papyt
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How do you manage to continue talking for 60 minutes or whatever the length of an average lecture is?

Are your lectures based on a mix of material that you studied when you were doing your Phd and your current and recent research?
I''m just curious as to how you remember so much information and how you fit in the reading and preparation required.
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Roving Fish
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I've not actually seen a lecturer around these parts!

Of course, you're assuming that they've done a PhD - when in fact many just have an undergrad and have done a postgrad teaching certificate.

It helps that they're generally passionate about their subject?
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Origami Bullets
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I'm not a lecturer, but I do deliver presentations as part of my job.

I find it's all about
- knowing your topic inside out - this info will not be new to the lecturers
- practicing it
- adding bits and taking other bits out depending on how things go - the people in front of you don't know what you intended to tell them, so they don't know when you've gone "wrong"
- using the notes section on PowerPoint
- remembering that it is possible to set PowerPoint up to display the notes on the screen that faces the presenter but not on the projector

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superwolf
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My dad lectures in computer science - while I've yet to witness him doing a full-scale lecture, I suspect he relies on both his passion for his subject, and his inability to realise why some other people would be less than fascinated by it.
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Magdatrix >_<
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(Original post by papyt)
How do you manage to continue talking for 60 minutes or whatever the length of an average lecture is?

Are your lectures based on a mix of material that you studied when you were doing your Phd and your current and recent research?
I''m just curious as to how you remember so much information and how you fit in the reading and preparation required.
I'm not a proper lecturer yet but I do teach seminars (very different from just you talking for the whole time of course!)

I'd say that, compared to seminar work (which requires a lot of last-minute-reading/staying a week ahead of the students), lecturing relies more on the knowledge you already have. Mostly, lecturers are asked to lecture within their area of expertise (again, as opposed to seminars, where the groups sometimes get divvied up to whoever is available - I've had so many topics that I'd never studied before!) so you have that to draw on. It's pretty easy to go off on a tangent when you're talking about something you know really well and are really interested in, so I can't imagine running out of things to say in a lecture - in fact the opposite is probably true - many lectures I've attended have talked so in depth about the first concept that the remaining stuff is left untouched!

The problem I would imagine is getting thirsty. I swear I need a drink every five minutes just working silently at my desk! If the first key is expertise and enthusiasm, the second key to talking for that long is remembering to bring a beverage...
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gutenberg
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I have lectured a few times, and I can say that most undergraduate lectures are often far below the level that we work at for our PhDs (at least in terms of detail), so remembering material and concepts isn't really too much of an issue. More experienced lecturers will probably have delivered many of the lectures before (maybe even a dozen or more times, depending on the subject) and so can work from memory. Others may use a skeleton outline of major points they want to say, to make sure they don't go off on a tangent and leave out something important. When I first lectured, I pretty much had a prepared script, to make sure I covered every point in as clear as manner as possible. These of course take time to prepare, and many lecturers spend quite a few weeks before each term preparing their teaching materials, doing reading etc. As new research is generated, the case studies or details presented in a lecture may change, but often the foundation materials won't, so practice and experience mean you could probably deliver 85% of the same lecture each year.

In terms of speaking for that long, the key is to bring water or some kind of drink with you, and have a swig every so often. But lecturers also develop a way of speaking which puts less pressure on the throat: it involves controlling your breathing, and trying to speak from as deep inside the body as possible, if that doesn't sound too weird! Lectures are in some senses a performance, and so performance techniques often come in handy
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