Nadnight258
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hi, I'm interested in doing a chemistry degree because I find the subject fascinating and I'm good at it (one of the few subjects that ticks the enjoy AND good at boxes) but I don't know what I'd do with it. Obviously it's a respectable degree and just because you do a degree in one subject, it doesn't mean you are restricted to jobs in the area only. What else is there besides research and teaching?
0
reply
longsightdon
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Yo! I'm also planning on applying for a chemistry degree this october. I believe a chemistry degree can get you into a really wide range of jobs seeing as its the skills which you gain from it which can be applied to many jobs. I guess this is the same for all science degrees. Quite a few chemistry graduates go on into finance where a ton of different jobs are available. A family relative of mine studied biochemistry at university and is now a chartered accountant so a science degree doesn't restrict your options, it only expands them. Personally I would like to become a chemistry teacher
0
reply
Zeegie
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Nadnight258)
Hi, I'm interested in doing a chemistry degree because I find the subject fascinating and I'm good at it (one of the few subjects that ticks the enjoy AND good at boxes) but I don't know what I'd do with it. Obviously it's a respectable degree and just because you do a degree in one subject, it doesn't mean you are restricted to jobs in the area only. What else is there besides research and teaching?

Hey, Chemistry student here, just finished my second yr.

Chemistry is a really versatile degree, and it varies HUGELY at degree level, depending upon which University you go to, and how the course is structured there as in which areas the department likes to focus on, whether it be more organic or more physical etc.

Chemistry is a STEM subject. Alongside Maths, and Physics, it is highly targeted by employers outside of scientific fields, as another poster mentioned above, quite a few Chem grads look into finance, whether it be banking or accountancy. Medicine is another option (post grad).

If you would like to stay within a scientific field as your chosen career, a masters/PhD program is hugely preferable, which is another thing you might like to consider. Business-focused environments within, say, Oil & Gas companies, wouldn't be so picky on what degree you choose as long as you get a 2:1 generally, but purely research and development fields prefer a further course of study after your undergrad degree.

Having said all the above, there is a huge demand for STEM students in areas outside of science, particularly business and finance because of the mathematical and analytical capabilities the students that study these degrees possess. Equip that with solid extracurricular activities/work experience and you could pretty much target any sector.
0
reply
jac_x
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
I was thinking of going along the route of a chemistry degree…what A levels have you lot taken?
0
reply
periodicity
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by jac_x)
I was thinking of going along the route of a chemistry degree…what A levels have you lot taken?
You want to do chemistry and maths, physics/further maths are both very helpful (at least as my uni, oxford) and biology can also be useful (but not as useful as physics/further maths)
0
reply
longsightdon
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by periodicity)
You want to do chemistry and maths, physics/further maths are both very helpful (at least as my uni, oxford) and biology can also be useful (but not as useful as physics/further maths)
would not taking physics or further maths put me at a disadvantage?
0
reply
periodicity
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by longsightdon)
would not taking physics or further maths put me at a disadvantage?
You would have to probably work a little bit harder to make up for it but after first year you'd be at the same level as they teach it all to you. This is for my university though (oxford) which is quite a mathsy course. I believe other unis have less focus on the maths (e.g harder topics are not compulsory), or provide extra help for maths/physics for those that have not done the A level. Some unis give lower grades to students taking physics/further maths. Whether it will disadvantage you probably depends where you want to apply!
0
reply
Nymthae
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by longsightdon)
would not taking physics or further maths put me at a disadvantage?
Most places offer a first year "physics for chemists" style module - covers all the relevant bits you need to know. Again, the handful of relevant elements of further maths are taught during first year also as the majority of candidates won't have covered them. Pay attention in first year and there's no reason for either of those to hinder you. They won't disadvantage you for entry, the difference is maybe a couple of hours more work in the odd module compared to someone who has the grounding already. It's not a lot.
0
reply
longsightdon
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by periodicity)
You would have to probably work a little bit harder to make up for it but after first year you'd be at the same level as they teach it all to you. This is for my university though (oxford) which is quite a mathsy course. I believe other unis have less focus on the maths (e.g harder topics are not compulsory), or provide extra help for maths/physics for those that have not done the A level. Some unis give lower grades to students taking physics/further maths. Whether it will disadvantage you probably depends where you want to apply!
(Original post by Nymthae)
Most places offer a first year "physics for chemists" style module - covers all the relevant bits you need to know. Again, the handful of relevant elements of further maths are taught during first year also as the majority of candidates won't have covered them. Pay attention in first year and there's no reason for either of those to hinder you. They won't disadvantage you for entry, the difference is maybe a couple of hours more work in the odd module compared to someone who has the grounding already. It's not a lot.
what topics from further maths/physics are learnt in the first year if you mind me asking?
0
reply
periodicity
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by longsightdon)
what topics from further maths/physics are learnt in the first year if you mind me asking?
This year in maths we did vectors (calculus, planes etc.), polar coordinates, functions, limits, partial differentiation, taylor series, integration (standard ways, multiple integrals) transformation of coordinates, complex numbers, differential equations, matrices.

I believe the people who had done further maths (I didn't) had covered most of vectors, polar coordinates, taylor series, complex numbers, differential equations and matrices which was at least two thirds of the year.

In physics we did electromagnetism (electric fields, coulomb's law, dipoles, biot savart law, lorentz forces, waves, reflection/refraction), classical mechanics (newton's laws, energy, rotation, vibration) and gases (kinetic theory mainly)

I had done all of the classical mechanics material, some of the electromagnetism course and very little of the gases course before.

Even though it's taught in a slightly different way to at school I am very glad I did physics A level as it saved me time and allowed me to pick up concepts a lot quicker in my opinion. It isn't essential to take either a level however, you are taught all of it.
0
reply
grassntai
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
So basically apart from scientific research your job options are the same as every other degree? Well.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling about starting university this autumn?

Really excited (58)
21.89%
Excited but a bit nervous (121)
45.66%
Not bothered either way (34)
12.83%
I'm really nervous (52)
19.62%

Watched Threads

View All