Mathmatician
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Lets say someone is doing a masters degree in maths at a very low ranked university. What are their chances of getting into a place like Oxbridge to do a masters again in the exact same subject?
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IfOnlyItWereEasy
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I don't know about the chances. Probably unlikely though as you will already have 'the exact same' degree. They'd be unlikely to accept someone who performed poorly the first time, and if you did well, then why would you possibly want to redo it? The degree matters more than the university!
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Vanny17
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(Original post by Mathmatician)
Lets say someone is doing a masters degree in maths at a very low ranked university. What are their chances of getting into a place like Oxbridge to do a masters again in the exact same subject?
Why waste money because of University prestige? It would be wasteful (time, money and resources) to do 2 masters in the same subject. Also, masters is only important if you want to go further e.g. University lecturer, researcher etc.

I would advise you to work in your BSc job area if it interests you (I am assuming you are continuing your masters in the same subject as your BSc) then work your way up.

Doing a masters costs money and it requires dedication. Why put your all into your 1st masters then do the same masters again in a different University? It would be beneficial to earn money first to both care for your needs and pay your masters fees before you consider doing a masters degree. I would not advise anyone to do 2 masters. If the subject and University prestige interests you that much, finish the masters at a low rank Uni and pursue a masters at a higher rank University.

NB: I would only recommend someone to do a masters if they want a career change or want to become a University lecturer/ researcher etc.
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Mathmatician
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(Original post by IfOnlyItWereEasy)
I don't know about the chances. Probably unlikely though as you will already have 'the exact same' degree. They'd be unlikely to accept someone who performed poorly the first time, and if you did well, then why would you possibly want to redo it? The degree matters more than the university!
There is loads of reason why people would want to redo, for example better/ more rigorous course.
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Mathmatician
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(Original post by Vanny17)
Why waste money because of University prestige? It would be wasteful (time, money and resources) to do 2 masters in the same subject. Also, masters is only important if you want to go further e.g. University lecturer, researcher etc.

I would advise you to work in your BSc job area if it interests you (I am assuming you are continuing your masters in the same subject as your BSc) then work your way up.

Doing a masters costs money and it requires dedication. Why put your all into your 1st masters then do the same masters again in a different University? It would be beneficial to earn money first to both care for your needs and pay your masters fees before you consider doing a masters degree. I would not advise anyone to do 2 masters. If the subject and University prestige interests you that much, finish the masters at a low rank Uni and pursue a masters at a higher rank University.

NB: I would only recommend someone to do a masters if they want a career change or want to become a University lecturer/ researcher etc.
It's not just because of prestige, the course is amazing
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gutenberg
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(Original post by Mathmatician)
There is loads of reason why people would want to redo, for example better/ more rigorous course.
Ok, but would you want a more rigorous course in order to progress to a PhD for instance? Or just to have Oxbridge on your CV? If it's the former, then why not just apply for Oxbridge in the first instance? If it's the latter, then it's a lot of money to throw away for a piece of paper.
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beautifulbigmacs
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Do as many masters as you like because you enjoy broadening your options/knowledge or love study or whatever.

But to do the same degree again just for (so called) prestige? Nahhh!
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Mathmatician
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(Original post by gutenberg)
Ok, but would you want a more rigorous course in order to progress to a PhD for instance? Or just to have Oxbridge on your CV? If it's the former, then why not just apply for Oxbridge in the first instance? If it's the latter, then it's a lot of money to throw away for a piece of paper.
Yes I would. I enjoy this subjects area and I want to become the best mathmatician possible and that will come by pushing myself very hard.

I have not got the marks to apply straight to Oxbridge.
I personally think I would have very good chances for Oxbridge if I apply after a first masters.
What do you think ?
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gutenberg
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(Original post by Mathmatician)
Yes I would. I enjoy this subjects area and I want to become the best mathmatician possible and that will come by pushing myself very hard.

I have not got the marks to apply straight to Oxbridge.
I personally think I would have very good chances for Oxbridge if I apply after a first masters.
What do you think ?
It would very much depend on how you performed on that first master's. If you have an average Bachelors degree (say a mid 2.1), and then you again perform averagely on the first master's, I would say your chances for Oxbridge would be slim. You would have shown no progression, and that you're resolutely middle-of-the-road academically. Just having a master's doesn't mean you'd be accepted for another one, or mean you'd be accepted for the PhD. Bear in mind that at postgraduate level, some of the best mathematical minds flock to Oxford & Cambridge, so to have a chance (especially if you don't have a stellar undergraduate record), you would really need to ace your first master's course.

Oh, and you would also need to be absolutely loaded...
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Mathmatician
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(Original post by gutenberg)
It would very much depend on how you performed on that first master's. If you have an average Bachelors degree (say a mid 2.1), and then you again perform averagely on the first master's, I would say your chances for Oxbridge would be slim. You would have shown no progression, and that you're resolutely middle-of-the-road academically. Just having a master's doesn't mean you'd be accepted for another one, or mean you'd be accepted for the PhD. Bear in mind that at postgraduate level, some of the best mathematical minds flock to Oxford & Cambridge, so to have a chance (especially if you don't have a stellar undergraduate record), you would really need to ace your first master's course.

