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AQA English Language and Literature - ELLB3 - June 11th 2015 watch

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    Hey everyone!

    I couldn't find a thread already open for this exam (slightly worrying), so thought I would create one.

    I was wondering if anyone had a structure on how to answer section A (seen texts) of the exam? I'm doing king Lear, but any structural approach would help.

    I have a plan for the unseen section B which I am willing to share if anyone needs it?

    Good luck with all your exams!
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    Hi man, mind if I have a look at your section B plan, i'm pretty stuck on structure.
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    The unseen plan I have is:

    P1. Introduction:
    Outline of the text, the purpose and the audience, so for the talk in life the audience will just be the speakers unless it's a recorded conversation.

    P2. Talk in life:
    Talk about features that have been used to represent talk in life, so non fluency features, adjacency pairs, interruptions etc.

    P3. Theorists:
    Apply two or three theories to each text, from grices maxims to lakoffs politeness principles etc.

    P4. Attitudes and values:
    This is the section where you try and say what you haven't so far. Talk about what a person's characteristics are like, and how they may feel in terms if relationships being shown. Use of imperatives etc.

    P5. Conclusion:
    Was the conversation as we expected? The right schema etc? And a brief summary of what the text shows.

    Always compare throughout, and make sure you don't make the mistake of talking about section B as a piece of real text. Always refer to author, what this shows and purpose.

    Hope this helps!
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    Thanks so much this was so helpful
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    (Original post by sprinx)
    Thanks so much this was so helpful
    No worries. What are you doing for section A?
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    For section A I'm doing The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Personally I find section A a whole lot easier as roughly the same points can be drawn out of the text and then simply applied to the steer. Section B is horrible, I worry that I'll get a poem and completely misunderstand an underlying message.
    How have you been revising for both? Just Past papers?
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    (Original post by sprinxd)
    For section A I'm doing The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Personally I find section A a whole lot easier as roughly the same points can be drawn out of the text and then simply applied to the steer. Section B is horrible, I worry that I'll get a poem and completely misunderstand an underlying message.
    How have you been revising for both? Just Past papers?
    Yeah, i agree section is easier. I just don't have a structure. I don't suppose you do?
    Section B, if its a nice group of texts, can be okay. It's timings for me. And yes I've just been doing past papers. I have literally just done one with a poem, and it did not go well. Is that how you're revising?
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    I don't really have a set structure for section A but roughly:
    Intro: where the extract is situated within the text/play - its significance. What happened directly beforehand and how that adds to the extract. Authors intentions link to steer. How the steer is a key aspect within the play/text as a whole. For instance if the steer is "attitudes to witchcraft" I would say something along the lines of "The dogmatic fear of witches within 16th century theocratic Salem generates suspicion and terror which culminates in Salem's tragic ending" etc.

    My main body is usually split conceptually i.e. Literary, Linguistic, Attitudes and values. Hard to explain, I normally improvise slightly within the exam. Literary might include imagery, recurring motifs,religious symbolism, paralinguistic features etc. Linguistic focuses on the actual speech of the characters - how they convey their attitudes to the steer,

    I also normally have a paragraph linking the play to the McCarthyism era, not available with all texts but with The Crucible it's an easy way to pick up marks. For instance "Due to the allegorical nature of The Crucible.....The fearful association with witchcraft in Salem mirrors the same attitudes towards communism present throughout 1960's "Red Scare" America...

    Like you said, bring in a few theories, such as Maxims, Goffman's dramaturgical theorem. Additionally slapping on a Marxist or feminist perspective at the end of a point can be beneficial. For a steer such as "conflict in the community" we might link Marxist principles i.e lack of social hierarchy and compare to theocratic Salem etc. Note that this shouldn't be a full blown paragraph and more of an addition.

    In the conclusion I've been told to try and link the steer to the tragic ending of the play. How it adds to the ruin of Salem for instance. No need for a real conclusion as we only have an hour to write.

    - I've mostly been revising by past papers, need to do some today
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    I am also doing 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller. For our unseen structure we were advised to

    1- Introduction - find the common link and look at context, audience and purpose.
    2- Structure
    3- Fluency features
    4- Register and Lexis
    5- Narrative voice, if applicable
    6- Attitudes and values
    7- Conclusion

    Then throughout each, link together; maybe doing text A first then text B but referring to common links.

    I am really worried about this exam aha
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    Would someone be able to help me give terms to these quotes ASAP

    "bought me with a handful of coloured stones and the pelts of dead beasts"

    "When I said that I would marry him..he let out a long extinguished sigh. I though "Oh! how he must want me."

    "my heart swelled and ached so during the Liebestod I thought I must truly love him"

    "Strumming the bars of the cage: she likes to hear it announce how it cannot escape."

    "I clung to him as though only the one who inflicted the pain could comfort me for suffering it."

    "Yet she always seemed wild, impatient of temper, capricious of temper"

    "My eagle-featured indomitable mother"

    "maternal justice"

    "The mountaineers child"

    "cobra-headed"

    "his eyes were singularly sweet"


    Thanks
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    my teachers are amazing and so we've never actually done a proper mock for this exam

    Would it be better to do the comparison of the two texts before doing the crucible one?

    Stressing soo bad for this exam! I retook the AS exam so I'm praying that I do well in both!!
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    (Original post by sprinxd)
    For section A I'm doing The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Personally I find section A a whole lot easier as roughly the same points can be drawn out of the text and then simply applied to the steer. Section B is horrible, I worry that I'll get a poem and completely misunderstand an underlying message.
    How have you been revising for both? Just Past papers?
    Im doing the Crucible too so scared for tomorrow!! xxx
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    What's everyone doing for revision this afternoon? I find I can't get motivated to properly plan past papers like I would in the exam so I'm just writing out a rough structure for my answer, memorising key terms and reading about my part A text on spark notes.

