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    I want to do computer science at uni, somewhere in the east midlands, but I've read loads of stuff about computer science graduates not getting jobs and that computer science graduates have one of the highest unemployment rates
    I really want to do the degree, but only if it's likely that I'll get a decent job, so I'm not sure what to do
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    Your sources must be inaccurate. CompSci students have very good employment rate.

    Students who are computer literate are in demand. If anything, there is a shortage of skilled IT workers and more is needed. That's why the government is rolling out schemes to have Computing taught more in schools. That's why there's so many more schools now teaching programming and all sorts.
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    (Original post by anushapatel98)
    I want to do computer science at uni, somewhere in the east midlands, but I've read loads of stuff about computer science graduates not getting jobs and that computer science graduates have one of the highest unemployment rates
    I really want to do the degree, but only if it's likely that I'll get a decent job, so I'm not sure what to do
    Judging by how the whole IT industry has been developing for the last decade, the demand for CS, software engineering and IT graduates will always outpace the supply provided by educational institutions.

    This is evident by the universal efforts of governments around the world to promote computing in all levels of education and the insane boom of the industry as a whole.

    I am absolutely baffled by some of the perceptions people have about CS/SE/IT degrees. Just think of the possibilities and all of the sectors you can go into. If that is not your thing, you can always try to start your own project (this is definitely my plan).

    In my opinion, no other degree offers such breadth and depth in terms of opportunities. If the employment rates concern you, check the salary and employment statistics of universities which interest you. I can assure you that CS graduates are extremely sought after.
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    (Original post by Broscientist)
    . I can assure you that CS graduates are extremely sought after.
    Not to mention, completing a CompSci degree makes you a jack of all trades. So it's pretty much the master key to any type of career in the IT industry.
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    (Original post by Async)
    Your sources must be inaccurate. CompSci students have very good employment rate.
    Computer Science does have the worst unemployment rates, and it has done for a long time. A quick Google shows articles from 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2013, 2014, 2015...


    There's no obvious reason for this that it can be attributed to, but common thoughts are that some statistics encompass all computing degrees under the Computer Science umbrella (which means all the people studying ICT, Games, etc are lumped together with the Computer Scientists and Software Engineers) which can alter the figures, Computing has also been excellent at getting a wide range of students (it's reportedly popular with minorities, for instance) to study it and some are unfortunately discriminated against.

    The curious thing around all this is if you read the headlines regarding Computer Science graduates, you'll find articles saying they have the worst unemployment rate (leading you to think there are more graduates that jobs) whereas other articles say employers are having an IT skills shortage (leading you to think there are more jobs than grads).
    In my experience, it's both. Universities, on the whole, aren't teaching you the skills that employers are looking for and not many employers can take the time to take on fresh graduates that are clueless and properly train them up to a good standard, so many will be passed over at interviews.


    The IT industry is one that's very competitive, but can also be very good to you if you know what you're doing. It's life long learning, so if you're happy to do some studying outside of lectures to brush up on your programming, learning different operating systems and use different tools/processes/methodologies you'll be fine.

    Now, in my experience, the statistics are wrong as out of the dozen or so people I knew on my course, all of us had job offers before we graduated. If you're not clueless, you'll be fine.


    There are lies, damned lies and statistics.
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    (Original post by Broscientist)
    Judging by how the whole IT industry has been developing for the last decade, the demand for CS, software engineering and IT graduates will always outpace the supply provided by educational institutions.

    This is evident by the universal efforts of governments around the world to promote computing in all levels of education and the insane boom of the industry as a whole.

    I am absolutely baffled by some of the perceptions people have about CS/SE/IT degrees. Just think of the possibilities and all of the sectors you can go into. If that is not your thing, you can always try to start your own project (this is definitely my plan).

    In my opinion, no other degree offers such breadth and depth in terms of opportunities. If the employment rates concern you, check the salary and employment statistics of universities which interest you. I can assure you that CS graduates are extremely sought after.
    Thank you so much! I've looked at the employment stats for a few unis and they're pretty good so I think I'll definitely do computer science
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    Computer Science does have the worst unemployment rates, and it has done for a long time. A quick Google shows articles from 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2013, 2014, 2015...


    There's no obvious reason for this that it can be attributed to, but common thoughts are that some statistics encompass all computing degrees under the Computer Science umbrella (which means all the people studying ICT, Games, etc are lumped together with the Computer Scientists and Software Engineers) which can alter the figures, Computing has also been excellent at getting a wide range of students (it's reportedly popular with minorities, for instance) to study it and some are unfortunately discriminated against.

    The curious thing around all this is if you read the headlines regarding Computer Science graduates, you'll find articles saying they have the worst unemployment rate (leading you to think there are more graduates that jobs) whereas other articles say employers are having an IT skills shortage (leading you to think there are more jobs than grads).
    In my experience, it's both. Universities, on the whole, aren't teaching you the skills that employers are looking for and not many employers can take the time to take on fresh graduates that are clueless and properly train them up to a good standard, so many will be passed over at interviews.


    The IT industry is one that's very competitive, but can also be very good to you if you know what you're doing. It's life long learning, so if you're happy to do some studying outside of lectures to brush up on your programming, learning different operating systems and use different tools/processes/methodologies you'll be fine.

    Now, in my experience, the statistics are wrong as out of the dozen or so people I knew on my course, all of us had job offers before we graduated. If you're not clueless, you'll be fine.


    There are lies, damned lies and statistics.
    Thank you! I've literally been stressing about this but this has helped so much... I will defo apply for computer science at uni
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    (Original post by anushapatel98)
    I want to do computer science at uni, somewhere in the east midlands, but I've read loads of stuff about computer science graduates not getting jobs and that computer science graduates have one of the highest unemployment rates
    I really want to do the degree, but only if it's likely that I'll get a decent job, so I'm not sure what to do
    I think it really depends on the skills you end up learning, and the degree result you get.

    if you come out of university and you can admin MySQL, write some decent PHP and Javascript… uh, well look forward to some pretty boring and underpaid roles in your career - unless you can find some way to distinguish yourself from lots of other people with similar qualifications (or similar skills and no qualifications).

    On the other hand if you've written code that's ended up in, extended the capability or become a standard library for any of those (MySQL/PHP/Javascript, or any other significant environment) then you may be in a very different place. Likewise if you have written an application that has been well received.

    The essential problem is that there are a lot of people out there, coming from many different directions, who have aspirations to "code". The reality is that most of them aren't very good and struggle to find employment. Which is why the the stats aren't very good.

    You need to be learning and achieving at a high level in order to distinguish yourself from the crowd.
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    (Original post by Async)
    Not to mention, completing a CompSci degree makes you a jack of all trades. So it's pretty much the master key to any type of career in the IT industry.
    Thanks for the info
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    So what are the salaries like and how hard is it to get jobs etc? What things need to be done etc?
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    (Original post by Susta1nz)
    So what are the salaries like and how hard is it to get jobs etc? What things need to be done etc?
    Why do you keep asking the same question mate?

    You could just go on bloody glassdoor.com and do a search if you are so inclined.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Why do you keep asking the same question mate?

    You could just go on bloody glassdoor.com and do a search if you are so inclined.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I just wanted multiple opinions and viewpoints.
 
 
 
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