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    I have been reading that Curley, Candy and Carlson are very likely to come up this year in the AQA high literature paper, so I just wanted some points for each and how they are significant in the novella, as part of a theme for instance.

    Thanks

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    I don't think Candy will come up cos he's come up before I was also wondering about those characters- but is it possible a theme question could come up - like 'how is hope or companionship shown in this extract'?
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    I'm not sure how carlson would come up as all he does is kill candy's dog and questions what is wrong with George right at the end of the novella.

    As for Curley I prepared some answers in yr 10:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    3. What are your first impressions of Curley?
    Steinbeck presents Curley as a dislikable person from our first encounter with him. Curley is portrayed as a man who gets away with anything because he is the boss' son. George says "This guy Curley sounds like a son-of-a-***** to me. I don't like mean little guys." Within the short space of time that George has met Curley, he has already assumed a dislike to him. Curley seems to be abusing his postion hence causing ranch workers to resent him. He is a very aggressive man who often threatens fellow ranch workers to obey him despite being of similar status within the ranch hierarchy. Curley's presence causes tension in the scene betwee himself and Lennie. "He glanced coldly at George and then Lennie. His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands closed into fists" This shows Curley's body language of clenching his fists to intimidate George and Lennie. Curley see's Lennie as an opponents he wants to fight in the boxing ring. "His glance was at once calculating and pugnacious" shows Curley examining them and scowling. Steinbeck makes it obvious that Lennie intimidated and threated by Curley's presence as "Lennie squirmed under the look and shifted his feet nervously." As Curley steps "gingerly" close to Lennie, he could also feel intimidated by Lennie's big size.
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    The only points I have for Carlson are:
    -He is arrogant
    -Probably the most least sensitive to the feelings of others
    -He had selfish motives for killing the dog (because of the smell)
    -He could be insensitive because he has not had time to forge relationships due to the constant replacement/ temporary stay of workers?
    -He exists mainly because Steinbeck wanted to show the cross-section of the types of men in the bunkhouse

    These aren't all my points btw, I got them off various websites
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    (Original post by K K)
    I'm not sure how carlson would come up as all he does is kill candy's dog and questions what is wrong with George right at the end of the novella.

    As for Curley I prepared some answers in yr 10:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    3. What are your first impressions of Curley?
    Steinbeck presents Curley as a dislikable person from our first encounter with him. Curley is portrayed as a man who gets away with anything because he is the boss' son. George says "This guy Curley sounds like a son-of-a-***** to me. I don't like mean little guys." Within the short space of time that George has met Curley, he has already assumed a dislike to him. Curley seems to be abusing his postion hence causing ranch workers to resent him. He is a very aggressive man who often threatens fellow ranch workers to obey him despite being of similar status within the ranch hierarchy. Curley's presence causes tension in the scene betwee himself and Lennie. "He glanced coldly at George and then Lennie. His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands closed into fists" This shows Curley's body language of clenching his fists to intimidate George and Lennie. Curley see's Lennie as an opponents he wants to fight in the boxing ring. "His glance was at once calculating and pugnacious" shows Curley examining them and scowling. Steinbeck makes it obvious that Lennie intimidated and threated by Curley's presence as "Lennie squirmed under the look and shifted his feet nervously." As Curley steps "gingerly" close to Lennie, he could also feel intimidated by Lennie's big size.
    Thanks
    Do you have anything about Candy, since all I can think about for his character is how he wants to be part of the dream and his dog being shot?

