Turn on thread page Beta

WJEC Film Studies A2 11840001 - 12th June 2015 [Revision/Discussion Thread] watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't seen a film studies thread around here for the A2 exam on Friday so I thought it would be helpful to start one.

    What question is everyone doing for each section?
    Are people doing documentary and spectatorship question?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing the documentary and Vertigo general critical debates question along with Urban stories. Does anyone have any good essays I can have a look at?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Marshall)
    I'm doing the documentary and Vertigo general critical debates question along with Urban stories. Does anyone have any good essays I can have a look at?
    there aren't many film studies exemplar online which is annoying but it all depends on what you've been taught!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Guymd)
    there aren't many film studies exemplar online which is annoying but it all depends on what you've been taught!
    Yep, Edexcel are good that they show their model answers and show what is directly needed.

    So what have you learnt for La Haine and City of God? How do you plan your essays?

    And most of the film exam threads seem to have disappered - there's not many of us now!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Marshall)
    Yep, Edexcel are good that they show their model answers and show what is directly needed.

    So what have you learnt for La Haine and City of God? How do you plan your essays?

    And most of the film exam threads seem to have disappered - there's not many of us now!
    I'm doing urban stories (City of God, La Haine) for section A, emotional response and spectatorship (A Clockwork Orange, American History X, Drive) for section B, and Fight Club for section C.

    What about you?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by suzanamarieXD)
    I'm doing urban stories (City of God, La Haine) for section A, emotional response and spectatorship (A Clockwork Orange, American History X, Drive) for section B, and Fight Club for section C.

    What about you?
    Urban Stories.
    Documenatary (Senna, CTF, and the Imposter)
    And Veritgo.

    Rather than let this thread die, let me ask you a few questions:

    How would you anaylse the scene in La Haine when it comes to the playground park?

    What key scenes are vital for answering the La Haine and City of God scenes? I like to use the Opening Scene, the City of God 360* shot, the apartment scene.

    Do you know any good websites for film studies revision?

    I am writing essays and will be posting on them here sooner or later.

    How would you plan essays in timed conditions and what do you to make sure you have done it?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Marshall)
    Urban Stories.
    Documenatary (Senna, CTF, and the Imposter)
    And Veritgo.

    Rather than let this thread die, let me ask you a few questions:

    How would you anaylse the scene in La Haine when it comes to the playground park?

    What key scenes are vital for answering the La Haine and City of God scenes? I like to use the Opening Scene, the City of God 360* shot, the apartment scene.

    Do you know any good websites for film studies revision?

    I am writing essays and will be posting on them here sooner or later.

    How would you plan essays in timed conditions and what do you to make sure you have done it?
    I dont do la haine in film but i do it in french so i dont know how relevant it is but here you goso the 3 boys react negatively to the reporters because they assume they were part of the riot hence their very aggressive reaction. The fact that they stay in their vans suggests that they're scared and worried about the danger the boys might bring them if they get closer to them, this is reinforced by the low angle shot of the reporters to the boys and the high angle shot from the boys etc (if i remember correctly, we dont do textual analysis).the whole scene as a whole shows how feared and marginalised the boys are from society as they're assumed to be animalistic and dangerous even though they were just standing around doing nothing.but their reaction towards the reporters could be seen as the reason why they're feared as they immediatly got offended and started throwing stones at them, shows the aggressiveness of the boys in the hood a key scene to answer la haine question is the art gallery scene that is all i know, very basic knowledge from french
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by suzanamarieXD)
    I'm doing urban stories (City of God, La Haine) for section A, emotional response and spectatorship (A Clockwork Orange, American History X, Drive) for section B, and Fight Club for section C.

    What about you?
    For Section C-Fight Club are you relying on the fact that the general questions will come up and answer either critical approach or critical review?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dmowle)
    For Section C-Fight Club are you relying on the fact that the general questions will come up and answer either critical approach or critical review?
    Yeah I'm hoping for critical approach and going mental with gender and Freud hahah they've been my best essays so far. I'm at the cramming stage now, moving onto section B and hopefully section C tonight and tomorrow! You?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Is anyone doing grizzly man or/and The Imposter for documentary and spectatorship?
    Its the only section i find really challenging
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing Japanese Cinema, Popular and Emotional Response and Fight Club. If anyone needs any help just ask.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    A shame that the days went so fast! Wish everybody good luck!

