Rob_19
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Hi everyone I have done a BSc Psychology undergraduate course and I have just finished my last year. I started to think about of any possible careers and I have always had a passion for medicine. The Graduate Entry in Medicine seems promising but there are a couple of factors to consider as well. I enjoy working along side people, and that's one of the reasons why I studied psychology apart from other things. I enjoy having to watch all the steps and progress of clients and see the help you give each step. But I don't like the full close relationship with the client and that's why I started to think of combining psychology with medicine and trying to find a career that does not require full close relationship with the client and just a few minutes contact with the client where you cannot see the progress of your help.Sorry, it may sound confusing!! I am really struggling to find a career that is in between and is both psychological and medical . I was interested in psychiatry but it takes a lot of years to become one and clinical psychology was not recommended due to the high number of people applying to it.
So... if anyone can help, it would be absolutely useful!!

Thanks a lot
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Sinatrafan
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It's an interesting career quality that you're looking for, most people within medicine are frustrated by the lack of time they get with their patients and the lack of care continuity; it's normally top of most people's grievances within the profession.

All medical specialties take an equally long time to train in (10-15 years). You disregarded psychiatry in your post on that basis, so I'm assuming by medical career you may in fact mean healthcare career?

I think you're very wise to be giving clinical psychology a wide berth. I have many friends who have still been unable to get on a clinical psychology training program 8 years on from our graduation.

Excluding clinical psychology and psychiatry/medicine, in terms of combining mental health/health care you're left with;

- Occupational therapist working in a mental health setting
- Mental health nurse

Social work won't involve any medicine and other health care professions (nursing, ODP, radiography, physiotherapy etc) won't involve any psychology/mental health. So they would appear to be your best fit.
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Rob_19
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(Original post by Sinatrafan)
It's an interesting career quality that you're looking for, most people within medicine are frustrated by the lack of time they get with their patients and the lack of care continuity; it's normally top of most people's grievances within the profession.

All medical specialties take an equally long time to train in (10-15 years). You disregarded psychiatry in your post on that basis, so I'm assuming by medical career you may in fact mean healthcare career?

I think you're very wise to be giving clinical psychology a wide berth. I have many friends who have still been unable to get on a clinical psychology training program 8 years on from our graduation.

Excluding clinical psychology and psychiatry/medicine, in terms of combining mental health/health care you're left with;

- Occupational therapist working in a mental health setting
- Mental health nurse

Social work won't involve any medicine and other health care professions (nursing, ODP, radiography, physiotherapy etc) won't involve any psychology/mental health. So they would appear to be your best fit.
Thank you for your answer. Your post has been really helpful! Well, I haven't disregarded psychiatry completely but the length of training is putting me off a little and yes, am interested in healthcare career.

How does an occupational therapist link with the medical part? As far as I am aware of, it is not treating the client but rather improving the life.. if that makes sense?

I will try and look through mental health nurse. I have also thought about psychotherapy but it is theoretically based and I am trying to find something based on both practical and theoretical.
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Sinatrafan
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My pleasure. OTs link in with the wider multidisciplinary team that looks after mental health patients. They typically work in a hospital setting and work alongside the nurses, psychologists and doctors caring for a patient. It certainly isn't directly medical, but they work in the same setting and complement the medical team. They also have a fairly good balance in terms of contact time with each patient (probably less than a psychologist but more than a doctor). It may not be a perfect choice if you are medically inclined, but it's certainly an option.

In terms of psychotherapy I wrote this to another OP a few ago.

"Psychotherapy is a very non-specific term and may refer to things such as;

- Cognitive behavioural therapy
- Psychoanalysis/psychodynamic therapy
- Family therapy
- Cognitive analytical therapy

The main people who undertake these therapies are;

- Clinical psychologists
- Forensic psychologists
- Psychiatrists (psychotherapy is a sub-speciality within psychiatry and all psychiatry trainees will train in psychotherapies during their training)
- Mental health nurses trained in some basic CBT"

There are ways around it like studying counselling and what not, but really to do psychotherapies in the proper fashion it is the domain of psychologists and psychiatrists; both of which require the long training pathway.

Medicine is a great career to go in to, but aside from being prepare to commit to the long training you also have to like medicine a lot and be prepare to do 6 years of general medicine and surgery before you get the chance to pursue psychiatry. You need to enjoy the process rather than just use it as a means to an end, otherwise it won't be worth it and will drive you mad.
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Rob_19
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(Original post by Sinatrafan)
My pleasure. OTs link in with the wider multidisciplinary team that looks after mental health patients. They typically work in a hospital setting and work alongside the nurses, psychologists and doctors caring for a patient. It certainly isn't directly medical, but they work in the same setting and complement the medical team. They also have a fairly good balance in terms of contact time with each patient (probably less than a psychologist but more than a doctor). It may not be a perfect choice if you are medically inclined, but it's certainly an option.

In terms of psychotherapy I wrote this to another OP a few ago.

"Psychotherapy is a very non-specific term and may refer to things such as;

- Cognitive behavioural therapy
- Psychoanalysis/psychodynamic therapy
- Family therapy
- Cognitive analytical therapy

The main people who undertake these therapies are;

- Clinical psychologists
- Forensic psychologists
- Psychiatrists (psychotherapy is a sub-speciality within psychiatry and all psychiatry trainees will train in psychotherapies during their training)
- Mental health nurses trained in some basic CBT"

There are ways around it like studying counselling and what not, but really to do psychotherapies in the proper fashion it is the domain of psychologists and psychiatrists; both of which require the long training pathway.

Medicine is a great career to go in to, but aside from being prepare to commit to the long training you also have to like medicine a lot and be prepare to do 6 years of general medicine and surgery before you get the chance to pursue psychiatry. You need to enjoy the process rather than just use it as a means to an end, otherwise it won't be worth it and will drive you mad.
Thank you for your reply. Well, OT does not sound so bad but what is kind of putting me off is that it is not that clinically related. I was thinking also about whether a mental health nurse can shift to OT.

I was also thinking about clinical neuropsychology. But I'm not sure whether this is part of the clinical psychology process and if it is really tough to get into. I enjoy it and it is quite clinically related

That is true with regards to taking medicine as a career. It is a very hard decision to make as you can't know until you actually experience the course if it is right for you! That is why I'm thinking of alternatives that are more clinical rather than fully theoretically based, as that is not what I would prefer. So rather more clinically related.

Thanks!
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