zaphod159
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I graduated from Biomedical Science with just barely a 2.1 last year, I am currently a MSc student in cancer, due to some personal issues I had problems with my lessons and lab work, I was even unable to attend the lectures and lab for over a month. As you can imagine this has set me back quiet a bit and although I was aiming for a merit I am pretty sure I am going to end up with just a pass.

This brings me on to my question, is it worth it to do an MRes after my MSc in the same field ? I am sure that the extra 12 months of lab experience from an MRes would make me much more prepared for a PhD, given that I also did not have a lab based project in my undergrad.I am curious if this would effect my PhD applications in a positive or negative way.

Any comment/advice is much appreciated.
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Klix88
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I would ask the staff where you are - they will be the experts. But my feeling is that you're more likely to be asked why you've done two Masters courses. You've potentially under-performed in an MSc, so ask staff whether an additional MRes is really going to compensate for that. And whether they think you actually gave a chance of being accepted onto an MRes and then performing better.

Although I think in your shoes, I'd be more concerned to ask staff whether I would ever have a realistic shot at a PhD. And if it seems unlikely at present, what (if anything) I could do to boost my chances. Perhaps make it an open question and see what ideas they come up with, rather than immediately jumping in with the suggestion of an MRes.
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zaphod159
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I have only under-performed in my lectures. My dissertation result is formed of a presentation + research proposal + report. Out of the three I have completed my proposal and got 72%. So there is still a good chance that I might get a merit in my lab work results, just not in my lectures. People at my university gave me the impression that as a phd is research based, the results of my lab project in my msc would be much more influential on my applications for a phd. I was also told by the same people that the fact that I had not done a lab based project in my undergrad is affecting my application in a bad way. If lab experience is what matters, how can another 12 months in a lab be negative for my application?
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Klix88
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(Original post by zaphod159)
If lab experience is what matters, how can another 12 months in a lab be negative for my application?
That's really a specialist question, specific to your field. You need to ask the staff where you are.

Whilst a PhD in your field is lab-based, you will still need a raft of research and analytical skills to make sense of your lab results. You will also need the skills to present your findings and defend them in front of a viva panel. There may be an argument that if you haven't taken those from an MSc, then would you fare much better with an MRes? But we probably can't aswer that. It's really a lot to do with your personal skillset, situation, experience and aspirations.

You should also be aware that some unis charge a premium for a second Masters. Depending on your target uni's policy, you could find yourself being asked to pay fees which are much larger than those advertised. My department charges International fees for a second Masters, even for Home/EU students. I'd advise checking that where you are, if money might be an issue.
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Baron of Sealand
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I don't know about your field, but many in mine have two master's degrees.
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Klix88
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(Original post by Little Toy Gun)
I don't know about your field, but many in mine have two master's degrees.
Very rare in my field, due to the cost. Also, it wouldn't confer much advantage. I did know someone doing a second Masters, but he was a retired gent and independently wealthy, who just did another Masters occasionally when he got bored
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zaphod159
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Thank you for the replies, I think I really need to contact some unis and people at my university about this to get the correct view for my specific area of subject. In the mean time, if there is anyone from a related biology field, please do contact me or post here. Thanks.
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beautifulbigmacs
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If you feel there's something to be gained from doing more than one masters there's nothing wrong with that.

Although MSc and MRes are both level seven qualifications, an MRes is an opportunity to get experience of and be able to demonstrate different skills that are good preparation for a PhD. That's not to say that a MSc is not a suitable step towards PhD though because it certainly is. Your 2.1 grade at undergraduate also holds PhD weight (I have seen loads of funded PhD opportunities in your subject area).

I'd apply for a range of both MRes and PhD and see how you get on
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alleycat393
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If I were you I'd be more tempted to look for a research assistant job to gain the research experience.
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