Is Judo the most useless martial art for self defense? Watch

FunkItsMechanics
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#1
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Like, slowly grab someone and grapple them completely useless for self defense, they punch you once and you are knocked out you dont have time to do your slowpoke fancy throws and pins on them

the only pro I can see is that you can pin someone without hurting them so you wont be as likely to get in trouble if you end up fighting
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Scoobiedoobiedo
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Every martial art has weaknesses when it comes to self defence. Judo is probably more useful than boxing though.
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ALevelBro
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(Original post by Scoobiedoobiedo)
Every martial art has weaknesses when it comes to self defence. Judo is probably more useful than boxing though.
Unless you're highly experienced... I doubt it.
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whorace
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Obv never done Judo, you can take down big and fat ****ers with very little strength, since the only time I ever get in a fight involves knocking someone to the floor this definitely comes in use.
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Illidan_Stormrage
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Surely doing all the throws slowly is just for the sake of learning. You're supposed to do them very quickly without even having to think about it. Most fights end up with a clinch at some point so judo should prove useful. I did wadokai karate for quite a few years and got up to a purple belt. Never got in a fight during that time but looking at the moves I learned most of them at least seemed to be useless. The useful moves were the basic kicks and punches that I learned in the beginning stages.
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marlenehawthorne
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I've done judo since I wa 5. It's creator intended it to be based on self defense and you clearly don't know much about it. In kata(is that how you spell it?)We learn what to do if someone goes to punch you, attacks you with a knife or kicks. And of course you don't do the throws in slow motion -.- you simply learn them slowly so you know what you're doing. Look up kata or even just watch any high level fight and you'll see that it's extremely useful in self defense. I won't say it's the best because I don't know much about the others so I'm not going to make any snap judgements, but all of judo is based upon reacting to attackers so you are unfortunately very wrong.
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BKS
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There's an argument that martial arts at all don't hugely prepare you for self defence and if you want to you should specifically train self defence. You spar and train within set rules, there is a limited range of possibilities that will happen within a specified time. It doesn't teach you de-escalation and if it does get physical coping with the stress to think well enough to be useful. What any (well, I assume having never checked them all) martial art will teach you is how to move, see opportunities and hit hard. But your actual techniques are only really useful if you do them reflexively (cause our brain is all stressed and not working well) which takes several years.
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PetrosAC
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My Step-Brother's a black-belt in Judo and it's saved his skin a few times. It's based on Self-Defence

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Straighthate
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(Original post by Scoobiedoobiedo)
Every martial art has weaknesses when it comes to self defence. Judo is probably more useful than boxing though.
u wot
the worst place to be in a street fight is the floor, where assailants will stomp your skull in
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The Blind Monk
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I don't really have the time to address the issue fully but as with so many things in life it depends on what you mean by 'self defence.' Fighting is only one aspect of self defence and possibly the least important for the majority of people who are likely to read this post. Other factors such as not being in a dive bar at 3am, body language, knowing how and when to de-escalate the situation, not having the ego to go fight over petty **** and general conflict avoidance are all more important than learning how to fight.

Is being good at fighting a nice insurance policy in these sorts of situations? Absolutely. But it should not be the first thing in any actual 'defence' situation.

Many of the benefits of fight sports such as Judo/Wrestling/Boxing/Brazilian Jiu Jitsu come from the 'aliveness' of it (as Matt Thornton would put it.) You would become used to pressure testing your skills against resisting opponents. It would help to prepare you for the adrenaline dump of an actual confrontation. With regards to Judo specifically, being dumped with a big throw like Uchimata/Seoi Nage/Osoto Gari is pretty unpleasant on a sprung floor. I can only imagine how horrible it would be on concrete. The point is that Judo is taught primarily as a sport (the majority of the time.) The atemi-waza (striking) is basically not taught to the majority of people so we will ignore that. There are other issues such as you can expose your back and still achieve ippon, which is potentially dangerous if the throw does not damage your opponent massively. The training method is only in the gi/kimono so some people are very reliant on that collar/sleeve grip instead of the wrestling/no gi over/underhooks/collar ties etc. The learning curve for judo is also very, very steep. But is it useless? That's very unlikely. The break-falling skills would be useful if nothing else.

