DanielleLeahnora
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I have a B in biology GCSE and a C in Maths but a lot of courses seem to want a B in maths so now I'm scared there is a lot of maths that I won't be able to handle?! I can deal with maths as long as its not crazy stuff and I can deal with the science part if I put my head to it…also what good unis accept a C in maths if any?!

I study Psychology, English Language and Performance studies and out of all of them I would love to pursue psychology!
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
I have a B in biology GCSE and a C in Maths but a lot of courses seem to want a B in maths so now I'm scared there is a lot of maths that I won't be able to handle?! I can deal with maths as long as its not crazy stuff and I can deal with the science part if I put my head to it…also what good unis accept a C in maths if any?!

I study Psychology, English Language and Performance studies and out of all of them I would love to pursue psychology!
Well psychology is generally considered to be a science, so yes there is a lot of science (although lots of it is more wishy-washy than the rest).

Any psychology degree requires a basic level of statistics and biological psychology, however this is not very much. The statistics you do in psychology tends to be mostly about using a computer program rather than understanding and applying equations- so you need to understand how to interpret the numbers rather than where they come from.

Even though all psychology degrees need to cover some basic modules in order to be BPS accredited, they differ ALOT in terms of what optional modules are available. Some unis will be heavily biased towards having more social/developmental options over biological/cognitive options, but most will have a good balance.
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Katy100
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
I have a B in biology GCSE and a C in Maths but a lot of courses seem to want a B in maths so now I'm scared there is a lot of maths that I won't be able to handle?! I can deal with maths as long as its not crazy stuff and I can deal with the science part if I put my head to it…also what good unis accept a C in maths if any?!

I study Psychology, English Language and Performance studies and out of all of them I would love to pursue psychology!
Absolutely tons unfortunately!! Psychology is very scientific and because of the nature of the data that is assessed it actually uses more advanced statistics than some other sciences. A lot of time is spent analyzing data (both using specialized computer packages and by hand), sitting statistics exams and writing scientific papers/reports.

The kind of statistics that you will need to know will include:
Correlation (Spearman's and Pearsons)
T-tests
Chi-square
Wilcoxon signed ranks test
ANOVAs, MANOVAs
Regression analysis

I'm an undergrad Psychology student and I really really hate statistics. If you want to go down a Psychology career path I would really really recommend going for another degree - English would be really interesting (!) and then taking a one-year conversion to Psychology course/masters or diploma if you are still sure you want to study Psychology
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Magdatrix >_<
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
I have a B in biology GCSE and a C in Maths but a lot of courses seem to want a B in maths so now I'm scared there is a lot of maths that I won't be able to handle?! I can deal with maths as long as its not crazy stuff and I can deal with the science part if I put my head to it…also what good unis accept a C in maths if any?!

I study Psychology, English Language and Performance studies and out of all of them I would love to pursue psychology!
Since Psychology is a science, I'd say lots of science!

As for maths, usually about 1/4 of your first year modules involves statistics and research methods - but they start very basic, so anyone with a GCSE should be able to keep up!

As someone who now teaches statistics to first and second years, the most important advice I can give is to not be scared! Fear of stats is the biggest barrier to succeeding at stats (the same goes for biology, in my opinion), but just approach it like you would with the rest of your modules: Even if it seems hard at first, do it bit by bit and work hard, and you'll get it.
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Plain Marcus
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Hi DanielleLeahnora,


Having completed a BSc (Hons) Psychology degree, in addition to a Masters Degree in Statistics, and currently finishing off a PhD in Quantitative Psychology I feel I am at liberty to add my two cents here,

Generally speaking - The "maths" sides of things is predominantly based around statistics and data analysis. It takes a while to really understand some of the concepts but if you invest the time and effort into learning the fundamentals of statistics from the beginning, you shall be fine. The Undergraduate students I teach ("Research Methods" Module) didn't all have Maths at A-Level and they seemed to have coped well. Yes - lots of the statistical analysis you do is all through software (Either through software known as SPSS or 'R'), but no amount of software will help you truly understand or interpret your data. Furthermore, the exams in statistics are paper and pen based. You do come across several equations (some scary looking ones) but you don't have to reproduce them, so in a way, the actual 'mathematics' is only ever rudimentary. I would second what Magdatrix says, you start off quite basic and providing you invest time attempting to really understand what you are doing, you are unlikely to come across any major barriers. Some Universities have optional modules in 'Advance Statistics', but these are only optional and you won't need to concern yourself with these unless you glutton for punishment. In general, don't be put off my statistics. They are manageable and pretty much the backbone of Psychological and Social Research. I personally find it slightly unfair that Universities would require 'B' at GCSE. I only received a C at GCSE and I ended up acquiring over 70% in all statistical modules. Definitely don't be put off with the 'B' grade prerequisite.

Beyond statistics, there is a fair amount of biology involved, but many students on my BSc course didn't have A-Level Biology and they succeeded. Essentially, many of the 'biologically orientated' modules are essentially examining how biology factors into human behaviour and psychopathological processes. For instance, my modules included; "Biological Basis of Behavior" , "Neurobiology" and "Psycho-immunology". The course always starts off from the very beginning so you are introduced to the key terms and concepts at the beginning. Similar to statistics, invest time in independent learning (outside of lectures) and you will be fine.

In most cases no prior knowledge is ever really assumed for the modules. Attend all lectures, invest time to study independently and you will do absolutely fine.