    Well here are some of my essays:


    Explain how far the application of a critical approach has either reinforced or challenged your first impression of your close study film?

    Vertigo is a film that benefits from repeat viewing. Upon first viewing, Vertigo(1958, dir Alfred Hitchcock) may appear to be a failed thriller film, however on second viewing, the film is about a detective’s quest to save a young woman. Hitchcock’s film intertwines an intense obsession of fear, and Scottie’s descent into madness. The film has challenged my first impression on so many layers. A number of critical approaches have completely expanded my first initial impressions, and I have found the nosographic and Mulvey’s debate to be interesting.

    One of the most significant critical approaches that has challenged my perception of Vertigo is the film is often cited as a film about filmmaking, and thus the relationship it bears between the spectator and cinema. The nosographic approach applies many of Hitchcock’s personality traits or auteurist neurosis and can be evaluated and identified with Vertigo. Arguably Hitchcock suggests to the audience the innate relationship between cinema and spectator. The stairs sequence builds suspense as a mid shot of Scottie’s failure to ascend the stairs highlights his failure as a male character or the flawed protagonist. As Robin Wood describes, the ‘dangling man’. Hitchcock leaves Scottie suspended like this teetering on the verge of self destruction. The fact that Scottie’s failure to ascend the stairs represent Hitchcock’s insecurities, thus presenting to the audience the relationship between the spectator and cinema, just as we suspend our disbelief in order to find pleasure in cinema. Scottie does exactly this, but his fear of acrophobia confines his masculine side, and portrays his feminine side. As soon as Scottie witnesses the collapse of the star of his dream, then he begins to descend into falseness and madness, thus mirroring our own experience within cinema.

    A further insight that has challenged my initial impression and has allowed me to gain nto Hitchcock’s work is through how the motifs interrelate to each of the film’s themes of power and authority, and how it signifies Hitchcock’s power as a director. For example, the obvious motif is the spiral, evident in Madeline’s hair, the stairs, the tailoring of Madeline by Scottie through the streets of San Francisco. The opening scene where Saul’s Baus geographical vortex’s spirals out portrays a sense of dizziness and spiralling. The image of the falling man combined with a dark non-diegetic music score combined with the graphic image of the falling man connotes there is danger, and Hitchcock is the master of his own world. This alludes to the idea that Hitchcock is suggesting to the audience that he is the master illusioner, he has created this illusion to entrap the audience into his own story. In the same way Elster is a representation of Hitchcock himself. Elster is the director’s plaything that is used to diverge Scottie into the fabricated fantasy. Furthermore, depictions in Elster’s office illustrate paintings of ships going into troubled water; this is also considerable because Elster belongs in the shipbuilding industry. However one can argue that Hitchcock is the master architect that is designing the ‘ship’ for Scottie to sail into trouble waters. Though Elster, who acts as a puppet, is the captain of this very ship that is created for Scottie specifically. Therefore this shows that Hitchcock is the master of spiral motifs within Vertigo and the signfiance of Gavin Elster can be obtained from approaching the film in a nosographic way.


    Another significant debate which I found interesting, and challenged my first initial impression to the film was Mulvey’s theory of the objectification of women. An example of how Hitchcock purposefully implements this is by putting the male gaze into the film through Scottie. The very significance of voyeurism. Hitchcock displays this through a tight frame shot when Scottie focuses on Madeline in the flower boutique shop. This could be argued as Mulvey identifies the ‘male gaze’. Madeline is the object of desire simply because she is beautiful. However when one considers Mulvey’s argument that the zoom in camera fragmentation of the female form, therefore the spectator will take a different view of they see Scottie’s character and his morals. For example, during the sequence of tailoring Madeline, Hitchcock uses shot-reverse shot including when Scottie observes Madeline. The camera forces the spectator to become aligned with Scottie as he tailors Madeleine. This could be also be described as Mulvey arguing that this represents Scottie’s failures, his masculine side is weakened as he pursues Madeline, thus becoming more feminine, and an object of beauty as she argues, is more desirable to the male gaze. Indeed this ties in with the nosographic approach that because Hitchcock viewed Madeliene as the ‘innocent blonde’, they were pure and innocent. In terms of Scottie, Madeleine represents the young ‘innocent woman’ that is the pursuit of his ambitions. He has to get that Madeliene no matter what when he begins to delude himself and lose all sense of reality.


