jrivera
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi,
So theres this university in America (stanford) that I dream of going to. But unfortunately I live in the UK with 0 money to pay for the fees. They said on average it is roughly $56,000 for 8 months to study there. What shall I do to be considered at least. I don't come from a rich family, I'm not a varsity player either so I can't apply for scholarships. Unfortunately I'm not lucky enough to get straight A*s in my A levels but I did really well in GCSEs. I really want to study medicine in Stanford! But I don't know how I can get there.

Thanks!
0
reply
bestsnow
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by jrivera)
Hi,
So theres this university in America (stanford) that I dream of going to. But unfortunately I live in the UK with 0 money to pay for the fees. They said on average it is roughly $56,000 for 8 months to study there. What shall I do to be considered at least. I don't come from a rich family, I'm not a varsity player either so I can't apply for scholarships. Unfortunately I'm not lucky enough to get straight A*s in my A levels but I did really well in GCSEs. I really want to study medicine in Stanford! But I don't know how I can get there.

Thanks!
Hi! I'm an American (I'm on TSR because I applied to UK universities, but I've applied to US universities as well).

First of all, while Stanford meets all demonstrated need as NYU2012 pointed out, they are only need-blind for US citizens and permanent residents (i.e. green card holders). (Here's the link: http://admission.stanford.edu/application/international). The higher your financial need, the less likely they are to accept you in the first place if you're an international student, as they're allowed to discriminate against you based on whether you'll need a lot of money or not.

If they do accept you, they only have "limited financial aid resources available to international citizens." It's worth a shot, but don't get disappointed if you can't afford it at the end -- most internationals can't.

Second of all, in the US, you can't study medicine for your Bachelor's: you have to do pre-med. To enter the pre-med track, you can get a degree in any subject as long as you take certain biology and chemistry courses throughout your 4 years, but there's no Medicine degree at the undergraduate level in the US. Most pre-med students take something along the lines of Biology or Biochemistry, but simply doing pre-med won't let you enter the field of medicine after you graduate -- you need to go to "Medical school" after your pre-med degree, which is really competitive and MUCH costlier than a Bachelor's degree. You need to be ready to pay for around 10 years of higher education out of pocket (usually 30-50 thousand pounds per annum).

US universities care about grades (especially places like Stanford/MIT/Ivy Leagues), but they're not everything (as NYU2012 points out). You need to show them that you're a well-rounded person who doesn't *only* care about a specific subject (unlike what UK universities require). Things like playing the flute in the school orchestra or volunteering at a senior citizens' home count. Random activities like sports are useful too. You need to balance that with extracurriculars related to your subject, but showing that you're a fun person open to new subjects/experiences is just as important.

This was all too much for me, which is why I got fed up and decided to apply to UK universities. I'm strong academically, I don't have much money and I'm pretty much set on the subject I want to study (just like you seem to be). If you study here in the US, you'd be forced to take random classes you don't really care about (and waste money on those irrelevant subjects). Also, you need 4 years to finish university in the US (while it's only 3 in the UK).

I think it would be cool for you to apply to a few US universities if you can, but just don't get disappointed if it's not practically feasible for you to come here... Unfortunately, there are a lot of factors working against international applicants.
0
reply
vaudevillain
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
No point in applying to medicine. Aside from being competitive, you won't actually be able to practice in America as an international, and the likelihood is that standards will be slightly different wherever you're coming from, so you'd still have to do more school on top of the 8yrs the USA course would take.
0
reply
jrivera
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#4
So if by some miracle something happens that I get in to do a Bachelor's degree in Stanford before med school,

now what?
What are the specific steps to take after the Bachelor's degree?
Thanks guys.
0
reply
jrivera
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
Which country (UK/USA) would be the faster way to becoming a doctor and with less debt/ cheaper?
0
reply
gutenberg
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by jrivera)
Which country (UK/USA) would be the faster way to becoming a doctor and with less debt/ cheaper?
If you can get into a UK medical school for undergraduate study, then the UK is definitely the faster way to do it: most UK programmes are 5/6 years, versus the US system of a 4-year undergraduate plus 4 years of medical school. I would also say the UK is cheaper - you're paying for fewer years, for starters, plus the fees are significantly cheaper. You could possibly also receive some NHS bursaries to help with living costs.

You could also investigate doing medicine abroad. If a non-English speaking country didn't appeal, there's always Ireland, where the annual 'registration fee' for all courses is EUR 3,000 per year, although there are no government loans, and you would almost definitely need four A2s with top grades to get the required points for the Irish universities.
0
reply
mathplustutornj
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
The average MCATs for Stanford and other top medical schools are about 96th percentile for people taking the MCAT. 80th percentile is about average for students at ordinary US medical schools, but it is significantly lower for traditionally black medical schools and state medical schools in backward states. At Stanford and similar med schools, about half the students went to top 5 schools undergraduate. Pretty much everyone at top medical schools has top grades at top undergraduate schools.

Many of the US medical students' fathers are doctors (and often pressured them to be doctors and get top grades), and they can afford the fees for 8 years; plus their parents often make large additional contributions to the schools.

The fees are not that big a problem if you are a US citizen. I knew someone whose father was a lorry driver (it was easier to get instate admission being from a rural area of the state), who got loans from the government and also private loans for medical school. US banks will loan the money, expecting that MDs will make the money to pay it off.

To apply to Stanford for undergraduate, you need the kind of scores on A-levels for Oxbridge. Then you need to do well on US tests, and be able to simulate US-style extra curriculars to some extent. Then you probably need tuition money.
0
reply
rachiejames123
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
Hello

I have always wanted to study in america specially UCLA, but problem is I'm from the UK and dont have a great financial track and I also think it's useless now that I am 23, I want to study Health and Social Care so I can become a Social Worker.

I also know that I cannot/possibility that I wont be able to get a International Student Loan as 1. I dont have a US Co-signer and 2. I already went to university here in the UK.

So basically, is it a good idea to apply for any Universities in the USA?

Thanks.
0
reply
vaudevillain
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by rachiejames123)
Hello

I have always wanted to study in america specially UCLA, but problem is I'm from the UK and dont have a great financial track and I also think it's useless now that I am 23, I want to study Health and Social Care so I can become a Social Worker.

I also know that I cannot/possibility that I wont be able to get a International Student Loan as 1. I dont have a US Co-signer and 2. I already went to university here in the UK.

So basically, is it a good idea to apply for any Universities in the USA?

Thanks.
Probably won't be able to get that job in the UK with a USA degree and vice versa.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (519)
33.75%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (636)
41.35%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (313)
20.35%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (70)
4.55%

Watched Threads

View All