Why are doctors more respected and appreciated than nurses? Watch

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KittyAnneR
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It is clear and well-known (even just on TSR) how well respected doctors are. They have very high social status.

Doctors deserve recognition; they work very hard, train rigorously to qualify and save lives on a daily basis. But so do nurses. Personally I don't care if I am 'lower' in the food chain, although it is frustrating. I do what I do because I love it. I work as a care assistant in mental health...which is probably one of the hardest and worst paid jobs available.

Recently I told someone I was training to become a nurse and he asked why a nurse and not a doctor? I tried to explain that it's because nursing and medicine are two different career paths which require different skill sets. But he wasn't convinced. I see a lot of this on TSR too. Many people seem to be under the impression that being a doctor is a superior version of a nurse...when they are actually two very differing STEM careers that are both extremely valuable in their own rights.

Modern nurses are highly educated, intelligent, hard-working, autonomous and brilliant communicators.

Why is it that nurses are so under-appreciated in comparison to doctors?
Is it purely to with supply and demand?
Is it an archaic attitude linked to traditional roles of doctors and nurses?

What do you think?

Anyone who thinks nursing isn't STEM
http://www.publications.parliament.u...ch/37/3705.htm
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whydoidothis?
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Why is it that nurses are so under-appreciated in comparison to doctors?
honestly i just think its because its alot harder to get into a medicine course (AAA) minimum

.Is it purely to with supply and demand?
I think atm the NHS needs doctors and nurses, so no.

Is it an archaic attitude linked to traditional roles of doctors and nurses?
Yes there is, some people still think all nurses do is give you painkillers/serve you food at the hospital.
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Duncan2012
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Generally, doctors train longer, have more formal education, are paid more and often have greater responsibility for diagnosing patients. Nurses provide more routine 'hands-on' care, have greater patient contact and often have less decision-making ability. Each career is equally valid and appreciated, and people certainly shouldn't look down on nurses because of these differences.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by KittyAnneR)
It is clear and well-known (even just on TSR) how well respected doctors are. They have very high social status.

Doctors deserve recognition; they work very hard, train rigorously to qualify and save lives on a daily basis. But so do nurses. Personally I don't care if I am 'lower' in the food chain, although it is frustrating. I do what I do because I love it. I work as a care assistant in mental health...which is probably one of the hardest and worst paid jobs available.

Recently I told someone I was training to become a nurse and he asked why a nurse and not a doctor? I tried to explain that it's because nursing and medicine are two different career paths which require different skill sets. But he wasn't convinced. I see a lot of this on TSR too. Many people seem to be under the impression that being a doctor is a superior version of a nurse...when they are actually two very differing STEM careers that are both extremely valuable in their own rights.

Modern nurses are highly educated, intelligent, hard-working, autonomous and brilliant communicators.

Why is it that nurses are so under-appreciated in comparison to doctors?
Is it purely to with supply and demand?
Is it an archaic attitude linked to traditional roles of doctors and nurses?

