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    hey im abit confused whether you have to put as grades in your ucas or not? Some people do it while some people dont, and only put prediction grades? :confused:
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    I put the AS grade I got in English Language because I wasn't carrying it onto A2.. thats what the teacher advised me to do anyway - even though my other grades were:

    1. Higher than English
    2. Higher than my predicted grades

    Still, got 5/6 offers so I don't think it matters much.
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    (Original post by James_W)
    I put the AS grade I got in English Language because I wasn't carrying it onto A2.. thats what the teacher advised me to do anyway - even though my other grades were:

    1. Higher than English
    2. Higher than my predicted grades

    Still, got 5/6 offers so I don't think it matters much.
    right so i dont think ill bother putting it in
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    I'd only put your AS grade down if you're happy with it, not taking any retakes of that subject, and not carrying it on.
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    It's up to you really isn't it... I really don't think it makes any difference whatsoever because your teacher will probably mention your mark in their reference anyway. Literally, every person in my Sixth Form didn't put their grades and everyone has come through the process very happy, so it's not the b-all and end-all. Although, one of my mates mentioned his straight A's at AS Level within his personal statement and got rejected by Cambridge and Nottingham for Economics.. although that might not be the reason, it just seems to be singing his own praises a bit too much so I would advise against that.
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    I'd only put your AS grade down if you're happy with it, not taking any retakes of that subject, and not carrying it on.
    I put my English down as 'C' in my UCAS form... then e-mailed by universities when it was raised, and they simply updated their records. In some cases, it gave me an excuse to get into contact with my universities to make sure that they had my application without sounding too needy.
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    How did that work? Surely by the time your grade improved, all unis had made offers anyway?
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    Nah.. I got my grade improved in March - and was still waiting for a University to get back to me.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    hey im abit confused whether you have to put as grades in your ucas or not? Some people do it while some people dont, and only put prediction grades? :confused:
    Strictly speaking...i think you have to state all exams taken and all exams you are planning to take....the only exception to that i can think of is if you've rejected a grade from an exam you've taken....

    Having said that....many people don't put everything down on their UCAS form...so i'm unsure...you might wanna try asking Pencil Queen....she's the font of all university knowledge!

    G
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    Strictly speaking...i think you have to state all exams taken and all exams you are planning to take....the only exception to that i can think of is if you've rejected a grade from an exam you've taken....
    hardly anyone in the 6th form put the grades in, because theyre better off retaking it and get 3as prediction grade or something
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    hey im abit confused whether you have to put as grades in your ucas or not? Some people do it while some people dont, and only put prediction grades? :confused:
    You must declare them if you cashed them in.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    You must declare them if you cashed them in.
    Can you explain 'cashing in' for me please, I don't really understand
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    I can't see they will do you any harm as long as they aren't well below your A2 predictions.
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    i put my AS results down when i did my form in september, but then i wasn't retaking any modules. i don't know what you do if you are retaking.
    i would have said that definite results rather than predicted grades were a better measure of how likely you are to get the final grade, but dont know if unis see it like that.
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    I put all my AS grades on my UCAS form. My teachers did my predicted grades accordingly and I got 6 interviews and then 4 offers.

    I don't think it matters. It seems to work both ways - though I did read on the Oxford site that they like to see your AS grades on the form as they're a good indication of your progression from GCSEs.

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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Can you explain 'cashing in' for me please, I don't really understand
    If you cash an AS-level in, then that means that you are happy with the grade that you got at AS-level and you want your AS-level to be an official qualification. You get a certificate. Note that it is the overall grade concerned and not individual modules. You cannot improve on this AS-level grade. You can however, retake AS-level modules in order to improve on the overall A-level. School policies differ, so one school may opt to cash-in AS-levels, whilst another may not. Note that cashing-in costs money. Cashing-in also requires a UCAS applicant to declare the qualification. It is for this reason that most schools have a no-cashing-in policy to allow candidates to improve upon AS-level marks and to save money.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    If you cash an AS-level in, then that means that you are happy with the grade that you got at AS-level and you want your AS-level to be an official qualification. You get a certificate. Note that it is the overall grade concerned and not individual modules. You cannot improve on this AS-level grade. You can however, retake AS-level modules in order to improve on the overall A-level. School policies differ, so one school may opt to cash-in AS-levels, whilst another may not. Note that cashing-in costs money. Cashing-in also requires a UCAS applicant to declare the qualification. It is for this reason that most schools have a no-cashing-in policy to allow candidates to improve upon AS-level marks and to save money.
    Ah ok. Thanks very much for your help
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    You only need to enter the full A-level grades onto the application. You still put your AS grades so you can get a conditional offer and stuff. Enter the AS level grades if you are not continuing that subject at A2.
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    (Original post by trev1122)
    You only need to enter the full A-level grades onto the application. You still put your AS grades so you can get a conditional offer and stuff. Enter the AS level grades if you are not continuing that subject at A2.
    im continuing all my as to a-level
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    I would still put them down if you are happy with them (ie, AAAA or thereabouts) as it backs up your predicted A2s and proves that your predictions aren't made by deluded teachers.
 
 
 
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