Do you know the difference between a noun, verb, and adjective?

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Isambard Kingdom Brunel
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There is a red car.

Please inform me what is what in the sentence above. Is RED the adjective and CAR the noun?

So what's a verb?
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BCMFM16
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(Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
There is a red car.

Please inform me what is what in the sentence above. Is RED the adjective and CAR the noun?

So what's a verb?
A "doing" word...?


This is year 3 man...smh
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Isambard Kingdom Brunel
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(Original post by BCMFM16)
A "doing" word...?


This is year 3 man...smh
I am a teacher in training, yet I don't know this kind of stuff.

So what is the word "CAR"?

And if an adjective modifies a noun, would that be "RED"?
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TheonlyMrsHolmes
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'is' is a verb, it is a verb to be in the present tense.
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shawn_o1
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These can be any of the 3:

hurt
fit
right
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
There is a red car.

Please inform me what is what in the sentence above. Is RED the adjective and CAR the noun?

So what's a verb?
This is what you should have learned in primary school.

There adverb (modifies the verb - where is it? There!)
is verb (describes what is being done - it exists)
a indefinite article (nonspecific determiner - indicates that only one car "is")
red adjective (modifies the noun - the car has a particular property)
car noun (the thing being talked about)
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lerjj
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This is an interesting troll post

This - determiner

is - verb

an - (indefinite) article

interesting - adjective

troll - probably an adjective. Did you know that adjectives have an informally defined order?This is a troll interesting post makes no sense but doesn't violate any actual rules.

post - noun

Just type 'parts of speech in English' into Google :adore:
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German123
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They are the basics of English


Edit: Adjective-describing word
adverb-how stuff are done.....basically ly words like softly, quickly
Noun-place or a thing or name.
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Isambard Kingdom Brunel
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(Original post by German123)
They are the basics of English


EditAdjective-describing word
adverb-how stuff are done.....basically ly words like softly, quickly
Noun-place or a thing or name.
And if you were a teacher going abroad to teach kids their first ever lessons in English, then you need to make sure you know what you are talking about, hence why I am asking.

Of course I learnt it all in primary school, but jeez, a lot's happened since then...

Knowing it as a fluent speaker is one thing, but when you have to explain it to other people it can get difficult...
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Good bloke
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(Original post by lerjj)
This - (definite) article
Ahem. "This" is a determiner, usually a pronoun but can be used as an adverb, and is not an article, definite or otherwise.
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German123
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(Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
And if you were a teacher going abroad to teach kids their first ever lessons in English, then you need to make sure you know what you are talking about, hence why I am asking.

Of course I learnt it all in primary school, but jeez, a lot's happened since then...

Knowing it as a fluent speaker is one thing, but when you have to explain it to other people it can get difficult...
Exactly this.
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lerjj
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Ahem. "This" is a determiner, usually a pronoun but can be used as an adverb, and is not an article, definite or otherwise.
Dammit. The 'this' in "this magnet" would be a definite article though I'm assuming? I actually looked this up, saw determiner on Wikipedia, and due to somewhat ambiguous wording thought it was an American variation on the word article.

What part of speech is 'dammit', by the way?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by lerjj)
Dammit. The 'this' in "this magnet" would be a definite article though I'm assuming?
No. It's a determiner, a pronoun in that case. "The" is the definite article in English.

(Original post by lerjj)
What part of speech is 'dammit', by the way?
An intensifier: a portmanteau word, in this case, formed from a verb ("damn") and a pronoun ("it).
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_Fergo
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(Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
There is a red car.

Please inform me what is what in the sentence above. Is RED the adjective and CAR the noun?

So what's a verb?
Are you actually serious :rolleyes:?

There = adverb of place

Is = verb

Red = complement to the "car" (obviously an adjective).

Car = subject (noun)
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Man.bear.pig
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(Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
There is a red car.

Please inform me what is what in the sentence above. Is RED the adjective and CAR the noun?

So what's a verb?
Yes and yes.
But I thought "is" is an adverb :erm:


lmao at me rethinking it, which means Idk myself....
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Man.bear.pig)
But I thought "is" is an adverb :erm:
The verb "to be", third person singular: I am; you are; he/she/it is; we are; you are; they are.
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Man.bear.pig
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(Original post by Good bloke)
The verb "to be", third person singular: I am; you are; he/she/it is; we are; you are; they are.
Ahhh. Like conjugating "ser" in Spanish and "être" in French?
That's why I love learning new languages, especially English and latin cognates, because you just reintroduce yourself to basic grammar rules that native English speakers normally don't even pay attention to.

I coulda googled that but cheers anyway :yy:
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username1551801
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(Original post by *Stefan*)
Are you actually serious :rolleyes:?

There = adverb of place

Is = verb

Red = complement to the "car" (obviously an adjective).

Car = subject (noun)
Are you actually serious :rolleyes:?
No, the use of 'there' in that sentence is a pronoun, not an adverb.
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_Fergo
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(Original post by Jared44)
Are you actually serious :rolleyes:?
No, the use of 'there' in that sentence is a pronoun, not an adverb.
That is not a set-down rule.

"There" in this case is indeed an existential pronoun, but it acts as an adverb by modifying the verb "to be".

Perhaps less sarcasm can be useful when one isn't sure huh? :P
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Jared44)
Are you actually serious :rolleyes:?
No, the use of 'there' in that sentence is a pronoun, not an adverb.
Well, no. It is an adverb, and is used to replace the adverbial phrase "in/at that place".

Had the sentence been, for instance, "There is a car on that road", then "there" would have been a pronoun.
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