Question for Mixed race people Watch

Poll: Who raised you?
European/Asian raised by both parents (6)
37.5%
European/Asian raised by European parent (3)
18.75%
European/Asian raised by Asian parent (1)
6.25%
European/African raised by both parents (4)
25%
European/African raised by European parent (1)
6.25%
European/African raised by African parent (1)
6.25%
Asian/African raised by Both parents (0)
0%
Asian/African raised by Asian parents (0)
0%
Asian/African raised by African parents (0)
0%
capitalismstinks
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#1
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#1
Obviously there is a lot of combinations here, so i have reduced it to three categories: Asian, European, and African. Which gives a manageable 9 questions.

But, i am very interested to hear different stories because it is obviously more complicated than the 9 examples i have posted.
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username1504459
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What's the question? Our heritage?

I'm half White south European and half Black African with some Arab. I was mainly raised by my white dad and nan but my mother was (still is) very present.
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capitalismstinks
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(Original post by jedanselemyia)
What's the question? Our heritage?

I'm half White south European and half Black African with some Arab. I was mainly raised by my white dad and nan but my mother was (still is) very present.
No questions about heritage. Although, the subject of why some mixed race people reject one side of their heritage fascinates me.

I am just interested in how mixed race people were raised. I am mixed and was raised by both parents.
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username1504459
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(Original post by capitalismstinks)
No assumptions. I am just interested in how mixed race people were raised. I am mixed and was raised by both parents.
Oh ok. You have your answer then
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g10ab2
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I'm white British and black African and was raised by both my parents. Being mixed race poses many problems that people just don't or haven't fully accepted- the different cultures, pressure to be "one or the other" and confusion as to where you "fit in". My biggest problem was family- having two cultures, two heritages, two ways of life could often be hard to accept. Although I love it, it honestly it does create multiple personalities- part of my loves my African culture (music, food, clothes etc) but when around my white family I am as British as you can get (although this is stereotyping, Sunday roasts etc). People will say that racial differences shouldn't be an issue but the truth is stereotypes have their truthful origins and there is huge differences in the lifestyles of races. Me personally I grew up being able to fit in anywhere but never being fully accepted- you could relate to both cultures but you were never fully part of it. It's quite sad that racial backgrounds does have a subtle difference in the eyes of people but hey that's life. At home, we were an ordinary family- we are everything, listened to 'normal' music, and we lived free of social barriers. My parents taught me that race is no issue and now being older I honestly can hold my head high and say I'm proud to be mixed race ✨
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capitalismstinks
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(Original post by g10ab2)
I'm white British and black African and was raised by both my parents. Being mixed race poses many problems that people just don't or haven't fully accepted- the different cultures, pressure to be "one or the other" and confusion as to where you "fit in". My biggest problem was family- having two cultures, two heritages, two ways of life could often be hard to accept. Although I love it, it honestly it does create multiple personalities- part of my loves my African culture (music, food, clothes etc) but when around my white family I am as British as you can get (although this is stereotyping, Sunday roasts etc). People will say that racial differences shouldn't be an issue but the truth is stereotypes have their truthful origins and there is huge differences in the lifestyles of races. Me personally I grew up being able to fit in anywhere but never being fully accepted- you could relate to both cultures but you were never fully part of it. It's quite sad that racial backgrounds does have a subtle difference in the eyes of people but hey that's life. At home, we were an ordinary family- we are everything, listened to 'normal' music, and we lived free of social barriers. My parents taught me that race is no issue and now being older I honestly can hold my head high and say I'm proud to be mixed race ✨
This is a really uplifting comment. Thanks for taking time to reply.
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capitalismstinks
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(Original post by jedanselemyia)
Oh ok. You have your answer then
Many thanks for the reply. I updated my response before I read your comment because I thought I was a little brief but it basically says the same thing.
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Rakas21
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The more pertinent question would be to ask 'who are they loyal to'. There are lots of weird people who have Pakistani heritage ect.. despite being born here.. but are loyal to their fellow foreigners.
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Brownclown
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What I would've give to have some white genes
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bassbabe
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Don't really understand the struggle of connecting with heritage tbh. I have mixed race friends and none of them have had problems.
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g10ab2
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^in response to post above:

I think it depends on the person and circumstance. Some families (like kine) are completely different and racial differences is evident at a young age. Others only connect with one side of their family and so it's never an issue. Others just never pick up on it.

This is the difficulty with defining mixed raced people- there are so many different backgrounds and circumstances they come from that it's hard to understand anything about them tbh
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VannR
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I am the product of two mixed-race parents: a half-Antiguan, half-White (Irish and Eastern European) mother, and a half-Malawian, half-White (Scottish, German Jewish) father.

I am mixed-race to the point where I have no racial identity.
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capitalismstinks
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(Original post by Rakas21)
The more pertinent question would be to ask 'who are they loyal to'. There are lots of weird people who have Pakistani heritage ect.. despite being born here.. but are loyal to their fellow foreigners.
Yes, but this is not a mixed race question. More of a nationality question.
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RayApparently
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(Original post by VannR)
I am the product of two mixed-race parents: a half-Antiguan, half-White (Irish and Eastern European) mother, and a half-Malawian, half-White (Scottish, German Jewish) father.

I am mixed-race to the point where I have no racial identity.
That's pretty cool.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by VannR)
I am the product of two mixed-race parents: a half-Antiguan, half-White (Irish and Eastern European) mother, and a half-Malawian, half-White (Scottish, German Jewish) father.

I am mixed-race to the point where I have no racial identity.
Interesting. Who do your political loyalties lie with (i.e. assume the countries fall out for a fair reason)?
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German123
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(Original post by Brownclown)
What I would've give to have some white genes
I think you need help, you need to stop self hating and accept who you are because the reality is that you won't be able to change your skin colour.

Do you want to end up like Michael Jackson.

Genes and race are something you can't change.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by capitalismstinks)
Yes, but this is not a mixed race question. More of a nationality question.
Quite often, racial identity ties in. Africans and Muslims for example tend to express a lot of solidarity on political issues with their own. It seems to be Asia and the West that are more individual.
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Brownclown
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(Original post by German123)
I think you need help, you need to stop self hating and accept who you are because the reality is that you won't be able to change your skin colour.

Do you want to end up like Michael Jackson.

Genes and race are something you can't change.
Skin lightening creams and hair dye work wonders

That + a change in the way I dress and speak = goodbye brownness
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German123
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(Original post by Brownclown)
Skin lightening creams and hair dye work wonders

That + a change in the way I dress and speak = goodbye brownness
Do you want to get cancer, most of these lightening skin products are not really reliable and hair dyes can damage your hair.

Seriously, there are beautiful people in every race so whatever you look like, black, brown, whatever, you should accept that.

Most people seem to think that white is the colour to be, this is not true, you can't really change your skin.

Edit: Maybe you should see a therapist or something.
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Brownclown
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(Original post by German123)
Do you want to get cancer, most of these lightening skin products are not really reliable and hair dyes can damage your hair.

Seriously, there are beautiful people in every race so whatever you look like, black, brown, whatever, you should accept that.

Most people seem to think that white is the colour to be, this is not true, you can't really change your skin.

Edit: Maybe you should see a therapist or something.
White is the colour to be

If not that then a light shade of brown. It's no secret that in asian culture being lighter is seen as being more beautiful. Even black people these days are desperate to be "light skin"

Don't need a therapist. I need a DNA molecular Ray gun which can suppress the effects of my melanin gene
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