Do you feel informed about the mental health services available to you? Watch

Poll: Do you feel informed about the mental health services available to you?
Very poorly informed (15)
28.85%
Poorly informed (26)
50%
Fairly informed (8)
15.38%
Well informed (3)
5.77%
Very well informed (0)
0%
Official House of Commons
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This year, the Youth Select Committee are looking into mental health and they want to hear your thoughts on the following questions.

• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?

• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?

The Youth Select Committee is a British Youth Council initiative and is supported by the House of Commons. It mirrors the UK Parliament Select Committee structure and gives young people the chance to scrutinise issues and hold inquiries on public matters they find important.

This is your chance to share your comments with the Committee who will be holding the Government to account. Some may be chosen to feed into evidence sessions with the Committee and members of the public, and may be included in the Committee’s final report. You can join the conversation on Twitter too, using the hashtag #YouthSelect.

Join the conversation and influence the work of Parliament!
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Official House of Commons)
This year, the Youth Select Committee are looking into mental health and they want to hear your thoughts on the following questions.

• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?

• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?

The Youth Select Committee is a British Youth Council initiative and is supported by the House of Commons. It mirrors the UK Parliament Select Committee structure and gives young people the chance to scrutinise issues and hold inquiries on public matters they find important.

This is your chance to share your comments with the Committee who will be holding the Government to account. Some may be chosen to feed into evidence sessions with the Committee and members of the public, and may be included in the Committee’s final report. You can join the conversation on Twitter too, using the hashtag #YouthSelect.

Join the conversation and influence the work of Parliament!
1. education into mental health at school at a reasonable age, teach children that it is okay to have a mental illness and that it is good to talk about it.
2. there isnt enough training or funding in mental health services full stop and teachers dont recieve anywhere near enough training in my opinion
3. self harm promoting websites and pro ana websites and the like should be banned when possible. there is some good quality information out there but its mostly on charitable website not the nhs or government websites where it should be
4. waiting lists are too long for services to be accessible only those who are in crisis get help, more needs to be done to stop it getting to that point and hopefully children will then have better mental health as adults.
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(Original post by Official House of Commons)
This year, the Youth Select Committee are looking into mental health and they want to hear your thoughts on the following questions.
• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?
• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?
• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?
• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?
The Youth Select Committee is a British Youth Council initiative and is supported by the House of Commons. It mirrors the UK Parliament Select Committee structure and gives young people the chance to scrutinise issues and hold inquiries on public matters they find important. This is your chance to share your comments with the Committee who will be holding the Government to account. Some may be chosen to feed into evidence sessions with the Committee and members of the public, and may be included in the Committee’s final report. You can join the conversation on Twitter too, using the hashtag #YouthSelect. Join the conversation and influence the work of Parliament!
Q: What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

A: More discussion in schools/colleges/universities and better, more open Mental Health provision which if needed is accessible to students when they need it.

Q: What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?

A: My education was quite badly affected by poor mental health. I also had a mentally ill parent at home and was too ashamed to ask for support at school. Schools in particular need to be more aware of the home life of students so stigma does not get in the way of students being open and getting help for their problems. It is a very tough juggling act to achieve your potential when your mind is already weighed down by poor mental health.

Q: What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

A: in my experience it can be both an extremely helpful force and an extremely dangerous one. It all depends on the particular issues that the particular young person suffers from. If they are capable of applying limits to what they look at and they actively seek out support then what's available on particularly well moderated sites is often invaluable. Some of the unregulated sites are very dangerous and need more regulation/moderation to prevent doing or furthering serious harm to young people.

Q: Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?

A: Yes changes are definitely needed. At the moment the waiting times only dehumanise the whole process and leave young people and anyone for that matter out in the cold for lengthy periods of time when they are likely at their most vulnerable. This defeats the objective.As has been discussed on here the provision seems to be a post code lottery. And the waiting lists make them inappropriate and inaccessible at points when they're actually needed. More needs to be done at the lesser end of the spectrum not just all the resources being put into Serious Mental Health crisis. This way things might be able to be prevented before they escalate.
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Airfairy
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• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

Well for starters make sure that GPs are contributing to that stigma. The number of GPs that I've seen that have an awful 'get over it' attitude about mental health is dreadful. They don't take it seriously at all.

