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Best programming languages?

I think perhaps Python, Java, C++? Which ones will be more useful in future? The ones with highest preference?

Thank you for any help.

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Reply 1
Doesn't make sense to compare those three, they are used in completely different environments. Java is a corporate programming language intended for large scale enterprise development with large teams of people. C++ is a language for high performance computing in situations where speed is everything (embedded system, 3d gaming, etc). Python is a general purpose language.

For most people, Python will be the best choice.
(edited 8 years ago)
Reply 2
Original post by wanderlust98
I think perhaps Python, Java, C++? Which ones will be more useful in future? The ones with highest preference?

Thank you for any help.


Redundant question, to be honest. Pick a language and learn it. After you've got to grips with one language and can write decent-sized pieces of software with it, move on to another language and pay attention to how the languages differ and how you can implement the same algorithm across different frameworks.

There's a lot of people who say it's unwise to start with C or C++ because the languages is titanic compared to something like Python and works much closer to the metal, but that doesn't stop you from doing so. Learn a general purpose, flexible language at first. My first language was Java, and Java is really good for learning about object-oriented programming and virtual machines straight away, and it's platform-independent, which is nice. Python is another great language to learn first since it's syntax is simple and it's designed to be compact and fast to write.
Original post by KarMa611
Redundant question, to be honest. Pick a language and learn it. After you've got to grips with one language and can write decent-sized pieces of software with it, move on to another language and pay attention to how the languages differ and how you can implement the same algorithm across different frameworks.

There's a lot of people who say it's unwise to start with C or C++ because the languages is titanic compared to something like Python and works much closer to the metal, but that doesn't stop you from doing so. Learn a general purpose, flexible language at first. My first language was Java, and Java is really good for learning about object-oriented programming and virtual machines straight away, and it's platform-independent, which is nice. Python is another great language to learn first since it's syntax is simple and it's designed to be compact and fast to write.


Thanks for the feedback! I did some Python a short while ago, and in this case I guess I'll go back to it...
Original post by poohat
Doesn't make sense to compare those three, they are used in completely different environments. Java is a corporate programming language intended for large scale enterprise development with large teams of people. C++ is a language for high performance computing in situations where speed is everything (embedded system, 3d gaming, etc). Python is a general purpose language.

For most people, Python will be the best choice.


I see, thanks for the info. Guess I'll just stick with Python for now, heh.
Original post by KarMa611
Redundant question, to be honest. Pick a language and learn it. After you've got to grips with one language and can write decent-sized pieces of software with it, move on to another language and pay attention to how the languages differ and how you can implement the same algorithm across different frameworks.

There's a lot of people who say it's unwise to start with C or C++ because the languages is titanic compared to something like Python and works much closer to the metal, but that doesn't stop you from doing so. Learn a general purpose, flexible language at first. My first language was Java, and Java is really good for learning about object-oriented programming and virtual machines straight away, and it's platform-independent, which is nice. Python is another great language to learn first since it's syntax is simple and it's designed to be compact and fast to write.


KarMa's advice is excellent. Don't over-think your choice of a programming language and don't be deterred by the supposedly "harder" ones. Choose it and dive straight in.

I actually started doing some really basic stuff in C++ (if/else if and switch statements, loops, functions, user input etc.) and found it to be quite enjoyable. I am currently exploring Java and it incredibly easy to pick up the presented concepts as they tend to be very similar.

If you are interested in a Java or C++ YT tutorial, I can provide some links to the exact same video series which I am using.
Original post by wanderlust98
I think perhaps Python, Java, C++? Which ones will be more useful in future? The ones with highest preference?

Thank you for any help.


Depends on the situation. To be honest once you've learned a few it's quite easy to pick up other similar ones. If you had to do just one of those three I would go for Java. Then the best way to learn it in my opinion is to actually use it to code something useful (to you and/or others) - nothing beats actual application of the language. Good luck! :smile:
Reply 7
There is no such thing as a best or worst programming language. All languages are built to be good for what they were designed for.

So learning HTML wouldn't be of much use for someone who wants to become a low level machine level programmer. In terms of language for the future, anything can be the new hot cake. Take a look at Swift for example, it came out of nowhere now all the iOS developer techies love it (according to StackOverflow Stats).
(edited 8 years ago)
Reply 8
Original post by alex_hk90
Depends on the situation. To be honest once you've learned a few it's quite easy to pick up other similar ones. If you had to do just one of those three I would go for Java. Then the best way to learn it in my opinion is to actually use it to code something useful (to you and/or others) - nothing beats actual application of the language. Good luck! :smile:

I think Java is a really bad first language, because people who learn to code in heavily Object Orientated languages sometimes end up not really knowing how to structure code in any other way. There is a tendency for Java programmers to think that OO is equivalent to the general concept of Abstract Data Types, which leads to all sorts of confusion.

