What is the difference between yield point and elastic limit?

Watch this thread
lappong99
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Could anyone have a look at this? Question 16c.
I wrote 'elastic limit' and 'it is the point beyond which the material is permanently deformed.' but the mark scheme say different things. How is it possible to distinguish between the two of them from the graph given?

https://c181ae78b6fc6200ce96232927a6...%20Physics.pdf

https://c181ae78b6fc6200ce96232927a6...%20Physics.pdf
0
reply
lappong99
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#2
sorry i have posted the wrong links
markscheme: http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...c_20140306.pdf

paper:http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...e_20140115.pdf
0
reply
16characterlimit
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
Elastic Limit as you correctly defined is the point at which a further increase in stress leads to permanent deformation, it is shortly after the limit of proportionality, so the material might not obey Hooke's law but the deformation would be still elastic.

Yield point is the point at which a further increase in stress leads to a much larger increase in extension/stress, and is the reason you have that curved down part before the material breaks, it is after the elastic limit.

If you have done a Hooke's law experiment in class you will notice that if you put enough masses eventually the spring hugely stretches just by adding 1 more mass, that's the yield point hit.
0
reply
lappong99
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by 16characterlimit)
Elastic Limit as you correctly defined is the point at which a further increase in stress leads to permanent deformation, it is shortly after the limit of proportionality, so the material might not obey Hooke's law but the deformation would be still elastic.

Yield point is the point at which a further increase in stress leads to a much larger increase in extension/stress, and is the reason you have that curved down part before the material breaks, it is after the elastic limit.

If you have done a Hooke's law experiment in class you will notice that if you put enough masses eventually the spring hugely stretches just by adding 1 more mass, that's the yield point hit.
Thank you

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Year 12s - where are you at with making decisions about university?

I’ve chosen my course and my university (18)
31.03%
I’ve chosen my course and shortlisted some universities (22)
37.93%
I’ve chosen my course, but not any universities (2)
3.45%
I’ve chosen my university, but not my course (3)
5.17%
I’ve shortlisted some universities, but not my course (4)
6.9%
I’m starting to consider my university options (7)
12.07%
I haven’t started thinking about university yet (1)
1.72%
I’m not planning on going to university (1)
1.72%

Watched Threads

View All