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?

As a trainee teacher, I haven't had any training on mental health whatsoever. Also, members of staff at my school are REALLY bad when it comes to mental health. We had a supervisor off with mental health issues for a while and there were people saying he needs to get a grip because his job isn't even stressful, etc etc. Another teacher telling me her daughter's college rang saying they were worried about her daughter because she sounded suicidal on the phone and the teacher was saying that her daughter was exaggerating (could be true but shouldn't be discounted as something serious).

I think the pastoral/safeguarding staff have a better understanding of it than teachers.

• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

Online info is poor. It can be good for self research but I hate it when GPs send you away with a website link. If we suffer from mental health problems, chances are we have seen what is available online. We want something more.

• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?

They are accessible to a point. The waiting list is long and it is hard (actually impossible) to get NHS counselling outside of 9 till 4 which can impact on education. I think services are appropriate but providers need to stop thinking that young = a depressed phase. I think depression and anxiety are too often put down as a normal part of growing up and discounted.
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Arkarian
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(Original post by Official House of Commons)
This year, the Youth Select Committee are looking into mental health and they want to hear your thoughts on the following questions.

• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?

• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?

The Youth Select Committee is a British Youth Council initiative and is supported by the House of Commons. It mirrors the UK Parliament Select Committee structure and gives young people the chance to scrutinise issues and hold inquiries on public matters they find important.

This is your chance to share your comments with the Committee who will be holding the Government to account. Some may be chosen to feed into evidence sessions with the Committee and members of the public, and may be included in the Committee’s final report. You can join the conversation on Twitter too, using the hashtag #YouthSelect.

Join the conversation and influence the work of Parliament!

1.
I feel this question is incorrect.
I will respond to the question
"What more can be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards PEOPLE with mental health issues?"

I feel that the general health sector is still in the stage that they think they understand everyone who they deal with and that everything is as they say it is.
If someone walks through their door with a limp they just tell them to take painkillers and go home unless the person pushes for an X-ray which then takes a few months so the damage is either irreparable or healed.
(Yes it seems an exaggeration but I'm not joking that when I was actually dying I had to wait about 6 hours while they were getting minor patients out of the way because they were there first when I was basically getting poisoned from my organs.)

The same applies with mental issues, at least to an extent.
If a doctor believes you have something and you and your family and friends ask them to check out another thing they assume they know better.
(Which they may or may not, I can't say they won't know the answer but they will rush to diagnose something to get you out of their way without always considering the individual.)

It took doctors about 8 years of my whole family pushing them for them to finally realise I had scarred ear drums when we complained about my hearing, they believed to just use grommets and get it over with when there was rupturing and scars. Yeah, I'm kinda deaf because the doctors never considered anything after they decided what they wanted to think.

Again, if a doctor thinks you have a mental illness it is unlikely they will review it to see a change in behaviour.
They tried testing my younger brother for autism, to do so they put him in a room to ask him questions.
And they put about 20 people who he didn't know around the outside of the room meaning he didn't once look at the people or speak because they shoved so many people into the room who he didn't know in an autism test when they know that autism doesn't respond well in those situations.

I doubt many kids of like 6/7 would be able to casually talk to a stranger with 20 other people they don't know who never talked for about the 2 hours he was there. Like seriously, how inconsiderate can you get?
They have the diagnosis sheet with things that trigger autism and on that list is probably FEAR OF NEW PEOPLE or being unable to talk to tons of new people in a short space of time.