    Any tips?
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    We split it into 3 different sections of indicative content which goes by the mark scheme:

    1) Links accross play & explanation of steer
    2) Context (audience(s) & purpose(s)) and dramatic situation (how this is presented as a stage play)
    3) Discourse conventions (Language stuff I.e. Number of turns, sentence/utterance types, conversation theorists)
    4) Language/ Literary/ Rhetorical features (similes, metaphors, imagery, lexical choices etc)

    These aren't necessarily seperate paragraphs but once you make a plan, it all falls into obvious sections. For example; links accross play, explanation of steer and context would all be in the introductory paragraph and throughout, discourse conventions would be one paragraph and Lang/lit/rhet would be another paragraph with dramatic situation running throughout also
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    I have a plan that I use for the unseen, it usually gets me 45 or over so I thought I would share it!

    Intro - outline context of each text, key similarities and differences. Brief overview of purposes, liking to tone.

    Conventions and schema - relate each text to how it meets the expectations of its form. I.e. an interview follows a question and answer structure, and adheres to the polite conventions of a conversation. Within this, integrate comparisons - there will usually be key similarities in the schema that you can compare. Outline purpose (this is something done all the way through essay. Quote and analyse quotes, using theory to support.

    Attitudes of all speakers, in both texts. Something which you will usually draw many similarities in both texts from. Make sure you analyse the attitudes of ALL the speakers, comparing throughout this section, using quotes to support.

    Structures of each text. Outline that whilst one text is spontaneous (transcribed) the other is crafted - i.e. an extract from a novel, a poem, therefore this is one key difference. Similarly, the writer of the crafted piece may have selected features of spontaneous talk to give the impression of an ephemeral discourse - compare the features used in both texts. This is where you can link to narrative voice, if applicable.

    Briefly describe the key similarities and differences between talk in real life, and talk in crafted speech. Reiterate how the features used in both texts, help the speakers/writers to achieve their purposes. Link to the key contextual similarity that will be evident in both texts.

    Conclusion - only has to be a couple of lines. Conclude, that whilst the two texts are similar contextually, fundamentally they are different due to varying forms and purposes (one or two examples).

    hope this helps anyone (it helps me to revise the structure even if no one reads this)
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    also, we never really learned a clear structure for section A. However, I always use topic sentences to form my essay, depending on the steer this is always different.
    Intro always begins by outlining the position of the extract, how the events link to the steer, as well as any contextual links that you can make.
    I'll then go on to start my essay like this:
    (we studied The Crucible)
    One way that miller presents the theme of....is through the use of.../ the way that (character) speaks in a... tone, for example. I'll probably do about 3 or 4 of these paragraphs.
    I might also follow a chronological approach to the extract, if the theme develops throughout the extract.
    "Initially, the theme of .... is presented through the way that... as the extract develops/progresses, this becomes more evident through... is more prominent" I find this works quite well on a question about relationships.

    It's quite hard to structure the part A without knowing the extract, any other alternatives would be appreciated if anyone has any!
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    Hi everyone, ive got this exam tomorrow and im doing the crucible. im so nervous tbh. just hope it goes well *sigh*
    for the crucible the structure really depends on the steer but usually in the intro i talk about the point in the play and then key features such as power relations, imagery, nouns/adjectives, stage directions and so on
    and for the unseen i follow: 1) intro as someone stated above 2) differences in talk in life and literature so basically NNFF, adjacency pairs, so on 3) usually i talk about power, politeness, authority so the politeness theory and maxim come on well here, maybe even goffman, so for the second text this can be linked to characterisation 4) purposes and audience, maybe sometimes the ending, linking back to the other points 5) attitudes and values, if they change or not, again link back to the author's intentions with the character and so on 6) ending of text if not already mentioned, how they are similar or different, link back to A/V and drama aspect of it i.e. could create tension, or humour, and its impact on the audience
    its important to keep remembering the authorial purpose of the second text
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    hey does anyone have any things i could look out for if its a play in the unseen?? my teacher said remember the performance aspect of it, but .. im not too sure.. last years was a poem, year before that was a novel extract so a play could come up .. so any points u could recommend ?
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    So I've basically accepted the fact that I'm failing this exam but I was wondering what some theories were and if anyone could explain them to me, I know Grices Maxims but that's it!
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    (Original post by amy741)
    So I've basically accepted the fact that I'm failing this exam but I was wondering what some theories were and if anyone could explain them to me, I know Grices Maxims but that's it!
    don't panic you won't fail!!

    Theories are really simple to get your head around, and only need to be used in the essay a few times, so only a small proportion of the essay. But they do help you to get extra credit.
    Probably one of the most useful to apply is the gender theory, it can probably be used for most texts, as is face theory.
    Look up, Tannen's difference theory, and Lakoff theory.

    Face can be applied really easily, too. Most of the time, in conversation each speaker will try to maintain their own personal 'face', by the actions that they take. For example, they may compliment to preserve both their own reputation, and make the other speaker look good. The speaker may threaten the face (face threatening act), and choose to violate the conventions of the discourse, by potentially offending the other speaker. This can be softened by the use of positive and negative face. (this link is useful http://www.slideshare.net/indralovem...tic-politeness)
    Also Labov's narrative structure, can be applied to most literary texts, and useful to talk about the structure element of the essay. http://meganpower.blogspot.co.uk/201...rytelling.html
    feel free to PM me if you need anymore help, I happen to love English, so will be happy to help you.
 
 
 
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