    A further critical approach that is signficnant is Maxfield’s suggestion of a dream within a dream which challenged my first initital impression of Vertigo. For example, Hitchcock portrays Scottie experincing his nightmare through a loose frame shot, displaying the madness that Scottie has descended himself into. The bright virbant graphic colours of the flowers, yellow for Midge, and green/red for Madeline disintregrates in front of his eyes. The flowers and spirals spin around combined with dark non-diagetic music. Another example can be taken when Hitchcock presents Scottie dangling from a extreme close up shot, thus emphasising claustrophobia and Scottie’s fear of acrophobia. One could examine this as Scottie trying to alter the fate of his dream. Arguably, Hitchcock is the master of illusion, and through Elster, has created an imposing punishment on Scottie for being deluded. The obsession and fear that envelopes Scottie is an development of his failures as a man. Maxfield argues that Scottie becomes ‘weak’ and dangling and therefore he cannot restore his sanity. He has become too deluded in a fabricated plot. Another example can be taken when Hitchcock presents a close up of Scottie talioring Madeline through the streets, creating an feeling of a dream. Maxfield also argues that Scottie alters the fate of his dream to specifically avoid what Hitchcock or Elster has intended for him. However, one could also intrepret this as a way of Scottie’s descent into madness and losing all sense of reality, which thus mirrors our own experince as we suspend our disbelief in order to experince the entertmaintment of cinema.

    By applying a number of critical approaches, more specifically Laura Mulvey’s debate, Maxfield’s suggestion of a dream within a dream in Veritgo has developed my first initial impression and has challenged my view that it is a failed thriller to the deeply psychological layers that the film contains which are hidden meanings that are laced, something that neither the audience nor the spectator will know at first glance on their first viewing;. Through these various debates, I have anaylsed the viewpoints, examined the various viewpoints, and has thus broadened the film in my insight with central issues such as the relationship between the spectator and cinema, the power of the director’s illusion, the objectification of women, and Maxfield’s a dream within a dream. These have all helped me gain a fresh insight into Vertigo.








    Point- What is the critical approach?Evidence - Apply the critical approach to specifc moments in the film
    Explain - Discuss the critical approach and how it has provided you with a fresh insight into the film.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    The ‘complexity of spectator response suggests that documentary offers much more than a window on some aspect of our world’. Discuss this statement with reference to the films you have studied for this topic?

    Documentary films are in theory, non fiction films that are based on true cases. A common misconception is that they are entirely factual/unbiased and offer only a ‘window on some aspect of our world’. This is not usually the case since the documentary is made from the viewpoint of the director, and thus they gradually present an unfolding narrative that covers different opinions and viewpoints, suggesting that the complexity of the spectator response depends upon the fact that the documentary offers more to the spectator. The spectator will therefore view the documentary in a different manner. Both Senna(2010, Asif Kapadia) and Capturing the Friedmans (2003, Andrew Jarecki) can be said to manipulate their audiences and suggest that documentary offers much more than a window aspect as they are based on real life events.