2.
Teachers are getting there, I've known some teachers to be really helpful when I was going through a few things, other people are totally useless, the preconceptions the older staff have and the lack of understanding they have means that they will target those with problems and take them away from their coping strategies to single them out on something they only barely understand because the teacher just thinks the student isn't trying when in fact the teacher just never actually spoke to the person like they were human.

The older generations of people are more tuned to their way of life rather than the one we live, if someone said they had dyslexia, a person from a time ago would beat them into spelling properly. If they had a stutter they were beaten till they talked properly.
Now we have therapies and other methods that actually work because of positive reinforcement and not negative, but the preconceptions of the older generations are normally what cause the most problems, either that or the uninformed younger generations treating mental health like a punching bag.

I speak sometimes quite often with people who seem to think that people with mental disabilities are useless and how they prefer targeting them because they aren't 'people'.
Young generations have no awareness of those around them and we are now in a community of instead of beating people into doing things, rather we ridicule them into worse situations, maybe in the end to finish it.

Many people I have spoken with online are happy to abuse me for things I say and multiple have hoped I die, if I bring up any of my health conditions people will actively try to say the worst thing they can.

It is really upsetting, but.
People normally have a 'mid-life crisis' when they are 40-60.
The amount of hell I went through meant at the age of 11, I broke down, wrote a will and everything.
Even to the extent of writing so many hate letters and actually giving them to the people I hated.
And yes I went that far after.

I'm still here but my mental state broke when I was really young. In a way I may be better off now for it than having it later.
So people insulting me and telling me to go and whatever don't matter to me anymore.
But I understand that it affects others because I'm not as much of a **** as some people.


3.
Even if information is accessible and visible, that doesn't mean it will get used. People get groomed online, why don't they tell anyone before they are anywhere near groomed? Why do people bullied online, even after being given sites daily never report it?

People don't use what is given to them, they need to be told or forced to use it because of their mentality at that point.
If people understood mental conditions more then we may be more aware, I still think that kids should learn psychology at school to help people with understanding others and interaction with people who aren't you.

People no longer are able to consider others naturally, if someone asks for help then a great portion of the world will either ignore it or now they will kick them.

While I was walking home with another person a guy asked for some money for food, we said no because we didn't have money (well I didn't) and after the guy went the other person just went "I hate people like that."

Wow. I still don't like that guys attitude, I doubt it was the guy on the streets choice to end up there, just like I doubt its people with mental conditions choosing to have them. But wow. Why would a person judge someone else based on where they live and try to do to live.

Sites that encourage negative behaviours should still have to abide within the laws of the country and with human rights,
(That is, if the conservatives and everyone who voted them or labour or any big party actually cares about human rights or even if they want the country to survive till the next election without removing all public services)
You should not be able to encourage people to die AT ALL or to assist them unless within a hospital where the treatment they would need to undertake (or that doesn't exist) is too costly or inaccessible to them and with the consent of multiple doctors who agree that their suffering would be too much and for the patient to suggest it first, doctors should not be able to suggest the option at all and it should require 3 PHD level doctors from around the country specialising in the field in question or near it (Not the one treating the patient) to agree about the situation to allow for unbiased opinions.


4.
Changes?
The system doesn't need changes.
The people in the system do.

The points you probably need to address most would be:

Harmful sites that encourage things like self harm.

The lack of understanding within older teachers and doctors and within the younger generations.
If you taught first aid to people in high school or similar there would be less risk later because multiple people understand how to deal with the situation. If a person falls off their bike they will know how to deal with the situation rather than calling the hospital who end up not needing to help because its a bruise but who wasted their time with a minor problem while someone is having a heart attack and not being helped because people have no idea how to help people in situations like that.

More attention should be focused within the young educational setting, focus should be applied to kids with sadistic behaviours and to kids who don't interact. Getting kids who don't interact with others to interact normally means they will be picked on for the special treatment they will be receiving. The sadistic kids or attention seekers would then hurt the object of the teachers attention to then get attention themselves.

