How to migrate & qualify as a solicitor in Australia with UK Law degree? HELP!

Watch
NotYourMom
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I am graduating this October with LLB Law degree at a UK university. I want to know how long will it take to qualify as a solicitor in in Australia? And also the procedure to live and work in NSW?

I did my research, first I need my UK LLB Law degree to be assessed by the NSW law society then I guess I have to do certain exams. Finally I need to do PLT/PLC. Also I found out that I need to at least be living in Australia for 2 years in order to apply for work permit visa and later to immigrate to Sydney.

This is where I am confused because the overall duration of doing the exams and PLT would take 1.5 years, which means I won't meet the required points needed in order to apply to immigrate there.

Is there anyone here who can help me from your experience please? What I should be doing in order to successfully qualify as a solicitor and work in a major city law firm in Sydney?
0
reply
NotYourMom
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#2
I thought about qualifying in England & Wales before even mitigating to Australia but my situation is that the law firms here in England won't give me a training contract due to bad grades in my first year. However, I got 1st for my second year and now i'm on my final semester.

Also I am an international student therefore that also puts me at a disadvantage. After speaking to some partners from magic circle firms who were kind enough to tell me the real truth that their recruitment team looks for students from Oxbridge or top 5 law schools even though all top law firms here portrait as if they hire from different universities, not only academic grades matters etc. All the partners advised me not to even go for paralegal role since it doesn't meet the requirement for home office to issue a work visa nor do the LPC in England because I will be wasting my money in the end. Some immigration solicitors confirmed that paralegal role doesn't meet the visa requirement for someone outside Europe like myself.

Therefore they asked me to find a way to move to Canada or Australia, most suggested to go to Australia and slowly build your way up. That is why I am here to find someone who knows about the pathway to legal profession in NSW, Australia?



(Original post by J-SP)
As I understand it, your best chance is to qualify in England and Wales and then move. You are more likely to meet the work visa requirements at that point.

Sydney is a very competitive legal job market. Finding a job at entry level, let alone one that will sponsor you, will be difficult.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
whenthecatcalls
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by NotYourMom)
I thought about qualifying in England & Wales before even mitigating to Australia but my situation is that the law firms here in England won't give me a training contract due to bad grades in my first year. However, I got 1st for my second year and now i'm on my final semester.

Also I am an international student therefore that also puts me at a disadvantage. After speaking to some partners from magic circle firms who were kind enough to tell me the real truth that their recruitment team looks for students from Oxbridge or top 5 law schools even though all top law firms here portrait as if they hire from different universities, not only academic grades matters etc. All the partners advised me not to even go for paralegal role since it doesn't meet the requirement for home office to issue a work visa nor do the LPC in England because I will be wasting my money in the end. Some immigration solicitors confirmed that paralegal role doesn't meet the visa requirement for someone outside Europe like myself.

Therefore they asked me to find a way to move to Canada or Australia, most suggested to go to Australia and slowly build your way up. That is why I am here to find someone who knows about the pathway to legal profession in NSW, Australia?
Sorry I cannot really help as I do not know myself but I was wondering what these top five law firms were?. Thanks
0
reply
cambio wechsel
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by NotYourMom)
find a way to move to Canada or Australia
you might be better served in looking into New Zealand, which is cheaper (to live and to study) and presently has a more relaxed attitude to immigration. Reciprocal arrangements exist between NZ and Oz and having lived in New Zealand for the period of time required to qualify might be of formal help if you then seek to move on to Australia.
0
reply
NotYourMom
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
Thank you for your reply. Having been studying in UK for 5 years in total(A Levels + Uni), I didn't easily give up on UK, I tried everything and I have to face the reality now since the immigration laws has changed sufficiently from the time I first came to UK. I understand Australian Law firms especially which are in cities won't be much different to UK firms when it comes to recruiting process but I am talking about the immigration policy as well.

Following the advice I received from the partners of MC firms, I contacted 4 different well experienced immigration solicitors. They said if I was in a different field for example, business or medicine then there are some options available for someone like myself outside of EU but as of now, the current UK government had made it impossible for my situation.