Now for prospects of careers - well, that is a different kettle of fish!


Hope this helps.
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DanielleLeahnora
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(Original post by Plain Marcus)
Hi DanielleLeahnora,


Having completed a BSc (Hons) Psychology degree, in addition to a Masters Degree in Statistics, and currently finishing off a PhD in Quantitative Psychology I feel I am at liberty to add my two cents here,

Generally speaking - The "maths" sides of things is predominantly based around statistics and data analysis. It takes a while to really understand some of the concepts but if you invest the time and effort into learning the fundamentals of statistics from the beginning, you shall be fine. The Undergraduate students I teach ("Research Methods" Module) didn't all have Maths at A-Level and they seemed to have coped well. Yes - lots of the statistical analysis you do is all through software (Either through software known as SPSS or 'R', but no amount of software will help you truly understand or interpret your data. Furthermore, the exams in statistics are paper and pen based. You do come across several equations (some scary looking ones) but you don't have to reproduce them, so in a way, the actual 'mathematics' is only ever rudimentary. I would second what Magdatrix says, you start off quite basic and providing you invest time attempting to really understand what you are doing, you are unlikely to come across any major barriers. Some Universities have optional modules in 'Advance Statistics', but these are only optional and you won't need to concern yourself with these unless you glutton for punishment. In general, don't be put off my statistics. They are manageable and pretty much the backbone of Psychological and Social Research. I personally find it slightly unfair that Universities would require 'B' at GCSE. I only received a C at GCSE and I ended up acquiring over 70% in all statistical modules. Definitely don't be put off with the 'B' grade prerequisite.

Beyond statistics, there is a fair amount of biology involved, but many students on my BSc course didn't have A-Level Biology and they succeeded. Essentially, many of the 'biologically orientated' modules are essentially examining how biology factors into human behaviour and psychopathological processes. For instance, my modules included; "Biological Basis of Behavior" , "Neurobiology" and "Psycho-immunology". The course always starts off from the very beginning so you are introduced to the key terms and concepts at the beginning. Similar to statistics, invest time in independent learning (outside of lectures) and you will be fine.

In most cases no prior knowledge is ever really assumed for the modules. Attend all lectures, invest time to study independently and you will do absolutely fine.


Now for prospects of careers - well, that is a different kettle of fish!


Hope this helps.
Thankyou!! Helped loads! Feel so much better now, I want it enough so if I proper get my head down it shouldnt be too scary
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roomtobreathe
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Just to say: I know University of Liverpool only ask for a C in English and Maths for Psychology and they're quite a good university, especially if you want to go into forensics. I'm counting on them if I don't get the B I need for Manchester.
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Ani3113
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I have a Bachelors in Mathematics but would like to go ahead and do my masters in Psychology. What additionally required courses would be useful for my application?
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by Ani3113)
I have a Bachelors in Mathematics but would like to go ahead and do my masters in Psychology. What additionally required courses would be useful for my application?
You'd need an accredited conversion course (either in the form of a Masters or postgraduate diploma) to be eligible to join the British Psychological Society. Then you can apply for a Masters in Psychology.
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marinade
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(Original post by Ani3113)
I have a Bachelors in Mathematics but would like to go ahead and do my masters in Psychology. What additionally required courses would be useful for my application?
If you've got a year to do this, you could do some MOOCs or other distance learning courses relevant to the MSc. Usually not accredited but it might help with the application. It would depend what the MSc precisely is. You could could get on some Open University Psychology modules that might help, but they are very pricey these days.
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UniofReading
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
I have a B in biology GCSE and a C in Maths but a lot of courses seem to want a B in maths so now I'm scared there is a lot of maths that I won't be able to handle?! I can deal with maths as long as its not crazy stuff and I can deal with the science part if I put my head to it…also what good unis accept a C in maths if any?!

I study Psychology, English Language and Performance studies and out of all of them I would love to pursue psychology!
Hi,
One things which may also determine the content of science and mathematics in a psychology degree is whether it is listed as a BA or BSc - if listed as a BSc, it will have significant mathematical and scienitific components to it, and therefore is likely to require a B in maths. Whereas for those offering it as a BA there is a lower chance that there will be mathematical and scientific components focusing more upon the humanity side of psychology.

Both are extremely valid ways of studying psychology, but if you would like to pursue a career in psychology (into the research, clinical fields etc) then ensuring that the course is accrediated by the BPS (https://www.bps.org.uk/public/become...pe=UG&status=C) is a must to succeed without going through additional conversion courses!

I hope this helps!
Tom
Final Year Psychology and Student Ambassador
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raven48
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I'm a third year psych student!
It's mainly biological science that's the hard part the maths is pretty simple its just statistcs so if you can follow equations you will be fine with the tests, ours were mostly in class tests in first and second year for stats after that everything you wiil need to do stats will be on SPSS which can be a bit difficult to understand sometimes but there is plenty of help available if you need it. If you are worried make sure you brush up on your basic skills percentages, long division, pearson's correlation and spearman's rank are some things you can look at. Definately check out biology because that is a massive chunk of psychology particularly genetics, neuroscience etc. This is very basic in first year but can get a bit more complicated in second and third.

Other than that don't let anyone put you off. I just scraped a B in maths GCSE and in psychology A level and am managing just fine and have no regrets about taking this course, the only thing I will say is be prepared to work hard, the workload can be tough at times but it defeinately worth it .
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