    One way in which documentaries offer more than just an aspect of our world is by questioning the nature of truth, as Jarecki does this by employing the participatory mode during the leapfrog scene. Jarecki presents a close up of the computer student, being loosely framed in order to give the aura of distrust towards the audience, claiming that there was rape. Jarecki then juxtaposes his argument by showing another former student claiming that nothing like this ever happened. The illusion created by the cross cutting has been edited by Jarecki to deliberately give the conception of giving a balanced viewpoint. Jarecki’s constant use of cross cutting combined with editing forces the spectator to question the nature of truth and to perceive that documentary offers much more than just a ‘window aspect’, which is different to fiction films in this regard. Although constructed by Jarecki, the use of the participatory mode is used to manipulate the audience, thus forcing them to make different requirements to question the nature of truth. This ties in with Koenig’s argument that every ‘shot is a lie’ and that no ‘two shots are the same’. This encourages the director to explore the complexity of the spectator’s response as each spectator will have different viewpoints of how they see a documentary. In this regard the spectator’s response becomes complex with many differing viewpoints. For me as a spectator, I found my response to be complex as I viewed different viewpoints from both sides. The use of juxtaposing shots used by Jarecki also changed my perception of how cases are normally presented in courts. Jarecki manipulated me into believing that there were two even sided arguments, when in fact the documentary itself had only one argument, and that I had to question the nature of truth. However documentary can never be subjective, for both the audience and the spectator are required to question the nature of truth rather than suspend their disbelief. Therefore Jarecki uses the participatory mode to explore the complexity of the spectator response and offers more than just a window aspect of the world, instead arguing to question the nature of truth.


    Another way in which documentary offers more than just a window aspect of our world, is by Kapadia employing the poetic mode to celebrate the life of Ayrton Senna, to allow the audience to feel what was being felt at the time. This satisfies the notion that documentary offers more than just a narrow viewpoint. Kapadia utilizes footage of Senna’s body being carried away into his helicopter, connoting how this great/lamented man has departed from earth, thus evoking an emotional response from the audience. The graphic shots of Senna arriving in Brazil to be welcomed as an hero acknowledges the sacrifices he made for Brazil to win Formula 1 at a time when Brazil was rife with corruption and ruled by military juntas. Hence, it is akin to that of Jesus Christ’s story. Kapadia combines footage of his early years a racer to his glorious highlight of his career, cutting to interviews very often, this is combined with sad-non diegetic music to create an emotional response from the spectator. The realistic setting created by Kapadia helps to impact on the spectator. If the documentary is offering more as Senna is depicting, than it is clear that documentary cannot be defined through a corner aspect of the world. Although constructed by Kapadia, the use of the poetic mode ties with Renov’s purposes to express what a respected and celebrated man he was, This ties in Flaherty’s argument that it depends on the ‘authenticity of results’. The documentary created by Kapadia has an impact on the audience due to its constructed editing, and thus represents the fact that the documentary is considering different viewpoints from Senna’s celebrated admirers to his worst. In this sense the documentary is far more flexible for it provides an insight to the world of formula one and where Senna lived in, but it is unlike a fiction film that is usually restricted to specific viewpoints. For me as a spectator, I felt emotional at the loss of Ayrton Senna, though it had been deliberately and cleverly constructed by Kapadia to make me feel emotional at this point. I felt as if I knew what the people of Brazil were feeling at the time; a man that was standing against the corrupted politics of formula 1, and who provided hope to Brazil when it was ruled by corruption mostly. This clever use of construction evoked an emotional response while engaging me in the historical context. At this point, Kapadia is exploring the complexity of the spectator’s response through evoking emotional and historical contexts together. Each spectator will differ on how they see his departure on earth has. Some may celebrate while some may say that he was detrimental. In this regard Kapadia’s documentary can be seen as a ‘love letter’ that celebrates his achievements while ignoring pretty important races that he won, instead focusing on the trivial aspects. Therefore he uses Senna to explore the complexity of the spectator’s response and to agree that documentary offers much more than just a ‘window aspect of the world’.