Sure punish them. But the more attention you draw to them the more they will do it. Standing them in a corner for a long time will get them to understand they won't get that attention. If they keep trying to draw attention you should send them to the head of department and if they go past there you should phone their parents to pick them up.
If they cause another student harm it should be seen as assault and not bullying, I managed to crack someones head open sending them to hospital for a few days and they put it down to bullying and left it at that.

Outside the school I would be in jail but because I was in the school it was seen as a problem and dealt with by talking rather than action. If I was stupider I may have repeated my actions (because I got attention and all of that stuff that causes bullying) but as I didn't even mean it the first time the kid ran into me and fell back it was more of an accident. Plus I don't have the personality to bully people. (as you see by me helping in the mental health forums)

Kids have been known to take and use weapons in schools, sometimes the police aren't called and it is treated like a minor incident. If the kid did it outside or if an adult did it to the school the action would be different.

If you are trying to get kids to grow up and become adults they should see that their actions have a big impact on their future if the 'police' aka some actors dressed as police to teach kids that if they do it again they will be dealt with harshly.

(You asked for ideas, don't complain if they are effective)



But I do feel that physical and mental health should be a topic younger kids should understand, mental health can be applied to real world situations like interviews and understanding your own mental state and how to use it to be charismatic or intelligent. Physical health would help reduce severe situations if the public were smart enough to know what to do.

If someone breaks their arm, a person who knows first aid would know how to make a sling and tell the person not to move it and know how to make it comfortable, the person can then be driven to the hospital, rather than the ambulance having to drive over secure the arm then take them to the hospital, that extra time could be used for more vital situations.

Like I said before, if a person had a heart attack a person with first aid knows CPR and how to do it properly without killing the person, there have been many stories of how a person who knew CPR kept a person alive long enough for an ambulance to arrive.


Heres the red crosses website with true situations

http://www.redcross.org.uk/What-we-d...d-true-stories


If younger kids knew first aid you wouldn't have people phoning up with stupid reasons

Stupid reasons like :

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ashing-in.html


Being able to bandage your own cut after using a knife and slipping while cutting carrots or something saves the time of people who deal with saving peoples lives.
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What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

Education on mental health problems should be a requirement for PSHE in schools. If I remember correctly, they were only ever mentioned once during my seven years at school, and that was just a 20 minute assembly during year 13.

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education?

Going by personal experience, it has a huge impact on people's education. Before the start of my mental health problems, I was pretty much the best in all of my classes and everyone thought I had a good shot at Oxbridge. By the time I was at the end of my school education, I was basically failing all of my tests in every subject. Teachers generally don't seem to realise how much it can affect students' work.


•What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

I think there is a lot of helpful information online, however many young people do not seem to be aware that this information is available. Schools could definitely play a big part in making people more aware of the availability of this information.
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On Monday, the Chairperson of the Youth Select Committee will be joining The Student Room conversation to find out more about people's experiences and thoughts about mental health.

This is your chance to find out more about the Youth Select Committee and to share your experiences and be heard.


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(Original post by Official House of Commons)
This year, the Youth Select Committee are looking into mental health and they want to hear your thoughts on the following questions.

• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?
- Better education about mental health/mental wellbeing in schools (both primary and secondary) by integrating these topics into circle time (or whatever primary schools might do these days) and PSHCE lessons

- Providing points of contact, such as GPs, school counsellors and teachers, with top tips for spotting any tell-tale signs of ill mental health in young people they encounter, and training in how to deal with such cases sensitively. I think there is a tendency among the above named points of contact to sometimes mistake the early warning signs for "hormones" or "teenage growing pains" or whatever.

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?
It can be hugely detrimental to their concentration, motivation and participation, affecting their schoolwork and exam prowess. It can lead them to go off the rails whilst trying to find something else to numb the pain, like drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, legal highs, etc.

Teachers definitely do not receive adequate training in this area; not so sure about youth workers, school counsellors, etc.

• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?
Some websites, like the charities Mind and Rethink, and even the Royal College of Psychiatrists have very accessible factsheets on different mental health disorders, which can be very useful. There is a danger that online "tests" for "diagnosing" depression can lead people to self-diagnose and not approach their GP (even when the test is a legitimate test or the same ones that the GP would use, I would strongly advocate people to see their GP).

Websites that promote self-harm and eating disorders should be banned, imho, though I understand policing such a ban would not be at all easy and may prove unfeasible.

• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?
Not sure up to what age you'd define someone as young, so unsure whether you just mean CAMHS or whether that would include the EIS services. In general though:

- waiting times need to be shorter, both for initial assessments/referrals, and for therapeutic interventions
- everyone should be provided with SOME point of contact, be that a CPN, a social worker, etc. so that they have someone to turn to and someone who can update them on where they are in the system
- the above two things should not be a postcode lottery
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claireestelle
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
- Better education about mental health/mental wellbeing in schools (both primary and secondary) by integrating these topics into circle time (or whatever primary schools might do these days) and PSHCE lessons

- Providing points of contact, such as GPs, school counsellors and teachers, with top tips for spotting any tell-tale signs of ill mental health in young people they encounter, and training in how to deal with such cases sensitively. I think there is a tendency among the above named points of contact to sometimes mistake the early warning signs for "hormones" or "teenage growing pains" or whatever.



It can be hugely detrimental to their concentration, motivation and participation, affecting their schoolwork and exam prowess. It can lead them to go off the rails whilst trying to find something else to numb the pain, like drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, legal highs, etc.

Teachers definitely do not receive adequate training in this area; not so sure about youth workers, school counsellors, etc.



Some websites, like the charities Mind and Rethink, and even the Royal College of Psychiatrists have very accessible factsheets on different mental health disorders, which can be very useful. There is a danger that online "tests" for "diagnosing" depression can lead people to self-diagnose and not approach their GP (even when the test is a legitimate test or the same ones that the GP would use, I would strongly advocate people to see their GP).

Websites that promote self-harm and eating disorders should be banned, imho, though I understand policing such a ban would not be at all easy and may prove unfeasible.



Not sure up to what age you'd define someone as young, so unsure whether you just mean CAMHS or whether that would include the EIS services. In general though:

- waiting times need to be shorter, both for initial assessments/referrals, and for therapeutic interventions
- everyone should be provided with SOME point of contact, be that a CPN, a social worker, etc. so that they have someone to turn to and someone who can update them on where they are in the system
- the above two things should not be a postcode lottery
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Today, from 12 noon, the Chairperson of the British Youth Council’s Youth Select Committee will be joining The Student Room to hear your thoughts, experiences and questions about mental health.

This is your chance to ask questions about the inquiry and to suggest questions that the Committee could be asking in the evidence sessions they are holding in Parliament on Friday 26th June and 3rd July.

The areas that the Committee are looking at are:

• What more could be done to prevent stigma and discrimination towards young people with mental health issues?

• What is the impact of mental health issues on young people’s education? Do teachers and others working with young people receive sufficient training?

• What is the quality/impact of online information? Could it be made more accessible to young people? What is the impact of websites such as sites which promote self-harm?

• Are changes needed regarding the provision of mental health services? Are they accessible and appropriate for young people? If not, what could be done to improve them?

This is your chance to share your comments with the Committee and make your voice heard. Some may be chosen to feed into evidence sessions with the Committee and members of the public, and may be included in the Committee’s final report, which the Government will be responding to.
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Hi Everyone!

Due to technical difficulties the chairperson of the Youth Select Committee will be posting from this account for a short period of time.

Hello everyone!

I'm Rhys Hart, chair of the Youth Select Committee.

Our aim is to create a report into the mental health services for young people. So far, we have received over 140 pieces of submitted written evidence, from young patients to paediatricians and politicians, we now have a real variety of detailed and reliable evidence, and we are extremely thankful to all those who have submitted.

