Early waves of settlers of North America Watch

NJA
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Are there any percentages for reasons people settled in North America in the 16th & 17th century?

i.e. what proportion / percentage was (a) opportunity to get wealth (b) fleeing persecution (c) just wanting a better life
0
reply
gordonbennetton
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
a) 23.467% b) 16.364% c) 56.826%
0
reply
DJKL
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
A real mix of reasons, I suspect. . Have a look at articles in the AHR (American History Review). A long time ago I wrote an essay on indentured servitude and its impact on american migration/ labour needs and think I sourced a fair bit of data from AHR papers.

By the way why 16th and 17th century, I would have thought 17th and 18th century would be more appropriate?

The initial key issue with the colonies was manpower, vast tracts of land to be tamed but much to the disquiet of the early settlers the Native Americans were not very keen to provide the necessary labour the colonists needed to exploit the abundant land, indenture accordingly went a long way to initially filling this void (land being the reward post the indenture period) and of course slavery also became a significant source of labour.

You may be interested that possibly initially Africans were in some cases also indentured servants and were freed after their period of indenture but over time the position of Africans changed.

The textbook we used to provide an outline was "A Concise History of The American Republic" which is a useful place to start; use the citations to track appropriate journal articles. It is not that cheap new but a secondhand copy would probably be good enough.

A Concise History of the American Republic Paperback – 26 May 1983
by Samuel Eliot Morison (Author), Henry Steele Commager (Author), William E. Leuchtenburg (Author)
0
reply
NJA
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by DJKL)
...
By the way why 16th and 17th century, I would have thought 17th and 18th century would be more appropriate?
Yes, 16th was hardly waves. 19th should also be looked at.

The question arose when I saw these Comemorative stamps ...
Attached files
0
reply
DJKL
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by NJA)
Yes, 16th was hardly waves. 19th should also be looked at.

The question arose when I saw these Comemorative stamps ...
Yes, the Swedish influx in the main appears to be the 19th century. Again, chasing land . (Whilst Sweden has a large land mass per capita a lot of it has limited arable use-there are however fast areas of forest)

You should also consider Scotland from 18th century onwards (clearances) and Ireland especially in the 19th century( famine)
0
reply
NJA
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by DJKL)
Yes, the Swedish influx in the main appears to be the 19th century. Again, chasing land . (Whilst Sweden has a large land mass per capita a lot of it has limited arable use-there are however fast areas of forest)

You should also consider Scotland from 18th century onwards (clearances) and Ireland especially in the 19th century( famine)
How accurate would you say "Gangs of New York" was to the situation there?

I see there has been a documentary.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (134)
18.23%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (73)
9.93%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (127)
17.28%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (105)
14.29%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (72)
9.8%
How can I be the best version of myself? (224)
30.48%

Watched Threads

View All