    The complexity of the spectator’s response can be engaged in Capturing the Friedmans, where Jarecki employs the use of the participatory mode to explore the conflict between Seth and Panaro. Jarecki presents a close up of Panaro as the dark, grubby lawyer that pleads with Jessie to admit guilt to reduce his prison sentence. Jarckei juxtaposes this with Seth claiming that all Panaro was after was money, and that he neither cared about the case and was in there for his own advantage. In this sense, Jarecki provides the audience with a edited conception of balance through the construction of the nature of shots. Although constructed by Jarecki the use of the participatory mode and presenting the two sides of the cases brings an interesting mix into so far what Jarecki has presented to the audience. Instantly the case becomes much more complex and demands far more of the spectator to understand how this case had grown too complex. This ties in with Koneig’s argument that no ‘two shots are the same’ and many are ‘telling the lie in order to tell the truth’. In this case, the spectator’s response becomes complex because of the very nature of the case itself. There will be different viewpoints from the spectator and that is the very purpose of any documentary, because unlike an fiction film, it enforces the spectator to engage with the subject as they are real life cases. As a spectator I felt as if Jarecki was manipulating me as the spectator, and the audience at the same time to present a ‘balanced’ viewpoint of the conflict between Seth and Panaro. However I could not bring myself to trust any particular viewpoint since both sides presented a contradictory view which I myself could not figure out. Therefore the demand on me as a spectator to understand the two viewpoints of Seth and Panaro pointing the blame on each other became much more demanding. It would take me some time to review the sides presented. Therefore Jarecki employs the use of the participatory mode to explore the complexity of the spectator response, and to reference the fact that documentary offers much more than just a narrow viewpoint.

    Another issue raised by the complexity of the spectator’s response is generated by Asif Kapadia’s depiction of the Japanese Grand Prix scene through the use of edited and captured footage. This historic documentary uses the observational mode to depict Senna’s highlight and his struggles at the height of his career. Kapadia, unlike Jarecki doesn’t participate due to the construction of captured footage that has been edited. The use of constructed shots is questionable due to his selection of close ups, creating a close relationship between the protagonist and the spectator. This is evident in the sequence, the Japanese Grand Prix where Kapadia selects the in-car race footage, putting the spectator as part of the race. Kapadia uses long shots of Alan Prost, distancing himself from the spectator, and subsequently lands him the job of the anti-protagonist. This ties into the idea of Flaherty’s argument that documentary must always make an impact on the audience, and the idea of portraying Prost as a villain is the deliberate construction of shots. For me as a spectator, I was on the side of Senna, however this scene raises questions on the spectator’s mind whether Prost was actually a villain or not, or if it is just Kapadia’s selection to present his viewpoint. Therefore Kapadia employs the use of the observational mode to explore the complexity of the spectator’s response and to reference the fact that documentary offers much than just a window aspect.

    In conclusion, it is clear that any documentary offers more because it has differing viewpoints of a real life subject. The idea that documentary is accurate is a complete misconception. Unlike a fiction film, in Capturing the Friedmans, the spectator is overburdened with having to view many ludicrous and sensible viewpoints. Each viewpoints believe that their response is the truth, and the spectator is often encouraged to question the nature of truth. And however, in Senna it is more of a celebration of his life, coupled with viewpoints that celebrate rather than negate his story. It is clear that documentary will offer much more from a historical/social context based on a real life subject case, and is very unlikely to offer a narrow aspect of the world.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Marshall)
    A shame that the days went so fast! Wish everybody good luck!

    Well here are some of my essays:


    Explain how far the application of a critical approach has either reinforced or challenged your first impression of your close study film?

    Vertigo is a film that benefits from repeat viewing. Upon first viewing, Vertigo(1958, dir Alfred Hitchcock) may appear to be a failed thriller film, however on second viewing, the film is about a detective’s quest to save a young woman. Hitchcock’s film intertwines an intense obsession of fear, and Scottie’s descent into madness. The film has challenged my first impression on so many layers. A number of critical approaches have completely expanded my first initial impressions, and I have found the nosographic and Mulvey’s debate to be interesting.

