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    For 'An Inspector calls' can someone analyse this quote for me at an A* standard:

    Sheila - 'Oh - Gerald - you've got it - is it the one you wanted me to have?

    The analysis would need to suggest that Gerald is in control of their relationship.
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    (Original post by Nila15)
    For 'An Inspector calls' can someone analyse this quote for me at an A* standard:

    Sheila - 'Oh - Gerald - you've got it - is it the one you wanted me to have?

    The analysis would need to suggest that Gerald is in control of their relationship.
    You could take about the pronoun "you" to show how Gerald is in control, and he has chosen the ring, and that Sheila is aware that she has little say. Also, you could take about how it is the ring that he "wanted" her to have which further conveys Gerald as the dominant partner in the relationship.

    You could then link this to how women were seen as subservient during the setting of the play, and how it reflects the society of the time.
    Context is not something that you get marks for but you could refer to Priestley's views about equality between men and women.

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    (Original post by Nila15)
    For 'An Inspector calls' can someone analyse this quote for me at an A* standard:

    Sheila - 'Oh - Gerald - you've got it - is it the one you wanted me to have?

    The analysis would need to suggest that Gerald is in control of their relationship.
    The words 'you wanted' implies that not only is Gerald in control of their relationship, but he also controls Sheila's mindset. The fact that she poses a question connotes to the reader that she adheres to not only Gerald's preferences, but also her outlook on life, and the way in which the ruling class should conduct themselves within society.

    The word 'wanted' creates a sense of ownership and entitlement- it is almost as though he has a right to make Sheila's decisions for her, as her husband to be. This has been done intentionally by Priestley to represent the way in which women were treated during Edwardian England- their sole purpose was to merely support their husbands, but never by necessarily offering their own opinions or advice. This is why Sybil recognises that they must exit the dining room and 'leave the men' to discuss matters of importance. The fact that Gerald now has the ability to make decisions for Sheila perhaps implies that she has become nothing more than a possession that Gerald is free to manipulate as he pleases.

    The fact that Gerald chose the 'ring' is equally symbolic of his dominance within the relationship. A ring is a symbol of not only love, but a covenant between two parties- it is supposed to be be emblematic of a mutual agreement between two people. Conversely, since Gerald had the final say on which ring he presents to Sheila as a supposed token of their love, this implies that their relationship isn't reciprocal in nature, but is in fact controlled entirely by Gerald.

    Again, this has been done by Priestley to show the lack of gender equality at the time the play is set. Gerald and Sheila are both members of the ruling class, yet Gerald is perceived as the more dominant member of the relationship simply because he is a man. Priestley aims to teach the reader an important lesson about equality- irrespective of whether you're a woman, you are free to make decisions for yourself, without the fear of being coerced by the opposite sex into fulfilling their wishes instead of your own.

    Is this along the lines of what you were looking for?
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    Thank you so much!!! and yes I was looking for that kind of analysis....
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    (Original post by asapsimeon)
    The words 'you wanted' implies that not only is Gerald in control of their relationship, but he also controls Sheila's mindset. The fact that she poses a question connotes to the reader that she adheres to not only Gerald's preferences, but also her outlook on life, and the way in which the ruling class should conduct themselves within society.

    The word 'wanted' creates a sense of ownership and entitlement- it is almost as though he has a right to make Sheila's decisions for her, as her husband to be. This has been done intentionally by Priestley to represent the way in which women were treated during Edwardian England- their sole purpose was to merely support their husbands, but never by necessarily offering their own opinions or advice. This is why Sybil recognises that they must exit the dining room and 'leave the men' to discuss matters of importance. The fact that Gerald now has the ability to make decisions for Sheila perhaps implies that she has become nothing more than a possession that Gerald is free to manipulate as he pleases.

    The fact that Gerald chose the 'ring' is equally symbolic of his dominance within the relationship. A ring is a symbol of not only love, but a covenant between two parties- it is supposed to be be emblematic of a mutual agreement between two people. Conversely, since Gerald had the final say on which ring he presents to Sheila as a supposed token of their love, this implies that their relationship isn't reciprocal in nature, but is in fact controlled entirely by Gerald.

    Again, this has been done by Priestley to show the lack of gender equality at the time the play is set. Gerald and Sheila are both members of the ruling class, yet Gerald is perceived as the more dominant member of the relationship simply because he is a man. Priestley aims to teach the reader an important lesson about equality- irrespective of whether you're a woman, you are free to make decisions for yourself, without the fear of being coerced by the opposite sex into fulfilling their wishes instead of your own.