Typically I think its best to learn procedural programming without OO (using general ADTs) and then add in OO later in specifically in cases where its needed.

Java also forces you to care about things that you shouldn't have to care about, right from the start. This gets in the way of actually learning more important things, like how to structure code, how to think algorithmically, etc. Compare the following typical "first program you will ever write" in Java:



class HelloWorldApp {
public static void main(String[] args) {
System.out.println("Hello World!");
}
}


to the exact same code in Python:


print("hello world")


Java is just a really bad first language.
(edited 8 years ago)
Reply 9
Original post by Async
There is no such thing as a best or worst programming language. All languages are built to be good for what they were designed for.

So learning HTML wouldn't be of much use for someone who wants to become a low level machine level programmer. In terms of language for the future, anything can be the new hot cake. Take a look at Swift for example, it came out of nowhere now all the iOS developer techies love it (according to StackOverflow Stats).


The best is VB NET
OP look how easy is it to code

console.writeline("hello kitty")
Reply 10
Original post by poohat
X


Java is not a really bad programming language to start with, it's just verbose that's all. That's why many dislike Java.

Apart from that, Java is great and I'd recommend it as a first language. But I think I'd put Python higher than Java as a beginners first language.
Reply 11
Original post by naxiv
The best is VB NET
OP look how easy is it to code

console.writeline("hello kitty")


While VB is one of the easiest languages, I just don't like it. I enjoy the challenge of dealing with the less "English-like" languages.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Reply 12
Original post by naxiv
The best is VB NET
OP look how easy is it to code
console.writeline("hello kitty":wink:


Writing that vb code doesn't do anything if it doesn't exist in a proper context. The actual code is.


Module Moudle1
Sub Main()
Console.WriteLine("Hello kitty":wink:
End Sub
End Module


I dislike VBs syntax thugh
Reply 13
Original post by Andy98
While VB is one of the easiest languages, I just don't like it. I enjoy the challenge of dealing with the less "English-like" languages.

Posted from TSR Mobile


Agreed. VB syntax is just so urgh! But I still think it's cool, I still use VB when I'm helping people in VB, but I prefer C# or Java.

C# syntax is bootiful
I'd recommend Python as a first language (That was the first one I tried) Its got an easier syntax and is easier to understand how programming all works. I found C++ too much as a beginner language and I haven't had any experience of Java.

Preference wise, it depends on the industry. I only have experience of 3D/Games industry and they mostly use C# and C++ and occasionally used Python.

www.codeacademy.com has excellent Python tutorials that you might like.
Reply 15
Original post by Async
Agreed. VB syntax is just so urgh! But I still think it's cool, I still use VB when I'm helping people in VB, but I prefer C# or Java.

C# syntax is bootiful


Indeed, personally I'll always have a thing for HTML and CSS because I started by making websites. However for syntax I do love C# and C++, not that I'm much good with them yet, also if I'm in the mood I enjoy a bit of assembly language but that gets a bit repetitive and boring.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Reply 16
Original post by Andy98
Indeed, personally I'll always have a thing for HTML and CSS because I started by making websites. However for syntax I do love C# and C++, not that I'm much good with them yet, also if I'm in the mood I enjoy a bit of assembly language but that gets a bit repetitive and boring.

Posted from TSR Mobile


Assembly language you know, that's some big boy tings right there. Personally, assembly language doesn't tickle my fancy, it seems like a load of work. How does one handle an exception in assembly language? It's already a pain to do it in C#, let alone assembly.
Original post by wanderlust98
I think perhaps Python, Java, C++? Which ones will be more useful in future? The ones with highest preference?

Thank you for any help.


Pascal :mmm:
Reply 18
Original post by Zargabaath
Pascal :mmm:


COBOL is the future lol
Reply 19
Original post by Async
Writing that vb code doesn't do anything if it doesn't exist in a proper context. The actual code is.

Module Moudle1
Sub Main()
Console.WriteLine("Hello kitty":wink:
End Sub
End Module

I dislike VBs syntax thugh


I think i know more computing and programming than you.

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