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    Well Candy's dream is to own the farm along with George and Lennie, he's desperate and willing to pay money, he yearns for companionship in his old age as his only friend, his dog, is gone. So he seeks friendship in Lennie and this dream of the farm in Candy's perspective will offer security for his old age and a home where he will fit in. It will be a place where he will be able to assert his responsibility which he didn't have when Carlson killed his dog. Most of the characters have obstacles, Candy's is his age and he is discriminated against his age too just like Crooks is about his race and Curley's wife is about her gender. That's all I can think of right now but I'm sure if you youtube "mrbruff candy omam" something is bound to come up which will help you

    Are you prepared?
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    (Original post by K K)
    Well Candy's dream is to own the farm along with George and Lennie, he's desperate and willing to pay money, he yearns for companionship in his old age as his only friend, his dog, is gone. So he seeks friendship in Lennie and this dream of the farm in Candy's perspective will offer security for his old age and a home where he will fit in. It will be a place where he will be able to assert his responsibility which he didn't have when Carlson killed his dog. Most of the characters have obstacles, Candy's is his age and he is discriminated against his age too just like Crooks is about his race and Curley's wife is about her gender. That's all I can think of right now but I'm sure if you youtube "mrbruff candy omam" something is bound to come up which will help you

    Are you prepared?
    Thanks a lot

    And I'm just trying to remember some quotes for each theme and I've also got An Inspector Calls quotes to learn which is a pain. As long as I remember some quotes I think I should be alright.

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    I find AIC easier than OMAM, the concept is more obvious. Good luck.
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    (Original post by K K)
    I find AIC easier than OMAM, the concept is more obvious. Good luck.
    Do you have any key points that you could share about AIC?
    And thanks

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    Priestley's intention
    - show younger gen feel empathy and can change.. older gen remain unchanged
    - he was a socialist, inspector goole was a mouthpiece to get priestley's message across
    - emphasises the social inequality in the classes

    do you have any specific questions? this is helping me revise lmao
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    (Original post by K K)
    Priestley's intention
    - show younger gen feel empathy and can change.. older gen remain unchanged
    - he was a socialist, inspector goole was a mouthpiece to get priestley's message across
    - emphasises the social inequality in the classes

    do you have any specific questions? this is helping me revise lmao
    I just need some quotes which I can use for word analysis since that is what you need to get into the higher bands.

    Also, I need some stage directions in speech that I could link to the point.

    Thanks

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    Hi, I'm assuming this is for the aqa board. This is a bit of a stupid question, but do we actually get given a copy of the book in the real exam right :P?
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    (Original post by chrmndr)
    I just need some quotes which I can use for word analysis since that is what you need to get into the higher bands.

    Also, I need some stage directions in speech that I could link to the point.

    Thanks

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    Hey, i have a thread for omam and aic, i posted a few key quotations a while ago, you're welcome to check that out of you're interested


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    (Original post by TheTruthTeller)
    Hi, I'm assuming this is for the aqa board. This is a bit of a stupid question, but do we actually get given a copy of the book in the real exam right :P?
    Yes, you get given a copy but I don't want to waste time flicking through the book looking for quotes, and would rather prepare and memorize them now so I know what to say and I will manage my time better

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    (Original post by ATown)
    The only points I have for Carlson are:
    -He is arrogant
    -Probably the most least sensitive to the feelings of others
    -He had selfish motives for killing the dog (because of the smell)
    -He could be insensitive because he has not had time to forge relationships due to the constant replacement/ temporary stay of workers?
    -He exists mainly because Steinbeck wanted to show the cross-section of the types of men in the bunkhouse

    These aren't all my points btw, I got them off various websites
    Carlson could be viewed as a metaphor for stereotypical ranch workers, perhaps like George will become in a few years time (After all, George isn't your stereotypical ranch worker as he has Lennie).
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    [QUOTE=ATown;55870799]The only points I have for Carlson are:
    -He is arrogant
    -Probably the most least sensitive to the feelings of others
    -He had selfish motives for killing the dog (because of the smell)
    -He could be insensitive because he has not had time to forge relationships due to the constant replacement/ temporary stay of workers?
    -He exists mainly because Steinbeck wanted to show the cross-section of the types of men in the bunkhouse

    These aren't all my points btw, I got them off various websites [/QUOTE

    I suppose it could be the very last page of omam as it ends on the rhetorical question Carlson asks & Steinveck does that to show that he is the stereotypical migrant worker

    If it's the last page I'll be in heaven!
 
 
 
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