Here is the Matt Thornton video in question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Le3IUKp0I_o
Here is a good example of judo in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRTsabfMTgs

The gifted internet troll Shen (a legitimate BJJ black belt) explains it quite well here in relation to the street v sport discussion that creeps into so many Brazilian Jiu Jitsu conversations on the internet: http://www.reddit.com/r/bjj/comments...rence_between/
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FrostShot
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Fun fact: Lots of Judo's throws were actually a bi-product of war in Japan in the past, where the Samurai were so heavily armored that once you threw them on the ground they couldn't get up again.
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Daigan
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Doesn't Ronda Rousey specialize in Judo? If so, it's led her to be formidable in the octagon. So it can't be all bad.
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Arkasia
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The strongest form is Kung Fury.
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Man.bear.pig
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(Original post by Straighthate)
u wot
the worst place to be in a street fight is the floor, where assailants will stomp your skull in
have you ever seen judo? The judo i've seen was standing up and for quite a long time. If someone wants to fight you like boxing or some stupid sluggy **** outside the pub, they can't even get to your face because you did some quick bob and weave and tackle and body slam technique. Yea it's elaborate but it's useful, it's saved my ass and I don't even do judo so I can imagine if I or anyone did. I actually fantasize all the time about having the opportunity to learn it and getting a black belt in front of everyone and being all ripped lol
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Man.bear.pig
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I actually think the opposite OP. I think everyone, man, woman, child should learn some form of martial arts discipline. There's sooo many I can't possibly cover them. Pen silat from indonesia, muay thai from thailand, brazilian jujitsu and capoeira, taekwondo from Korea, tameshiwari in karate, tai qi, aikido...I mean just learning can get you to think differently, breathe differently, walk differently, interact differently. Knowing you have these skills in your back pocket you feel much better about yourself. Martial arts isn't solely to kick someone's ass, sometimes it's just about skill. In fact, training isn't all like a Bruce Lee film all action packed and dramatic, it's a lot of repetition of building strength and breathing properly and learning balance, learning strikes and grappling, it's cumbersome and arduous but I'm sure worth it. Martial arts is about the lifestyle and the discipline and respect and honour. Ok I'm getting all Mulan.
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FunkItsMechanics
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#16
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lol at people that actually think Judo can beat punches and kicks
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SEHughes
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The OP should go to a judo gym and try to not get taken down hard by a black belt. He should also do it without a mat.
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castlehill
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Not at all. Every street fight I've ever been in or seen has included a wrestling struggle at some point, that's when judo works well. Of you're talking about ma vs ma though, you would have to train your judo as defense against punches and kicks specifically. Works both ways though, because tae kwon do etc don't spend much time training how to defend against being grabbed or tackled and people who specialise in striking don't like being grabbed and would ideally like to break the grapple and move away so that they can use their best techniques more effectively.
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SmashConcept
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(Original post by SEHughes)
The OP should go to a judo gym and try to not get taken down hard by a black belt. He should also do it without a mat.
To be honest a lot of smaller 1st dans would struggle to throw someone who lifts and is a decent athlete.
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castlehill
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(Original post by SmashConcept)
To be honest a lot of smaller 1st dans would struggle to throw someone who lifts and is a decent athlete.
You're thinking of force vs force. If you get the technique right, it's really not difficult to throw a bigger person. Tripping the leg with ko uchi gari for example, the most basic front leg trip. Even if you're talking about hip and shoulder throws, the key is to first get underneath your opponent and unbalance him, if you get that right then throwing someone is a piece of piss, and a smaller person actually has an advantage. That's one of the principles of good judo, turning an opponents advantages (size) into disadvantages.
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