Oh, and you would also need to be absolutely loaded...
Oh yeah i completely agree about progression. I would have to smash my masters. I will get a 2:2 in undergraduate and I have a very good reason for this ( many admission tutors have told me it is very stellar reason).
So I would have to get at least a merit in masters.
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gutenberg
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(Original post by Mathmatician)
Oh yeah i completely agree about progression. I would have to smash my masters. I will get a 2:2 in undergraduate and I have a very good reason for this ( many admission tutors have told me it is very stellar reason).
So I would have to get at least a merit in masters.
Honestly, I would say that with a 2.2 at undergrad (even if there were mitigating circumstances, such as illness), you would need a Distinction at Master's level to stand out, especially for PhD applications. You will be up against some absolutely brilliant people when applying for mathematics courses, so having the best results possible is critical. At Cambridge, typically only people with Distinctions & high Merits in Part III get taken on for the PhD afterwards, and Part III is acknowledged as one of (if not the best) Maths master's-level courses.
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AverageExcellence
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(Original post by Vanny17)
Why waste money because of University prestige? It would be wasteful (time, money and resources) to do 2 masters in the same subject. Also, masters is only important if you want to go further e.g. University lecturer, researcher etc.

I would advise you to work in your BSc job area if it interests you (I am assuming you are continuing your masters in the same subject as your BSc) then work your way up.

Doing a masters costs money and it requires dedication. Why put your all into your 1st masters then do the same masters again in a different University? It would be beneficial to earn money first to both care for your needs and pay your masters fees before you consider doing a masters degree. I would not advise anyone to do 2 masters. If the subject and University prestige interests you that much, finish the masters at a low rank Uni and pursue a masters at a higher rank University.

NB: I would only recommend someone to do a masters if they want a career change or want to become a University lecturer/ researcher etc.
I wouldn't say a masters is just for academia, the job market has become so saturated with UG degrees a masters can potentially offer a candidate the edge.
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Jantaculum
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2.2 then Masters merit from a low-ranked university - no chance. The minimum undergrad requirement at Cambridge (set by the university not the department) is 2.1: this can be waived if the department wants to make an academic case for you but with a 2.2 and merit they probably wouldn't.

2.1 then Masters distinction from a low-ranked university - greatly increased chance. This would be a starting point for a doctoral level application. Oxbridge don't look so much at the university rating within the UK, they are more concerned with your ability and potential as a researcher, not where you studied.

Rather than worry about Oxbridge at this stage (I assume you're still an undergrad) you should probably just apply for Masters at the best departments you are eligible for and think about the next steps later. A second Masters at a higher ranked university might be silly if you can go straight to doctoral study elsewhere.
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Duncan2012
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You need to look at your career goals and attitude, OP. You don't even have an undergraduate degree yet but you're saying you'll get a 2:2. Are you really strong enough for a masters? There's no guarantee you'll get an offer of a postgraduate place with that. You say you "want to become the best mathematician possible" but 'you don't have the marks for Oxbridge'. If you got a masters then applied for exactly the same degree at a different university it shows you don't/can't/won't make progress in your field. While it might satisfy yourself on some level, and even if you could get an offer for a second masters degree somewhere, it would probably be an expensive waste of time and effort on your part.

Undergrad --> postgrad --> PhD or work

There's a reason people do it like that
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FlowerFaerie087
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Maybe... you could find another job in the field, get some experience first? Something other than another Master's, I really think. That sounds worrisome to me. Instead of weakening your CV by having to explain two Master's degrees, build up your CV and show employers/supervisors how truly awesome you are by having brilliant diversity of experience. This isn't rare, in my field at least.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by AverageExcellence)
I wouldn't say a masters is just for academia, the job market has become so saturated with UG degrees a masters can potentially offer a candidate the edge.
Generally its work experience that helps someone stand out and I say this as someone whose undertaking a Masters now
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sj27
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One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that Ox and Cam don't tend to look favorably on people applying for a duplicate masters because it's clear then that all the person is interested in is the university name.
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AverageExcellence
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(Original post by jelly1000)
Generally its work experience that helps someone stand out and I say this as someone whose undertaking a Masters now
Experience is key but not all employment fields offer obvious accessible work experience opportunities.. Getting 'experience' is only good if its relevant work experience, You look at many research roles or diplomatic jobs request you are educated to Postgrad standard, most emigration opportunities if you wish to go too preferably like to see postgrad educated people too..

It depends on the Employer and field.. public sector definitely like it, if you had to pick between a UG with no experience or a PG with no experience you would go with the latter, its only 12 months too, so unless you could ensure you'd make those 12 months count to the max with kick ass golden experience then it stands to reason that a PG would put you forward.
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Zefiros
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(Original post by sj27)
One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that Ox and Cam don't tend to look favorably on people applying for a duplicate masters because it's clear then that all the person is interested in is the university name.
I am on an Oxbridge masters in TS's field. There are at least two people with Oxbridge undergrad masters on my course.
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sj27
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(Original post by Zefiros)
I am on an Oxbridge masters in TS's field. There are at least two people with Oxbridge undergrad masters on my course.
Presumably not duplicate, or what's the point? And also clearly not quite the same as what the OP is looking at either, as Part III maths is the same year whether you are doing it as part of a Cam undergrad masters or coming from another uni just for the masters year. In this thread he has just said 'Oxbridge masters' but in others he said he wanted to do part III at Cam. So this is what I am thinking of.

To be honest I think the OP's chances are slim even if he aces his master's as I believe his undergrad will still count against him. Remember this is a course that pretty much gets the best of the best in maths at this level. I know that there have been stellar US undergrads from ivy leagues for example who do Part III maths to gain them a better chance of admission to the top U.S. maths PhDs, who all come in with pretty much 4.0 GPAs. People who don't say "oh that particular course didn't interest me much so I didn't do well in it". So in addition to that, the OP still has to convince them there is a reason other than name to do it.

Of course if OP has lowered his sights a little from Part III maths to some other generic 'Oxbridge masters' it may be a little easier to get in.
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