jackyboy17
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The reason for alkali metals being more reactive the further down the group they go is because they have more shells of electrons which means the last shell has a weak pull from the positive nucleus so can be easily lost. In this case surely that should be said for all groups as all groups gain another outer shell of electrons as they go down the table. However the halogens for example get less reactive as they go down the group. Can someone explain why every group doesn't get more reactive as they go down thw group like the alkali metals? Thanks!
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GrappleX
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(Original post by jackyboy17)
The reason for alkali metals being more reactive the further down the group they go is because they have more shells of electrons which means the last shell has a weak pull from the positive nucleus so can be easily lost. In this case surely that should be said for all groups as all groups gain another outer shell of electrons as they go down the table. However the halogens for example get less reactive as they go down the group. Can someone explain why every group doesn't get more reactive as they go down thw group like the alkali metals? Thanks!
The Halogens, for example, Form negative anions, rather than positive cations, like metals do. This is due to the Numbers of Electrons in the valence (outer) Shell. If the Shell is almost complete i.e 7 electrons for the halogens, it is much 'easier' for them to accept an electron and become a anion, than lose electrons and form cations. As u go down group 7 the valence electrons are further away from the nucleus, so electrons to be donated are not as strongly attacted, hence why the halogens become less reactive as you go down the group! How this helps


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spnlove
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(Original post by jackyboy17)
The reason for alkali metals being more reactive the further down the group they go is because they have more shells of electrons which means the last shell has a weak pull from the positive nucleus so can be easily lost. In this case surely that should be said for all groups as all groups gain another outer shell of electrons as they go down the table. However the halogens for example get less reactive as they go down the group. Can someone explain why every group doesn't get more reactive as they go down thw group like the alkali metals? Thanks!
I don't know about all the groups but for halogens they get less reactive as they go down because they are trying to gain electrons rather than lose them. As there are more shells the further you go down, there is less attraction between the outer shell and the nucleus. This means that it is harder to attract electrons and pull them in so elements further down are less reactive.
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jackyboy17
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Ahh thanks guys I understand now! 👌
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