Our first oral evidence is on Friday 26th June and will give us more depth and a wide range of information from people up and down the country and you can follow this on BBC democracy live or follow our #YouthSelect.

Mental health is a sensitive but significantly important issue to young people, with over 90,500 voting for it in the Make Your Mark Campaign last year. I am eager to begin the oral evidence stages and I am looking forward to what the panelists have to say, but right now I want to hear what you have to say and it would be great if you could ask me any challenging questions or raise my awareness around any topics or areas of mental health to improve our report, and I can't wait to hear from you!
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Hi Everyone,

Thanks for sharing you stories!

Rhys will be back to hear your thoughts and experiences from 12-5pm on Monday.

Let's hope there are no technical difficulties this time! :^_^:

If you are interested in watching the Youth Select Committee's Mental Health evidence session this Friday from 9.30am, you can watch live and via catch-up on Parliament TV.
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Hi Everyone,

As it ties into the discussions that we have been having and it will possibly be of interest too, I thought I would share with you the at the Lords are debating the report by the Care Quality Commission 'Right here, right now: Mental health crisis care review' on Tuesday 30 June at approximately 5pm.

Watch live or via catch up on Parliament TV.
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Hi Everyone,

Do you think that you get enough education on mental health at school, college, university?

The Youth Select Committee would really like to hear your thoughts and suggestions!
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Hi Everyone!

I'm Rhys Hart, Chair of the Youth Select Committee, I will be head until 5 to hear what you have to say around the topic of Mental Health. Everything you tell me will help the committees research and could even be used in our report which is published to Government. So now is your chance to get your voice heard!

Best

Rhys
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(Original post by Official House of Commons)
Hi Everyone,

Do you think that you get enough education on mental health at school, college, university?

The Youth Select Committee would really like to hear your thoughts and suggestions!
In short, no. I found out about mental health problems more through soap operas, friends going through it and then going through it myself, as opposed to in any educational establishment. In an ideal world there would be some national framework guiding schools on how/when to teach about mental health and establishing good mental wellbeing in secondary schools, FE colleges and universities. Heck, why not even start in Key Stage 2 in primary schools?! At the moment there is too much leeway for people to just ignore it due to ignorance or timetabling constraints. Whereas it's a very important issue and it needs to be taught and managed, but taught and managed sensitively.

I think there needs to be more provisions and guidance, even at university level. Some universities have an absolutely appalling track record of how they deal with mentally ill students, and yet nothing is ever done about it
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Official House of Commons
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
In short, no. I found out about mental health problems more through soap operas, friends going through it and then going through it myself, as opposed to in any educational establishment. In an ideal world there would be some national framework guiding schools on how/when to teach about mental health and establishing good mental wellbeing in secondary schools, FE colleges and universities. Heck, why not even start in Key Stage 2 in primary schools?! At the moment there is too much leeway for people to just ignore it due to ignorance or timetabling constraints. Whereas it's a very important issue and it needs to be taught and managed, but taught and managed sensitively.

I think there needs to be more provisions and guidance, even at university level. Some universities have an absolutely appalling track record of how they deal with mentally ill students, and yet nothing is ever done about it
This is really interesting, do you think it should be compulsory? Also do you think external experts would be best to bring such education or teachers who are trained too? Or both?

Thank you

Rhys
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royal1990
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#18
Report 3 years ago
#18
(Original post by Official House of Commons)
Hi Everyone,

Do you think that you get enough education on mental health at school, college, university?

The Youth Select Committee would really like to hear your thoughts and suggestions!
In my experience, certainly at school level- I never had any information relayed to me with regards mental health, though this may have had more to do with the fact my school was a 'failing comprehensive'. We occasionally had people coming in giving very generic, limited and vague speeches about depression and 'suicidal thoughts'. But this was never really something for which schools tended to talk about, and this was in the period of 2002-2007.

It seemed to be a case of- if the information concerned you, i.e. you suffered from low mood, depression or were suicidal then you had to contact the appropriate adult. It was never really covered in-depth- which I completely feel it should have been.