They all surprisingly suggested Australia than Canada mainly because like one of the users above mentioned Australia's legal system has some similarity to UK's pathway into legal profession, also their immigration laws are far more welcoming and relaxed to UK's immigration laws. For example, I can't apply for work permit if I am going to do paralegal job here, but in Australia I can upon qualifying a lawyer there of course. This is why I am here, trying to find if there is anyone who has qualified as a lawyer in Australia successfully and is working for a law firm? I want to know which route did they take and their experience?


(Original post by J-SP)
You think that Australian firms will be any different to the UK firm regards grades and sponsoring a work permit? I highly doubt they will be much different.

I haven't had direct responsibility for recruiting for Australian firms/offices, but have worked with those that do. Their processes/attitudes are not that different to how English firms/offices work. If you think the UK work permit process is tough, then Australia and in particular Sydney will be much tougher.

The advice you have been given about the English law firms is on point in places but completely awful in others. I wouldn't personally give up on the UK route just because of the opinion of 1-2 misinformed MC partners.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
chalks
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
I am a lawyer who has recently returned to the UK after 10 years in Australia.

I, like all of my English expat lawyer friends in Sydney, migrated as a qualified (and experienced) English solicitor.

You might be able to get a study visa which would enable you to move to Australia for a limited time to study the exams you need to qualify in Australia.

That, however, is only the first stage. Once you'd finished your studies, and got the relevant qualifications to enable you to apply to be admitted in NSW, you'd still to (a) find a job and (b) go through the lengthy process to immigrate as a skilled migrant.

Taking (a) first, the job market in Australia for legal roles is incredibly tight. The quality of graduates is phenomenally high and your chances of securing a role are very slim. As for (b), the skilled migrant process can take a seriously long time and one cannot necessarily remain in country while that process is going on.

The old sponsored migrant process, which many of us used whilst re qualifying, is not (I believe) still available.

Essentially, Australia is a seriously difficult country to move to. Their rules on immigration are surprisingly tight for a country with a low population and vast amounts of space.

If you're still interested, I'd recommend you spend some money instructing an Australian immigration firm familiar with the legal industry.


Posted from TSR Mobile
3
reply
Livvy2005
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
hey im just wondering what you did afterwards, im a student in my 3rd year looking to move to Australia and become a solicitor there, and I do not know whether to do my LPC and Masters here first before I go ?
0
reply
bronse
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Livvy2005)
hey im just wondering what you did afterwards, im a student in my 3rd year looking to move to Australia and become a solicitor there, and I do not know whether to do my LPC and Masters here first before I go ?
In short, it is a lot harder than people think. I agree with the post above you that the market is incredibly tight and particularly law is becoming a very saturated profession.

I moved there to do my Masters a year after finishing my LLB not having the intention of staying, I just wanted to study a Masters in a foreign country. I ended up loving it and started to move down the path of trying to qualify. However, you have to do a minimum of 3 Australian law subjects due to their federal system being different to England. To do this you need a student visa which only 1 or 2 universities in Australia will grant you for only studying single subjects. So problem 1, visa. These subjects are also around AUD 3000-5000 each depending on the university. And problem 2, cost.

If you have an Australian passport you do not have to worry about problem 1 or problem 2 (as much) because you are a citizen and have citizen study prices.

Then there is the problem of actually finding a law firm to take you on - none will sponsor you with a visa. Additionally many won't take you on without you having secured permanent residency (PR) which is notoriously hard to get unless you have sponsorship. So that is problem 3.

This is a very brief overview but if you have any other questions just hit me up.
0
reply
Livvy2005
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
Ok thank you so much, I think ill stay and do everything here first then move, it's just so frustrating because im not particular fond of staying in the UK for another 3-5 years. I am actually heading out to OZ next month for a few weeks, so hopefully I can find even more information. Thanks again I really appreciated your reply
(Original post by bronse)
In short, it is a lot harder than people think. I agree with the post above you that the market is incredibly tight and particularly law is becoming a very saturated profession.

I moved there to do my Masters a year after finishing my LLB not having the intention of staying, I just wanted to study a Masters in a foreign country. I ended up loving it and started to move down the path of trying to qualify. However, you have to do a minimum of 3 Australian law subjects due to their federal system being different to England. To do this you need a student visa which only 1 or 2 universities in Australia will grant you for only studying single subjects. So problem 1, visa. These subjects are also around AUD 3000-5000 each depending on the university. And problem 2, cost.

