demigawdz
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Hi may people please help and answer my questions as I am in need of some help... ?
Can someone also give some info about the Mathematics major course there.

I don't really know much about american unis or the application process.
Would MIT accept an English student with 3A*'s (At A2) in Maths, Further Maths and Additional Further Maths and 4 A's in AS( the same also with physics)...?

Would I get a scholarship as I'm international (to them)- but im not like from overseas or anything (like india for example..)?

Would they even look at my STEP and AEA scores or just their own.
(btw what do they ask for grade and entrance exam- wise)?
Also they have this weird major and minor thingy in America so can someone clear this up for me, ty.
Would the fact it's split up into 2 degrees affect how good it will be?
This is on the assumption that MIT is the best in America for maths (please tell me if I am wrong)
Thanks.
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username1763791
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(Original post by demigawdz)
Would I get a scholarship as I'm international (to them)- but im not like from overseas or anything (like india for example..)?
Lol, you are from overseas to them! This was a funnily worded sentence!
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demigawdz
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(Original post by Jordan\)
Lol, you are from overseas to them! This was a funnily worded sentence!
lol yh- any actual help though?
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demigawdz
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CrimsonDucati
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Hello Demi,

I'm doing the opposite of you. I'm a mature American planning on living and studying in England

American Universities are very different than the UK . Universities here admit based on many factors, not just academics, and this applies to even elite universities.

It's also 4 years here for a degree. You will be forced to take general education requirements, not just maths

A major is your main subject, and will have a list of requirements. A minor is not required, it's up to you if you wanna have a major and a minor. A minor requires less work than a major. It's not a dual degree

Very hard to get a scholarship as an international undergraduate student. You would need to be a gold medalist at the imo, or something similar.

You also apply to universities without specifying a major. All admits are free to choose whichever major they want, this is normally done after 2 years.

The standard first year maths courses btw might consist of courses you are already very familiar with. The average first year student in the United States has not specialized before university, and therefore might have a broader base of knowledge, but very few would be be able to deal with the maths required for a2 level maths and further maths.

The way maths is taught in the United States at the secondary level is different than pretty much everywhere else in the world. The textbooks tend to be awful, and discovery based. You have 4 years at what we call high school

Maths is not taught as an integrated subject , which undoubtedly contributes to our poor problem solving abilities. When we come across a problem that isn't pure algebra, or pure geometry, etc we don't know how to handle it.

I'll give a standard 4 year high school maths sequence

1st year Algebra 1
2nd year- Geometry
3rd year-Algebra 2 with Trigonometry,which can also be called Precalculus
4th year- Precalculus or Calculus

We do have AP tests, which like the UK, are exam based, but the only maths based AP exams are Calculus or Statistics. They are only 1 year courses, and you only take 1 exam

You also don't have conditional offers. You take your exams, and the scores are known before you apply to universities.

I greatly prefer the UK system. You know what you need to do in order to be an acceptable candidate. There's a lot of variables here which have nothing to do with your academic record

Your scores will definitely be recognized by universities here. MIT is known for maths, but so are Harvard, Princeton, Caltech,etc

We have an annual examination for American and Canadian undergraduates called the Putnam. Harvard has won it the most times , by far, and tiny Caltech is second

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William...al_Competition
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demigawdz
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(Original post by CrimsonDucati)
Hello Demi,

I'm doing the opposite of you. I'm a mature American planning on living and studying in England

American Universities are very different than the UK . Universities here admit based on many factors, not just academics, and this applies to even elite universities.

It's also 4 years here for a degree. You will be forced to take general education requirements, not just maths

A major is your main subject, and will have a list of requirements. A minor is not required, it's up to you if you wanna have a major and a minor. A minor requires less work than a major. It's not a dual degree

Very hard to get a scholarship as an international undergraduate student. You would need to be a gold medalist at the imo, or something similar.

You also apply to universities without specifying a major. All admits are free to choose whichever major they want, this is normally done after 2 years.

The standard first year maths courses btw might consist of courses you are already very familiar with. The average first year student in the United States has not specialized before university, and therefore might have a broader base of knowledge, but very few would be be able to deal with the maths required for a2 level maths and further maths.

The way maths is taught in the United States at the secondary level is different than pretty much everywhere else in the world. The textbooks tend to be awful, and discovery based. You have 4 years at what we call high school

Maths is not taught as an integrated subject , which undoubtedly contributes to our poor problem solving abilities. When we come across a problem that isn't pure algebra, or pure geometry, etc we don't know how to handle it.

I'll give a standard 4 year high school maths sequence

1st year Algebra 1
2nd year- Geometry
3rd year-Algebra 2 with Trigonometry,which can also be called Precalculus
4th year- Precalculus or Calculus

We do have AP tests, which like the UK, are exam based, but the only maths based AP exams are Calculus or Statistics. They are only 1 year courses, and you only take 1 exam

You also don't have conditional offers. You take your exams, and the scores are known before you apply to universities.

I greatly prefer the UK system. You know what you need to do in order to be an acceptable candidate. There's a lot of variables here which have nothing to do with your academic record

Your scores will definitely be recognized by universities here. MIT is known for maths, but so are Harvard, Princeton, Caltech,etc

We have an annual examination for American and Canadian undergraduates called the Putnam. Harvard has won it the most times , by far, and tiny Caltech is second

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William...al_Competition
thank you! this was very helpful
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CrimsonDucati
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no problem

Which UK universities are you applying to? What is additional further maths??? An exam board offers this>?
(Original post by demigawdz)
thank you! this was very helpful
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demigawdz
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(Original post by CrimsonDucati)
no problem

Which UK universities are you applying to? What is additional further maths??? An exam board offers this>?
There is Maths, Further maths and Additional further maths in the UK (for a-level)
it is essentially just finishing off all the modules in the a-level specification (It could be considered harder than the other 2)
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Mendeleev
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I kind of imagine that they'd be taking on the very best from overseas, such as those Chinese kids who get perfect scores in imo. But hey, you're certainly going to have more of a chance applying than not applying so give it a shot.
In terms of actual tips, I don't really know, I considered US universities in year 12 and I know you have to do some extra tests.
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