    Is this along the lines of what you were looking for?
    Jesus :eek: How did you think of such analysis?
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    (Original post by asapsimeon)
    The words 'you wanted' implies that not only is Gerald in control of their relationship, but he also controls Sheila's mindset. The fact that she poses a question connotes to the reader that she adheres to not only Gerald's preferences, but also her outlook on life, and the way in which the ruling class should conduct themselves within society. The word 'wanted' creates a sense of ownership and entitlement- it is almost as though he has a right to make Sheila's decisions for her, as her husband to be. This has been done intentionally by Priestley to represent the way in which women were treated during Edwardian England- their sole purpose was to merely support their husbands, but never by necessarily offering their own opinions or advice. This is why Sybil recognises that they must exit the dining room and 'leave the men' to discuss matters of importance. The fact that Gerald now has the ability to make decisions for Sheila perhaps implies that she has become nothing more than a possession that Gerald is free to manipulate as he pleases.The fact that Gerald chose the 'ring' is equally symbolic of his dominance within the relationship. A ring is a symbol of not only love, but a covenant between two parties- it is supposed to be be emblematic of a mutual agreement between two people. Conversely, since Gerald had the final say on which ring he presents to Sheila as a supposed token of their love, this implies that their relationship isn't reciprocal in nature, but is in fact controlled entirely by Gerald.Again, this has been done by Priestley to show the lack of gender equality at the time the play is set. Gerald and Sheila are both members of the ruling class, yet Gerald is perceived as the more dominant member of the relationship simply because he is a man. Priestley aims to teach the reader an important lesson about equality- irrespective of whether you're a woman, you are free to make decisions for yourself, without the fear of being coerced by the opposite sex into fulfilling their wishes instead of your own.Is this along the lines of what you were looking for?

    wow, are you in yr11, this is amazing
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    (Original post by rumana101)
    wow, are you in yr11, this is amazing
    Thanks, and yes; I have the exam tomorrow.
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    (Original post by asapsimeon)
    Thanks, and yes; I have the exam tomorrow.
    Though not related to this thread, what have you been revising most for OMAM, I know context is important, but have you got anything either on context or the rest of the novella that you think are good points that could be used for a lot of questions?
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    (Original post by Nila15)
    For 'An Inspector calls' can someone analyse this quote for me at an A* standard:

    Sheila - 'Oh - Gerald - you've got it - is it the one you wanted me to have?

    The analysis would need to suggest that Gerald is in control of their relationship.
    It shows that she's asking for his approval which shows that she would need to ask permission for most things which supports your point of Gerald being controlling.
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    (Original post by asapsimeon)
    Thanks, and yes; I have the exam tomorrow.
    what are your predictions for AIC?
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    (Original post by Marshall Taylor)
    Jesus :eek: How did you think of such analysis?
    Honestly, I just came up with it on the spot. I was testing to see whether I'd be able to write 'a lot about a little'.
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    (Original post by asapsimeon)
    The words 'you wanted' implies that not only is Gerald in control of their relationship, but he also controls Sheila's mindset. The fact that she poses a question connotes to the reader that she adheres to not only Gerald's preferences, but also her outlook on life, and the way in which the ruling class should conduct themselves within society.

    The word 'wanted' creates a sense of ownership and entitlement- it is almost as though he has a right to make Sheila's decisions for her, as her husband to be. This has been done intentionally by Priestley to represent the way in which women were treated during Edwardian England- their sole purpose was to merely support their husbands, but never by necessarily offering their own opinions or advice. This is why Sybil recognises that they must exit the dining room and 'leave the men' to discuss matters of importance. The fact that Gerald now has the ability to make decisions for Sheila perhaps implies that she has become nothing more than a possession that Gerald is free to manipulate as he pleases.

    The fact that Gerald chose the 'ring' is equally symbolic of his dominance within the relationship. A ring is a symbol of not only love, but a covenant between two parties- it is supposed to be be emblematic of a mutual agreement between two people. Conversely, since Gerald had the final say on which ring he presents to Sheila as a supposed token of their love, this implies that their relationship isn't reciprocal in nature, but is in fact controlled entirely by Gerald.

    Again, this has been done by Priestley to show the lack of gender equality at the time the play is set. Gerald and Sheila are both members of the ruling class, yet Gerald is perceived as the more dominant member of the relationship simply because he is a man. Priestley aims to teach the reader an important lesson about equality- irrespective of whether you're a woman, you are free to make decisions for yourself, without the fear of being coerced by the opposite sex into fulfilling their wishes instead of your own.

    Is this along the lines of what you were looking for?
    wow, that was brilliant - did you actually write this specifically to answer this thread?
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    (Original post by Miss A. Hepburn)
    wow, that was brilliant - did you actually write this specifically to answer this thread?
    Yes
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    How can it link to gender or class
 
 
 
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