    One of the most significant critical approaches that has challenged my perception of Vertigo is the film is often cited as a film about filmmaking, and thus the relationship it bears between the spectator and cinema. The nosographic approach applies many of Hitchcock’s personality traits or auteurist neurosis and can be evaluated and identified with Vertigo. Arguably Hitchcock suggests to the audience the innate relationship between cinema and spectator. The stairs sequence builds suspense as a mid shot of Scottie’s failure to ascend the stairs highlights his failure as a male character or the flawed protagonist. As Robin Wood describes, the ‘dangling man’. Hitchcock leaves Scottie suspended like this teetering on the verge of self destruction. The fact that Scottie’s failure to ascend the stairs represent Hitchcock’s insecurities, thus presenting to the audience the relationship between the spectator and cinema, just as we suspend our disbelief in order to find pleasure in cinema. Scottie does exactly this, but his fear of acrophobia confines his masculine side, and portrays his feminine side. As soon as Scottie witnesses the collapse of the star of his dream, then he begins to descend into falseness and madness, thus mirroring our own experience within cinema.

    A further insight that has challenged my initial impression and has allowed me to gain nto Hitchcock’s work is through how the motifs interrelate to each of the film’s themes of power and authority, and how it signifies Hitchcock’s power as a director. For example, the obvious motif is the spiral, evident in Madeline’s hair, the stairs, the tailoring of Madeline by Scottie through the streets of San Francisco. The opening scene where Saul’s Baus geographical vortex’s spirals out portrays a sense of dizziness and spiralling. The image of the falling man combined with a dark non-diegetic music score combined with the graphic image of the falling man connotes there is danger, and Hitchcock is the master of his own world. This alludes to the idea that Hitchcock is suggesting to the audience that he is the master illusioner, he has created this illusion to entrap the audience into his own story. In the same way Elster is a representation of Hitchcock himself. Elster is the director’s plaything that is used to diverge Scottie into the fabricated fantasy. Furthermore, depictions in Elster’s office illustrate paintings of ships going into troubled water; this is also considerable because Elster belongs in the shipbuilding industry. However one can argue that Hitchcock is the master architect that is designing the ‘ship’ for Scottie to sail into trouble waters. Though Elster, who acts as a puppet, is the captain of this very ship that is created for Scottie specifically. Therefore this shows that Hitchcock is the master of spiral motifs within Vertigo and the signfiance of Gavin Elster can be obtained from approaching the film in a nosographic way.


    Another significant debate which I found interesting, and challenged my first initial impression to the film was Mulvey’s theory of the objectification of women. An example of how Hitchcock purposefully implements this is by putting the male gaze into the film through Scottie. The very significance of voyeurism. Hitchcock displays this through a tight frame shot when Scottie focuses on Madeline in the flower boutique shop. This could be argued as Mulvey identifies the ‘male gaze’. Madeline is the object of desire simply because she is beautiful. However when one considers Mulvey’s argument that the zoom in camera fragmentation of the female form, therefore the spectator will take a different view of they see Scottie’s character and his morals. For example, during the sequence of tailoring Madeline, Hitchcock uses shot-reverse shot including when Scottie observes Madeline. The camera forces the spectator to become aligned with Scottie as he tailors Madeleine. This could be also be described as Mulvey arguing that this represents Scottie’s failures, his masculine side is weakened as he pursues Madeline, thus becoming more feminine, and an object of beauty as she argues, is more desirable to the male gaze. Indeed this ties in with the nosographic approach that because Hitchcock viewed Madeliene as the ‘innocent blonde’, they were pure and innocent. In terms of Scottie, Madeleine represents the young ‘innocent woman’ that is the pursuit of his ambitions. He has to get that Madeliene no matter what when he begins to delude himself and lose all sense of reality.


