GCE OCR/AQA Classical Civilization Books

Watch this thread
sydneylam19
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
There are so many primary sources and readings for GCE AQA/OCR Classical Civilization units. How do teachers usually support their students in learning? Do they print out relevant pages of reference books or make notes? What are some must-read reference titles to various units?

I would like to know what students read for their Ancient History units - Architecture and Art modules don't interest me, and I've already had plenty of resources on Latin and Greek Literature. I've checked out those long lists of teaching resources, but frankly no one is able to (and is expected to) finish all those books.

Thank you very much!
0
reply
BluWacky
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Depending on what history texts you're doing you might find the Cambridge Learning books on Greek and Roman Classics useful. Although they reproduce the primary source material (and usually in a different translation than the one set) they offer some useful structuring to break down events into chunks and offer lots of questions to think about. Not great with lower ability sets (are you teaching or self-studying?) as they're really geared towards undergraduates but I found the Alexander the Great one useful this year for AQA unit 4B and colleagues have used the Cicero one previously for 1F or whichever paper that is (I didn't use the Persian Wars one very much for 3B; I was rather uninspired with a class of pupils with various literacy difficulties so mostly had to read Herodotus to them... I'd do things very differently with time and different pupils!)

Things I found useful for me, although I've mostly taught these units to pupils with reading difficulties as per the above so basically provided my own notes distilled from these:

- for Alexander the Robin Lane Fox book is a venerable classic; I also bought Worthington's "Alexander the Great : A Reader" as it breaks things down nicely into topics, probably good as a thematic resource.
- for Herodotus and Aeschylus I didn't really use much in the way of secondary resources actually, I created my own notes from reading the texts (and used a bit from the Livius website?)
- if you get the chance give your pupils copies of the Very Short Introductions on whatever topic you're doing - the Alexander and Herodotus ones were very useful to "prime" them.

Just a few suggestions. Perhaps I don't "do it properly" - we mostly just chat about our interpretations of sources in lessons because I set them easy reading/comprehension preps alternated with thematic essays - but I like to keep everything as close to the primary sources as possible as that's what the courses are so heavily based on.

Possibly not very helpful - lord knows I'm not the perfect teacher and I should probably bombard them with secondary readings - but it seems to work okay and we have some fun, perhaps at my expense as I draw laughably bad battle diagrams on the board...
0
reply
sydneylam19
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by BluWacky)
Depending on what history texts you're doing you might find the Cambridge Learning books on Greek and Roman Classics useful. Although they reproduce the primary source material (and usually in a different translation than the one set) they offer some useful structuring to break down events into chunks and offer lots of questions to think about. Not great with lower ability sets (are you teaching or self-studying?) as they're really geared towards undergraduates but I found the Alexander the Great one useful this year for AQA unit 4B and colleagues have used the Cicero one previously for 1F or whichever paper that is (I didn't use the Persian Wars one very much for 3B; I was rather uninspired with a class of pupils with various literacy difficulties so mostly had to read Herodotus to them... I'd do things very differently with time and different pupils!)

Things I found useful for me, although I've mostly taught these units to pupils with reading difficulties as per the above so basically provided my own notes distilled from these:

- for Alexander the Robin Lane Fox book is a venerable classic; I also bought Worthington's "Alexander the Great : A Reader" as it breaks things down nicely into topics, probably good as a thematic resource.
- for Herodotus and Aeschylus I didn't really use much in the way of secondary resources actually, I created my own notes from reading the texts (and used a bit from the Livius website?)
- if you get the chance give your pupils copies of the Very Short Introductions on whatever topic you're doing - the Alexander and Herodotus ones were very useful to "prime" them.

Just a few suggestions. Perhaps I don't "do it properly" - we mostly just chat about our interpretations of sources in lessons because I set them easy reading/comprehension preps alternated with thematic essays - but I like to keep everything as close to the primary sources as possible as that's what the courses are so heavily based on.

Possibly not very helpful - lord knows I'm not the perfect teacher and I should probably bombard them with secondary readings - but it seems to work okay and we have some fun, perhaps at my expense as I draw laughably bad battle diagrams on the board...
Thank you very much for your reply!

Actually I'm not taking any public exam for Classics, but I'd like to know how teachers conduct classroom discussions since this is the only way I know how to self-study. Apparently I'm not in a Classics major, so this gives me even greater flexibility in appreciating Latin Literature.

I bought Wheelock Latin Reader and Oklahoma Classical Readers for Cicero - Oklahoma Classical Reader Series is very ideal for students. As for Caesar's De Bello Gallico there's a SUPER title by Giles Lauren, who includes plenty of grammar review, critical essays, discussion questions, notes and background information for the seven books.

I also refer to Cambridge Companions for History parts, but they aren't very user-friendly to me.
0
reply
username3481184
Badges: 3
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
get the OCR women in the ancient world GCSE route 2 if you're studying that topic, super informative and brief but detailed and easy to understand at the same time
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

How are you feeling about your results?

They're better than I expected (32)
32.32%
They're exactly what I expected (27)
27.27%
They're lower than I expected (40)
40.4%

Watched Threads

View All