Ggdf
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Hello there

I'm trying to identify the carbonyl groups in the following 4 molecules.
I can easily find the location of the functional carbonyl group in molecules A and C (the top group in both cases), but am unable to locate the group in either B or D. It isn't obvious to me where this group is hiding; it is within the CH2OH group in molecule B, and within the CHO group in molecule D?

I believe there is supposed to be a carbonyl group hidden somewhere in each of these molecules.

Please might anyone be able to point them out to me?

Thank you very much
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username1421435
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Im having trouble locating said molecules
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EdmundWoodstock
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Can you post photos/pictures of the actual molecules so we can help you...?
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charco
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Dem carbonyl groups sure are hidden ...

... so are the molecules.
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Ggdf
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Name:  carbonyl.jpg
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Thank you for your help!
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EdmundWoodstock
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(Original post by Ggdf)
Name:  carbonyl.jpg
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Thank you for your help!
There is no carbonyl group in B and in D it's the group at the top, in turquoise, an aldehyde. Aldehydes, which are always as the end of chains, are written as CHO to distinguish them from COH (alcohol) groups.
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Ggdf
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(Original post by EdmundWoodstock)
There is no carbonyl group in B and in D it's the group at the top, in turquoise, an aldehyde. Terminal carbonyls are written as CHO to distinguish them from COH (alcohol) groups.
Thank you very much, I was unaware that the carbonyl group could be represented in that way. Would I deduce that it is an aldehyde group because of the 'CH' part of the 'CHO'?
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EdmundWoodstock
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(Original post by Ggdf)
Thank you very much, I was unaware that the carbonyl group could be represented in that way. Would I deduce that it is an aldehyde group because of the 'CH' part of the 'CHO'?
Yes, whenever you see a CHO it's always an aldehyde.
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