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    Hi


    It'd be great if someone could advise please, as I'm in a bit of a muddle and it may be one of those obvious questions that isn't dawning on me.
    When I do past papers it often states to write an equation, I've got into a habit of drawing out the reactants and products of the equation. I find this easier and you don't have to learn the molecular formulas( by this I mean my molecular formula never matches the one in the mark scheme).
    Would this be penalised?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Cupcakez18)
    Hi


    It'd be great if someone could advise please, as I'm in a bit of a muddle and it may be one of those obvious questions that isn't dawning on me.
    When I do past papers it often states to write an equation, I've got into a habit of drawing out the reactants and products of the equation. I find this easier and you don't have to learn the molecular formulas( by this I mean my molecular formula never matches the one in the mark scheme).
    Would this be penalised?

    Thanks
    What do you mean by drawing?

    What level are you studying at? GCSE/A-Level?

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    Hi
    Thanks for replying.
    By drawing I mean doing the displayed formula. I'm studying A level.
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    (Original post by Cupcakez18)
    Hi
    Thanks for replying.
    By drawing I mean doing the displayed formula. I'm studying A level.
    Then surely you can write the molecular formula? I'm confused

    If it doesn't specify which type of formula to use, doing that is probably fine.

    In OCR Chem A you are usually told a formula to use (in which case, yes, you would be penalised for using the wrong one), but I'm not sure which exam board you're on, so it may be different :yep:
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    (Original post by Neuth)
    Then surely you can write the molecular formula? I'm confused

    If it doesn't specify which type of formula to use, doing that is probably fine.

    In OCR Chem A you are usually told a formula to use (in which case, yes, you would be penalised for using the wrong one), but I'm not sure which exam board you're on, so it may be different :yep:
    I think its obvious I don't explain myself very well

    It doesn't specify in the question I'm doing the AQA exam board.

    for example if I needed to write the formula for ethanoic anhydride I'd write CH3COOCOCH3 but in the mark scheme it'd say (CH3CO)^2 O. I know that they're the same but I worry I'd be penalised. There's lot of instances where I've written the formula backwards/differently to them.
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    (Original post by Cupcakez18)
    I think its obvious I don't explain myself very well

    It doesn't specify in the question I'm doing the AQA exam board.

    for example if I needed to write the formula for ethanoic anhydride I'd write CH3COOCOCH3 but in the mark scheme it'd say (CH3CO)^2 O. I know that they're the same but I worry I'd be penalised. There's lot of instances where I've written the formula backwards/differently to them.
    Ah, I see what you mean - you do the shorthand/condensded formula and they've written the molecular formula.

    Does it not say anything about it in the mark schemes? :dontknow:

    I wouldn't think they could mark you wrong for using a different type of formula, but I'm not too sure what AQA Chem is like - maybe you're meant to put molecular for everything or something?
 
 
 
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