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    What is the best way of revising when you have very little time left? The usual stuff like making notes from books doesn't seem very time-efficient, so does anyone have any better ideas?
    I'm sure a lot of people, myself included, would find them helpful! :rolleyes:
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    What I've done is photocopied the essential bits of my textbook and highlighted the important things. Read it twice. And I write notes in the margins.

    Other than that.. try hypnopaedia?
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    I also used to find revision books helpful as the cut out the woffle, this is fine for GCSE/AS but for A2 you probably need the more detail. You could ask people questions on here and see if people can answer them.
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    Do questions. Ask someone to test you. Get a microphone and recorder, speak out the important facts and record and listen. Speak out what you read, listen to your recorded tape of information while you rest. Get a paper, cut it into cards and write definitions and write information on them so you can match them up. Highlight what you read. Combine speaking, reading, listening and doing.
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    (Original post by Cate)
    What is the best way of revising when you have very little time left? The usual stuff like making notes from books doesn't seem very time-efficient, so does anyone have any better ideas?
    I'm sure a lot of people, myself included, would find them helpful! :rolleyes:
    Past Paper questions, time yourself to the time you would get in an exam OR do 'exam plans' to save time, where you plan what you would say in each question.
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    (Original post by corey)
    Past Paper questions, time yourself to the time you would get in an exam OR do 'exam plans' to save time, where you plan what you would say in each question.
    Wow, a reply from you that isn't unpleasant
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    Test-your-self questions are probably the best because you can see and then learn the things you don't know.
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    Hmm.. what subjects are you revising for?

    It depends on the nature of your subjects. For science, past papers are good. For the Arts however, especially History, there is less need for doing past papers coz' questions rarely come out twice.
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    Well, if you really haven't done any revision and you really don't think you have enough time to do any proper work then the best way to go about it is not worry until the morning of the exam and just cram everything in then.
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    Hmm.. what subjects are you revising for?

    It depends on the nature of your subjects. For science, past papers are good. For the Arts however, especially History, there is less need for doing past papers coz' questions rarely come out twice.
    English maths and psychology gcses (did the others a year early)
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    Do your maths past papers. Do about 4 of them under timed conditions and you will be more than prepared to get an A. Go through your formulae just before the exam, make sure you are familiar with the syllabus and what you need to remember.

    Psychology. Do the whole framework thing.. like list what you need to know, and check it off. Call up your mates and discuss case studies and basically get the gist of what is necessary.

    Lolz.. I don't know how you can revise for English. I never do.
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    i'm finding revising for my advanced higher history exam which i've got tomorrow a complete *******. I'd usually go out and buy revision guides and work from them but i can't as they don't bloody make any. I'm doing a really obscure module on medieval Japan which about 50 people in total do. The only books i have are designed for uni students and proper scholars who study japanese history and there too big and have too much detail and alot of the time are irrelevant to the course.
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    Do your maths past papers. Do about 4 of them under timed conditions and you will be more than prepared to get an A. Go through your formulae just before the exam, make sure you are familiar with the syllabus and what you need to remember.

    Psychology. Do the whole framework thing.. like list what you need to know, and check it off. Call up your mates and discuss case studies and basically get the gist of what is necessary.

    Lolz.. I don't know how you can revise for English. I never do.
    ok good ideas, merci
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    Do your maths past papers. Do about 4 of them under timed conditions and you will be more than prepared to get an A. Go through your formulae just before the exam, make sure you are familiar with the syllabus and what you need to remember.

    Psychology. Do the whole framework thing.. like list what you need to know, and check it off. Call up your mates and discuss case studies and basically get the gist of what is necessary.

    Lolz.. I don't know how you can revise for English. I never do.
    what i did for maths was meet up with my friends every day for about 5 days before the exam and just work through past papers together. Was really good as at least one of us used to get everything so you'd never be stuck for hours not getting something like u usually do when revising maths. I reckon i got an a (hopefully) cos of that revision technique
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    (Original post by iiikewldude)
    i'm finding revising for my advanced higher history exam which i've got tomorrow a complete *******. I'd usually go out and buy revision guides and work from them but i can't as they don't bloody make any. I'm doing a really obscure module on medieval Japan which about 50 people in total do. The only books i have are designed for uni students and proper scholars who study japanese history and there too big and have too much detail and alot of the time are irrelevant to the course.
    Wow I know some of that stuff from computer games! Shogun: Total War! You could revise and have fun at the same time!
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    try hypnopaedia?
    What's that? *feels thick as nobody else has asked*
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    (Original post by SiAnY)
    What's that? *feels thick as nobody else has asked*
    Revising in one's sleep.
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    I find the specification from the exam board website works wonders as a study aid.
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    (Original post by young_free)
    I find the specification from the exam board website works wonders as a study aid.
    Agreed, especially for science subjects. It also appears to be the ONLY concise version of SQA Advanced Highers available anywhere, there are no revision guides, and only 3 past papers, which you can't even buy.
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    past papers and also read through all of the lectures making notes on the topics (basically copying out the lecture notes in a slightly more condensed form) works well for me.
 
 
 
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