It wasn't that advice was absent, but for want of a better word, it was "useless". Young persons have and indeed then, had no direction. It was a very much 'off the beaten track' area, nobody really talked about it. I feel as a society we've made more progress about being more 'open', but I do feel that mental health professionals/medical professionals and indeed some doctors are non the wiser, and oftentimes treat situations in the wrong manner.

For example, my doctor is rather dismissive and oftentimes leaves me feeling 'irrelevant', 'insignificant' and 'unimportant'. Which of course starts of the vicious cycle. I feel this relates to teaching and the education sector just as much, if not more so.

Society is still very ignorant to the stigmas surrounding mental health, and in some cases trained professionals reinforce it inadvertently.

At college (between 2007 to 2011 for me) there was a much wider awareness and acceptance of mental health. We had people come in, and had regular slots for this. We'd have workshops about such issues. There seemed to be more understanding and appreciation for tackling said issues.

At University, the provision was probably at the highest in terms of performance I'd ever seen. Regular emails are sent out (in my institution), newsletters always state where advice is found, and the well-being team are fantastic!

I think this paints a picture really- and that is that somehow we seem to be scared of educating our 'young' generation(s). What we are scared of I do not know, but if we somehow entrust our knowledge of mental health in them from a young age, then perhaps we would not have this national crisis, with rising suicides and mental health illness.

I think we are doing things the wrong way. Understandably, funding pays a large part in this- and undoubtedly the provisions for mental health throughout my University education has a lot to do with the fact it was a privately funded institution. Schools and colleges that a are government backed do not have such a luxury. But I feel the direction needs to be changed. With more emphasis on teaching coping skills from a young age so that our children and adults of the future can better prepare for their futures on our busy, often dramatic planet.
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Official House of Commons
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#19
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#19
(Original post by royal1990)
In my experience, certainly at school level- I never had any information relayed to me with regards mental health, though this may have had more to do with the fact my school was a 'failing comprehensive'. We occasionally had people coming in giving very generic, limited and vague speeches about depression and 'suicidal thoughts'. But this was never really something for which schools tended to talk about, and this was in the period of 2002-2007.

It seemed to be a case of- if the information concerned you, i.e. you suffered from low mood, depression or were suicidal then you had to contact the appropriate adult. It was never really covered in-depth- which I completely feel it should have been.

It wasn't that advice was absent, but for want of a better word, it was "useless". Young persons have and indeed then, had no direction. It was a very much 'off the beaten track' area, nobody really talked about it. I feel as a society we've made more progress about being more 'open', but I do feel that mental health professionals/medical professionals and indeed some doctors are non the wiser, and oftentimes treat situations in the wrong manner.

For example, my doctor is rather dismissive and oftentimes leaves me feeling 'irrelevant', 'insignificant' and 'unimportant'. Which of course starts of the vicious cycle. I feel this relates to teaching and the education sector just as much, if not more so.

Society is still very ignorant to the stigmas surrounding mental health, and in some cases trained professionals reinforce it inadvertently.

At college (between 2007 to 2011 for me) there was a much wider awareness and acceptance of mental health. We had people come in, and had regular slots for this. We'd have workshops about such issues. There seemed to be more understanding and appreciation for tackling said issues.

At University, the provision was probably at the highest in terms of performance I'd ever seen. Regular emails are sent out (in my institution), newsletters always state where advice is found, and the well-being team are fantastic!

I think this paints a picture really- and that is that somehow we seem to be scared of educating our 'young' generation(s). What we are scared of I do not know, but if we somehow entrust our knowledge of mental health in them from a young age, then perhaps we would not have this national crisis, with rising suicides and mental health illness.

