can't get access. But you could simply boot a Linux live CD, mount your HDD and read the data because the password isn't protecting the data, it's preventing access for logging into Windows (i.e. normal usage).

    2. Using an encryption algorithm that has been created by very clever people and tested and attacked by other clever people is much safer. When you encrypt your data it effectively scrambles it so it looks like gibberish unless you possess a "key" (which would be a password in this scenario). Symmetric encryption would be used because the algorithm can encrypt and decrypt the data using the same key.


    If you roll your own encryption for data that you care about (which you obviously do as you're wanting it secured) you can't be sure you haven't made a major security mistake if you're not an expert in cryptography and have had it analysed by multiple experts. As Bruce Schneier says "Anyone can invent an encryption algorithm they themselves can't break; it's much harder to invent one that no one else can break".


    If you're learning about cryptography or want a little programming challenge it can be good practise to create something yourself, but you should never use it for real world data.
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
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    Oh, well my whole argument was based on the assumption that you thought that using encryption was a bad idea. I never knew you meant password access (which I agree is a bad idea). It's so easy to breach one that is password protected, simply run it through a recovery software like Recuva.
    But yeah, I'd never really use my own algorithms as a means of securing things, I'd rather use one that is thoroughly tested and proven to be good enough to use, such algorithms like SHA2 and this other algorithm I can't remember the name of ..

    I knew the stuff you had mentioned already, I thought you was going to lecture me on how encryption could be breached (apart from bruteforce attacks) . Well, it's nice to know that I'm on the right track. But yeah, after these exams, I plan to expand my knowledge on what I know. I do plan to teach myself some cryptography and create my own crypto algorithm for learning purposes.
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    (Original post by ImNotSuperman)
    I'm going to be backing up my photos onto a USB stick. I only have about 3 GB and don't want to spend money on an external hard drive. Is there any good free security software to password protect a USB stick?
    Use Truecrypt and create an encrypted container on there.

    Anyone that says "roll your own" when it comes to encryption is on drugs.
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    Use Truecrypt and create an encrypted container on there.
    I thought TrueCrypt wasn't recommended anymore because the dev abandoned the project in somewhat suspicious circumstances?
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    I thought TrueCrypt wasn't recommended anymore because the dev abandoned the project in somewhat suspicious circumstances?
    Nah, it got independently audited and was found to be pretty solid. The original dev did a runner, but someone forked the code and saved it from being abandoned.
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    Why not simply encrypt your data if you want to keep it private?

    By the way, USB sticks are an awful medium to back up onto. They wear out over time, are not cheap per gigabyte and don't provide high capacities or data throughput.
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    Hey, I know this may seem pretty basic, but why rely on a USB stick? Why not encrypt all your photos to cloud storage and not worry about where they physically are? This article was pretty helpful for me when I was looking for a secure cloud solution that wouldn't just take ownership of my data and sell it!

    http://lifehacker.com/the-best-cloud...riva-729639300

    The whole 'access on any device' element is pretty nifty, too.

    Most of them give over 3GB free as well...so it's convenient and hassle free.
 
 
 

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