    A further critical approach that is signficnant is Maxfield’s suggestion of a dream within a dream which challenged my first initital impression of Vertigo. For example, Hitchcock portrays Scottie experincing his nightmare through a loose frame shot, displaying the madness that Scottie has descended himself into. The bright virbant graphic colours of the flowers, yellow for Midge, and green/red for Madeline disintregrates in front of his eyes. The flowers and spirals spin around combined with dark non-diagetic music. Another example can be taken when Hitchcock presents Scottie dangling from a extreme close up shot, thus emphasising claustrophobia and Scottie’s fear of acrophobia. One could examine this as Scottie trying to alter the fate of his dream. Arguably, Hitchcock is the master of illusion, and through Elster, has created an imposing punishment on Scottie for being deluded. The obsession and fear that envelopes Scottie is an development of his failures as a man. Maxfield argues that Scottie becomes ‘weak’ and dangling and therefore he cannot restore his sanity. He has become too deluded in a fabricated plot. Another example can be taken when Hitchcock presents a close up of Scottie talioring Madeline through the streets, creating an feeling of a dream. Maxfield also argues that Scottie alters the fate of his dream to specifically avoid what Hitchcock or Elster has intended for him. However, one could also intrepret this as a way of Scottie’s descent into madness and losing all sense of reality, which thus mirrors our own experince as we suspend our disbelief in order to experince the entertmaintment of cinema.

    By applying a number of critical approaches, more specifically Laura Mulvey’s debate, Maxfield’s suggestion of a dream within a dream in Veritgo has developed my first initial impression and has challenged my view that it is a failed thriller to the deeply psychological layers that the film contains which are hidden meanings that are laced, something that neither the audience nor the spectator will know at first glance on their first viewing;. Through these various debates, I have anaylsed the viewpoints, examined the various viewpoints, and has thus broadened the film in my insight with central issues such as the relationship between the spectator and cinema, the power of the director’s illusion, the objectification of women, and Maxfield’s a dream within a dream. These have all helped me gain a fresh insight into Vertigo.

    Point- What is the critical approach?Evidence - Apply the critical approach to specifc moments in the film
    Explain - Discuss the critical approach and how it has provided you with a fresh insight into the film.
    This looks really good. Do you know your mark? I'm guessing pretty damn high.
    I have never heard of the 'nosographic approach' before and when I google it medical things come up. What actually is it?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BecauseImBatman)
    This looks really good. Do you know your mark? I'm guessing pretty damn high.
    I have never heard of the 'nosographic approach' before and when I google it medical things come up. What actually is it?
    The nosographic approach is where we attempt to psychoanaylse the director. Think of Hitchcock's motiffs - his up bringing, the flawed protaginst, is Scottie the representation of Hitchcock himself?

    His films seen as symptoms, can be used to anaylse for example the director's mother fixation - Hitchcock - upbringing very strict.

    Examples:

    Elster envisoning the time when men had power - a reaction to the late 1950s feminist movement?
    Bookshop - had power.
    Scottie - fabrication plot?

    Not so high - I've been getting Ds! This was looking at a model answer - and writing it in my own words. I don't know really - all I can do is give the best of my ability tomorrow and then finally just get rid of the exam!

    Think of colours - green for ghostly, red for warning and danger, Scottie's fantasy, yellow for Midge.

    Passage - Scottie clinging on top of the roof tower.

    Autuerist neurosis( an attempt to psychoanalyse the director).
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AtomicHalcyon)
    I'm doing Japanese Cinema, Popular and Emotional Response and Fight Club. If anyone needs any help just ask.
    i'm doing japanese cinema!! what films have you studied?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    this is scary. people dont think it but film is hard!! good luck to everyone tomorrow! make sure to let me know how it went
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Guymd)
    this is scary. people dont think it but film is hard!! good luck to everyone tomorrow! make sure to let me know how it went
    Film IS hard, I hate people that say 'it's easy, you just watch films' ;-; I only picked it up last year in AS and I'm bricking it this year, but it should be good!! Good luck to you too
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AtomicHalcyon)
    I'm doing Japanese Cinema, Popular and Emotional Response and Fight Club. If anyone needs any help just ask.
    I'm doing Surrealism, Popular and Emotional Response, and Fight Club Let me know how it goes!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey everyone, the exam seemed pretty nice if im honest, not tooo harsh, that being said I feel like i wrote all my answers too informally, (except surrealism) (I was doing Surrealism, Documentary and Fight Club) Annoying because i can talk about them for days but when it comes to writing it in an exam, I DIED hahaha, now all we do is pray

    How did you all find it??
 
 
 

University open days

  1. University of Edinburgh
    All Departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  2. University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  3. Loughborough University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.