I think we are doing things the wrong way. Understandably, funding pays a large part in this- and undoubtedly the provisions for mental health throughout my University education has a lot to do with the fact it was a privately funded institution. Schools and colleges that a are government backed do not have such a luxury. But I feel the direction needs to be changed. With more emphasis on teaching coping skills from a young age so that our children and adults of the future can better prepare for their futures on our busy, often dramatic planet.
So you think the current education needs to be more in depth and extensive? Also do you feel your doctor could have training in how to approach patients?

The stigma is a challenge could you tell me of anyways it could be reduced? Also people coming into the school provided the best education around mental health is there anyway this could have been improved?

The part about the university emails seem to be really effective! Do you think it would be useful to use more social media in this way?

Finally do you see funding as a common cause of the lack of education around mental health?

This is really useful stuff thank you!

Rhys
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royal1990
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#20
Report 3 years ago
#20
(Original post by Official House of Commons)
So you think the current education needs to be more in depth and extensive? Also do you feel your doctor could have training in how to approach patients?

The stigma is a challenge could you tell me of anyways it could be reduced? Also people coming into the school provided the best education around mental health is there anyway this could have been improved?

The part about the university emails seem to be really effective! Do you think it would be useful to use more social media in this way?

Finally do you see funding as a common cause of the lack of education around mental health?

This is really useful stuff thank you!

Rhys
So you think the current education needs to be more in depth and extensive? Also do you feel your doctor could have training in how to approach patients?

A: Absolutely, certainly more extensive. I think schools need to introduce it within the curriculum in Year 6, and give it just as much importance, as the "Maths, English and Science" at Years 7,8,9. Because why must it not be? Having the will to carry on when you feel low, is equally, if not of more importance than being able to count to ten, spell, read, write and grasp scientific fact. Furthermore, it seems ridiculous having someone whom can have all these skills yet if they cannot function within an adequate capacity enough to do a job, or live a healthy enjoyable life, then what sort of an existence is this? I think as a society, and most importantly this government is missing the point! More education on coping strategies and education on reducing stigmas.


The stigma is a challenge could you tell me of anyways it could be reduced? Also people coming into the school provided the best education around mental health is there anyway this could have been improved?

A: I think as well as doing the usual distributing of posters, NHS advertisement et cetera, more could be done to engage young persons online. I think that interactive materials which engage with younger children could be piloted, and certainly more engagement between teachers and pupils/students. I think it starts with the teachers-- they need specialist training to then instruct our children, to deliver workshops. In so many ways, I think the stigma arises from ignorance, the same with bullying as a generic subject. I think if government agencies work with the education sector to reduce this ignorance and educate people to learn more, than this would be a practical long term solution. Making this part of the syllabus at schools would be a first step.

The part about the university emails seem to be really effective! Do you think it would be useful to use more social media in this way?

A: Absolutely! Engagement across as many channels is very important if you want to target people of many different ages. I think platforms like Facebook and Twitter would be good for secondary school age. However, increasingly, young children seem to be addicted to the likes of Instagram, Snapchat and other pictoral style channels. It would perhaps be a good mention, for me to suggest, these places are a good place to start in terms of campaigning; video productions, podcasts, and visual stimulus.

Finally do you see funding as a common cause of the lack of education around mental health?

A: This is absolutely central to the issue. Funding funding funding. I think this is the real tragedy to many of the worlds problems. Not just the UK. But obviously, it applies very much to mental health. I think the NHS is bursting at its' seams with the amount of mental health concerns over the last 5-10years. Looking around the picture seems bleak. But I believe with more funding it could be viable for schools to start churning out such programs. Much like rehabilitation style courses- for those wanting to learn about, but also to those that have suffered mental illness. It should all be about prevention, preparation and building a stable vision for our future generation.

Additionally, I don't think that in many cases, it would cost much. I think its a case of current services and the infrastructure we have already, to work together more practically, efficiently and effectively. I think the problem (aside from lack of monetary fund) is how the system operates. The co-operation between schools, the NHS and charities needs to be stronger. Indeed, the government must have a hand to play in this too!


This is really useful stuff thank you!

Rhys
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