If you have an Australian passport you do not have to worry about problem 1 or problem 2 (as much) because you are a citizen and have citizen study prices.

Then there is the problem of actually finding a law firm to take you on - none will sponsor you with a visa. Additionally many won't take you on without you having secured permanent residency (PR) which is notoriously hard to get unless you have sponsorship. So that is problem 3.

This is a very brief overview but if you have any other questions just hit me up.
0
reply
eemmmaa
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
Has anyone applied to the legal admissions board in Australia? Does anyone know how many units you would have to do in Australia to transfer your UK LLB to the Australian standard?
0
reply
bronse
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
I applied to NSW and VIC. The minimum requirement is 3. However, unless you have done particular modules in the UK then this is more likely to show up as 4 or 5. I had to do 5 and I know someone else who had to do 4.I'd recommend applying to QLD or VIC. Their application is cheaper (QLD is the cheapest) and can be done online. Plus once you qualify in one state you are eligible in all states for qualification.
0
reply
eemmmaa
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
Thank you so much for your response.

I have a UK LLB and want to apply to VIC, do you think I will have to only do roughly 3, 4 or 5 units to transfer my degree?

(Original post by bronse)
I applied to NSW and VIC. The minimum requirement is 3. However, unless you have done particular modules in the UK then this is more likely to show up as 4 or 5. I had to do 5 and I know someone else who had to do 4.I'd recommend applying to QLD or VIC. Their application is cheaper (QLD is the cheapest) and can be done online. Plus once you qualify in one state you are eligible in all states for qualification.
0
reply
bronse
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by eemmmaa)
Thank you so much for your response.

I have a UK LLB and want to apply to VIC, do you think I will have to only do roughly 3, 4 or 5 units to transfer my degree?
No worries!

I'd be surprised if you had to do more than five. Just take into consideration that the visa system here is a ***** and before you spend money and apply make sure whatever visa you'll be applying for allows you to study (that was one of the pain points for me). If you're an Aussie resident then go for it.
0
reply
eemmmaa
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by bronse)
No worries!

I'd be surprised if you had to do more than five. Just take into consideration that the visa system here is a ***** and before you spend money and apply make sure whatever visa you'll be applying for allows you to study (that was one of the pain points for me). If you're an Aussie resident then go for it.
Oh that's great! I thought I would have to do 7 or 8

How did you get around the visa problem?
0
reply
bronse
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
Well the visa problem was the part that deterred me from starting it - note that I looked very very closely into this and enquired with universities all around Aus but decided to not pursue it and I'm returning to the UK sometime in the near future to qualify. You can study for a period of four months on a working holiday visa (which almost definitely will not be enough time to complete the required units) OR you can get a student visa if you are enrolled in CRICOS recognised course and have been provided with a certificate of enrolment by the university. Generally if you are studying single unit subjects like the ones required to be eligible to qualify then most universities will not issue you with a certificate of enrolment. Some however will - off the top of my head Monash is one of them but their single study units are somewhere around $4000 - $5000 each. Also on a student visa you can only work a maximum of 40 hours per fortnight which is another consideration for living costs etc.

In summary they make it incredibly tough. If money is not so much of a barrier then going via Monash would be your best bet I reckon.
0
reply
Brendan0686
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
I'm wondering if any of you can give me advice on moving to Australia after my LLB? I was born in Australia so fortunately I do not have to worry about tuition fees as they have a great student loan system and I don't have to worry about work permits (THANKFULLY!). I know Australia don't offer maintenance loans but the living costs aren't anything a gap year + family contributions wouldn't take care of.

Anyways, I would like to qualify in Perth (WA) and I am struggling to gather the information needed. Would I just attend a University that would allow me to do 3 subjects, then complete the PLT?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Had lockdown impacted your relationships?

Yes, my partner and I are struggling (21)
7.37%
Yes, my partner and I broke up (22)
7.72%
Yes, it's hard being around my family so much (59)
20.7%
Yes, I'm feeling lonely isolating alone (34)
11.93%
No, nothing has changed (89)
31.23%
No, it's helped improve my relationships (60)
21.05%

Watched Threads

View All