What do you think?
I think many people don't appreciate how difficult and varied a nurses role is or have an apperication as to what they actually do. I m not sure the general public are aware of the autonomous aspect that many nurses have especially nurse practitioners for example asthma nurses.
Many people are aware that nursing is a shorter degree than medicine but may not be aware that nursing is 50% clinical practice whereas some medicine degree dont have much in clinical practice at all for the first 2 years.
I do think it is pretty archaic to be honest
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jazjaz
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I agree nurses should be better respected. However as another poster pointed with Medicine courses wanting AAA+ and most medical schools being at Russell groups some nursing courses requiring very low grades including Ds and Cs the reputation of Nursing is not quite that of Medicine. I'm a medical school drop out and years later I'm doing a Chemistry degree not as respected but I couldn't be happier
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claireestelle
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(Original post by jazjaz)
I agree nurses should be better respected. However as another poster pointed with Medicine courses wanting AAA+ and most medical schools being at Russell groups some nursing courses requiring very low grades including Ds and Cs the reputation of Nursing is not quite that of Medicine. I'm a medical school drop out and years later I'm doing a Chemistry degree not as respected but I couldn't be happier
theres nowhere in the country for nursing that takes less than BCC, most want more than that really. Nursing is pretty big on the extra circular stuff when you apply rather than the grades, if you dont have some decent experience with people then you ve got no chance really ( just shadowing a nurse for a week wouldnt ever be enough)
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KittyAnneR
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(Original post by jazjaz)
I agree nurses should be better respected. However as another poster pointed with Medicine courses wanting AAA+ and most medical schools being at Russell groups some nursing courses requiring very low grades including Ds and Cs the reputation of Nursing is not quite that of Medicine. I'm a medical school drop out and years later I'm doing a Chemistry degree not as respected but I couldn't be happier
I agree with ClaireEstelle, I have come accross nowhere that allow grades less than C. Most of them require at least Bs, PLUS sufficient experience. When applying, I found it to be extremely competitive and saw many very clever people get rejected. I am going to a Russel Group uni for nursing and on my course there are only 40 places. I know the reputation of medicine is better, but I just wonder why? It can't purely be based on entry requirements surely. Grades on paper don't make people better at caring.
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jazjaz
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(Original post by claireestelle)
theres nowhere in the country for nursing that takes less than CCC, most want more than that really. Nursing is pretty big on the extra circular stuff when you apply rather than the grades, if you dont have some decent experience with people then you ve got no chance really ( just shadowing a nurse for a week wouldnt ever be enough)
Ah that's good. Back when I was a medical student (5 years ago) you could get into nursing with CDD with one science which is a far cry from AAA with chem and bio the medics had to get plus the BMAT/GAMSAT. Whilst I do think a minimum standard should apply the ability to be a good doctor or nurse doesn't lye in academics alone. Both are hard working professions which better people's health and the community and that should be all that matters really.
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KittyAnneR
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(Original post by jazjaz)
Ah that's good. Back when I was a medical student (5 years ago) you could get into nursing with CDD with one science which is a far cry from AAA with chem and bio the medics had to get plus the BMAT/GAMSAT. Whilst I do think a minimum standard should apply the ability to be a good doctor or nurse doesn't lye in academics alone. Both are hard working professions which better people's health and the community and that should be all that matters really.
5 years ago you could study nursing at diploma level. Now you need a degree
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a96clark
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Being a doctor is pretty much the STEM side of Medicine. Nursing is more of a social science. And as we know, STEM>everything else, obviously.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by KittyAnneR)
I agree with ClaireEstelle, I have come accross nowhere that allow grades less than C. Most of them require at least Bs, PLUS sufficient experience. When applying, I found it to be extremely competitive and saw many very clever people get rejected. I am going to a Russel Group uni for nursing and on my course there are only 40 places. I know the reputation of medicine is better, but I just wonder why? It can't purely be based on entry requirements surely. Grades on paper don't make people better at caring.
I wonder if the people thinking than nursing is easy to get into know that less than 70 universities offer it.And thats only for adult branch. I had 200 hours hours worth of experience and felt sorry for the people doing a levels at interview who had barely any, even if they got 3 B's they couldnt compete with people who ve worked in caring environments already. Nursing has a lot more mature students applying too, which means plenty of experienced people you re up against.
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KittyAnneR
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(Original post by a96clark)
Being a doctor is pretty much the STEM side of Medicine. Nursing is more of a social science. And as we know, STEM>everything else, obviously.
Nursing is STEM
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claireestelle
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(Original post by jazjaz)
Ah that's good. Back when I was a medical student (5 years ago) you could get into nursing with CDD with one science which is a far cry from AAA with chem and bio the medics had to get plus the BMAT/GAMSAT. Whilst I do think a minimum standard should apply the ability to be a good doctor or nurse doesn't lye in academics alone. Both are hard working professions which better people's health and the community and that should be all that matters really.
they ve cut the places since 5 years ago as well as uping the requirements, i dont think a c in maths english and science was compulsory either.
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Helloworld_95
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Because it used to be that you would become a nurse straight out of school and trained at whichever hospital was nearest whereas medicine still required the same 5 year degree and that mentality that anyone could become a nurse has stuck alongside the sheer difference in pay scale. Nowadays for a lot of people nursing is probably the better career path compared to medicine, a nurse consultant earns roughly the same amount per year as a GP (more during early years or if you become a manager but that's a different route to nurse consultancy), a nurse practitioner or surgical care practitioner will earn only slightly less. So not only do you end up with similar amounts of money in the end if you take those routes (which are admittedly very competitive), you also have quite a bit of power and more career options after you've chosen your training. Might also have lower unemployment too given the massive increase after foundation years for medicine.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by KittyAnneR)
Nursing is STEM
group B ,subjects allied to medicine, so the government clearly agrees with us.
http://www.publications.parliament.u...ch/37/3705.htm
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monachus1
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(Original post by KittyAnneR)
It is clear and well-known (even just on TSR) how well respected doctors are. They have very high social status.

Doctors deserve recognition; they work very hard, train rigorously to qualify and save lives on a daily basis. But so do nurses. Personally I don't care if I am 'lower' in the food chain, although it is frustrating. I do what I do because I love it. I work as a care assistant in mental health...which is probably one of the hardest and worst paid jobs available.

Recently I told someone I was training to become a nurse and he asked why a nurse and not a doctor? I tried to explain that it's because nursing and medicine are two different career paths which require different skill sets. But he wasn't convinced. I see a lot of this on TSR too. Many people seem to be under the impression that being a doctor is a superior version of a nurse...when they are actually two very differing STEM careers that are both extremely valuable in their own rights.

Modern nurses are highly educated, intelligent, hard-working, autonomous and brilliant communicators.

Why is it that nurses are so under-appreciated in comparison to doctors?
Is it purely to with supply and demand?
Is it an archaic attitude linked to traditional roles of doctors and nurses?

What do you think?

Well I think nurses are great!
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claireestelle
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(Original post by a96clark)
Being a doctor is pretty much the STEM side of Medicine. Nursing is more of a social science. And as we know, STEM>everything else, obviously.
here is the house of lords list of subjects the ones in bold are considered stem. See group B.]

http://www.publications.parliament.u...ch/37/3705.htm
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Shakz
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because the journey to becoming a doctor is much more bumpy than becoming a nurse....
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claireestelle
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I quite like this myth buster
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/healthsc...ing-myths.aspx
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Shakz)
because the journey to becoming a doctor is much more bumpy than becoming a nurse....
elaborate?
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