cherryblossoming
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I would love to study Law at Oxford University, and I was just wondering if anyone had any recommendations on how to improve the quality of knowledge about the course, and any good wider reading to stimulate passion about the subject. I am very passionate about studying Law, but I just would like to raise the question that how does one showcase passion for a degree course?
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jenkinsear
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(Original post by cherryblossoming)
I would love to study Law at Oxford University, and I was just wondering if anyone had any recommendations on how to improve the quality of knowledge about the course, and any good wider reading to stimulate passion about the subject. I am very passionate about studying Law, but I just would like to raise the question that how does one showcase passion for a degree course?
What areas of law are you particularly interested in?

My general, beginning of the process suggestions tend to be something like "The Rule of Law" by Tom Bingham (easy enough to read, most tutors are aware of it and it's seen as a respectable enough choice), something Juris related (JS Mills "on liberty", Hart's "Concept of law"- though far too many people perhaps put the latter on their personal statement) and then something on something you're particularly interested in like family law or human rights. I can provide suggestions on whatever specific areas you are interested in via PM if you wish.

Edit:

Few other things. In terms of knowledge of the course, I'd go in there actually understanding the structure of the Jurisprudence degree (e.g. compulsory modules, when you pick options, what they can be, what topics are covered in the core subjects perhaps) because surprisingly few people seem to do this. Easily found out reading through the Oxford law website.

In terms of conveying passion, part of it is obviously how you come across at interview. In terms of the personal statement, the advice I always give is to make sure you're actually giving your opinions about what you've read and not just saying something like "Dworkin's definition of culpability was x which I found interesting". Say why. Say if you think he missed something or should have gone further or screwed up his definitions of key elements of his argument. It's basically an opportunity for you to show the tutor that you can critically assess something and come up with your own ideas on the basis of the material you've read. You tend to be on the right lines in an interview when a tutor says "I found this comment in your personal statement really interesting, tell me more about y".
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cherryblossoming
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(Original post by jenkinsear)
What areas of law are you particularly interested in?

My general, beginning of the process suggestions tend to be something like "The Rule of Law" by Tom Bingham (easy enough to read, most tutors are aware of it and it's seen as a respectable enough choice), something Juris related (JS Mills "on liberty", Hart's "Concept of law"- though far too many people perhaps put the latter on their personal statement) and then something on something you're particularly interested in like family law or human rights. I can provide suggestions on whatever specific areas you are interested in via PM if you wish.

Edit:

Few other things. In terms of knowledge of the course, I'd go in there actually understanding the structure of the Jurisprudence degree (e.g. compulsory modules, when you pick options, what they can be, what topics are covered in the core subjects perhaps) because surprisingly few people seem to do this. Easily found out reading through the Oxford law website.

In terms of conveying passion, part of it is obviously how you come across at interview. In terms of the personal statement, the advice I always give is to make sure you're actually giving your opinions about what you've read and not just saying something like "Dworkin's definition of culpability was x which I found interesting". Say why. Say if you think he missed something or should have gone further or screwed up his definitions of key elements of his argument. It's basically an opportunity for you to show the tutor that you can critically assess something and come up with your own ideas on the basis of the material you've read. You tend to be on the right lines in an interview when a tutor says "I found this comment in your personal statement really interesting, tell me more about y".

Thank you! I've already started reading reading What about Law? by Barnard, O'Sullivan and Virgo and Letters to a Law Student by McBridge. I'll also check out your recommended books. :borat:

As for specific areas of law, I, at the moment, haven't really gotten around to that (in all honesty, though, I do have an ample amount of time regarding the fact that I am only 15 years old). I think Criminal Law would be interesting but I think I'm only veering towards that area because of the whole 'exciting' element of defending/prosecuting criminals etc. Corporate/Company Law also seems interesting and I might get some books on that, but that also may be because of my complex for the 'glamourous world' and the stereotypical image in my mind of big businesses equaling large, prestigious firms with glass architecture and the lot. But when I do need any help on that, I'll definitely PM you for some recommendations!
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