Most effective way to take protein/creatine? Watch

Rigg95
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Started consistently going to the gym 3 months ago. Seeing the benefits but been told I'm taking protein and creatine all wrong.

My usual routine: Milk, 2x creatine and 3x protein (heaped) after the gym.

Is the following far more beneficial?

Pre gym: 1x creatine in water
Post gym: 2x protein and 1x creatine in water
Pre bed: 2x protein in milk
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RollerBall
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It makes sod all difference. The person who told you it's "all wrong" should never be trusted for gym advice.

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BKS
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You're also probably getting a load more protein than you need. It's fine if you want but I'd rather have less shakes and more food
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henchboy
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It doesnt make any difference whatsoever , drinking protein shakes is basically the same as eating a chicken breat or a can of tuna etc.

protein powders/shakes aren't special, they are just there to help you get enough overall protein in your diet if you can't get it all from regular food.

As for creatine it doesn't make much difference, just fills you up with water weight and maybe help get a few more reps in.

Most important aspect of making gains is eating enough overall calories with a decent amount of protein daily.
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ALevelBro
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Agreed with the above posts, there has been a lie in the bodybuilding community that protein and creatine 'makes you big'. Supplement companies make millions of dollars and it's in their interest to keep up this lie.

Neither of them are anabolics and seeing how you've only lifted for 3 months you shouldn't concern yourself with this. Just eat and lift, it's not that difficult!
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Subedei
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(Original post by henchboy)

As for creatine it doesn't make much difference, just fills you up with water weight and maybe help get a few more reps in.
You're not really giving creatine supplementation the credit it deserves. If I had to choose one supplement to train with I would pick creatine. It literally accelerates and extends the intracellular energy transport system for anodise triphosphate to the myofibrils for muscle contraction. If you understand what it does and how your muscles actually work on a cellular level you will realise just how beneficial it is and that its benefits have been drowned and smothered amongst the ridiculous claims about the flood of pure **** that gushes from Fitness INC. every year.

The main advantage is recovery in between sets, and the first loading phase will increase strength by around 5%. It has also been shown to be effective when utilised as a treatment for several neuro-muscular and neuro-degenerative diseases and they believe they are only just beginning to realise its potential.

To the OP, it makes no difference when you take it. Personally I like to supplement with it in the evening when I am hydrating for the next day. If you are training in an effective way as a beginner (Squat/Dead/OHP/Bench) then creatine will make your transition to the intermediate level all the faster.
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Subedei
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(Original post by ALevelBro)
Agreed with the above posts, there has been a lie in the bodybuilding community that protein and creatine 'makes you big'. Supplement companies make millions of dollars and it's in their interest to keep up this lie.

Neither of them are anabolics and seeing how you've only lifted for 3 months you shouldn't concern yourself with this. Just eat and lift, it's not that difficult!
Technically, seeing as proteins are literally what the body is built from, then it is not really a lie to say that consuming protein 'makes you big'.

Also, bearing in mind that, put simply, creatine boosts the transport of energy between muscles. Then it follows that creatine, coupled with a disruption to homeostasis would 'make you big'

As for your last claim. I would say that proper nutritional supplementation is especially important in this beginner phase. As long as he is training properly, he can disrupt homeostasis, adapt and recover within 24-48 hours. This is what we call "beginner gains" every beginner should make the absolute most of this period in his training. Most have no idea how to utilise it properly.
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ALevelBro
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(Original post by Subedei)
As for your last claim. I would say that proper nutritional supplementation is especially important in this beginner phase. As long as he is training properly, he can disrupt homeostasis, adapt and recover within 24-48 hours. This is what we call "beginner gains" every beginner should make the absolute most of this period in his training. Most have no idea how to utilise it properly.
During my 'beginner gains' I gained 50 lbs in 7-8 months. Zero supplements, no protein shakes. Just ate 4 times a day and lifted three times a week.

Maybe once he's lifted for a year consistently he can start really thinking about a specific diet, specific workouts and consider supplements but for now just let him stick to the basics like everyone else.
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Subedei
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(Original post by ALevelBro)
During my 'beginner gains' I gained 50 lbs in 7-8 months. Zero supplements, no protein shakes. Just ate 4 times a day and lifted three times a week.
Well good for you. But I don't really measure the success of an individual in a gym based on how much he weighs. I base it upon how much his main lifts increase, and, removing factors like genetics and ****ty technique, if one person lifts without supplementing creatine and one lifts with it. The latter will make better and faster progress.

Maybe once he's lifted for a year consistently he can start really thinking about a specific diet, specific workouts and consider supplements but for now just let him stick to the basics like everyone else.
What do you consider 'the basics" and how exactly would you mark the difference between a beginner and an intermediate lifter?
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ALevelBro
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(Original post by Subedei)
What do you consider 'the basics" and how exactly would you mark the difference between a beginner and an intermediate lifter?
Basics ->

Core lifts (squat, deadlift, press, bench) and programs that only incorporate them like Starting Strength.

Aiming for 3000-3500 calories daily intake, making sure you eat high-protein food like meat, dairy, egg, fish etc. Don't even need to count calories, if you have 4-5 regular sized meals a day you'll be within your goal range.

In other words, eat and lift.

Generally an intermediate lifter is someone who's been consistently training for 1-2 years, at this point he established a strength base, got up to a healthy 'normal' weight after a life of muscle atrophy and lack of exercise. Gains with the core lifts are difficult or even non-existent, lean mass isn't being packed on as easily.
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Subedei
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(Original post by ALevelBro)
Basics ->

Core lifts (squat, deadlift, press, bench) and programs that only incorporate them like Starting Strength.
Yes agreed.

Aiming for 3000-3500 calories daily intake, making sure you eat high-protein food like meat, dairy, egg, fish etc. Don't even need to count calories, if you have 4-5 regular sized meals a day you'll be within your goal range.
Hmmm, maybe. I would say this it is far more effective to track your macros to prevent you a) getting fat if you are prone to that and b) not eating enough because you have no idea what a 500 calorie surplus looks or feels like.



Generally an intermediate lifter is someone who's been consistently training for 1-2 years, at this point he established a strength base, got up to a healthy 'normal' weight after a life of muscle atrophy and lack of exercise. Gains with the core lifts are difficult or even non-existent, lean mass isn't being packed on as easily.
If you like starting strength I would highly recommend Practical Programming by Rippetoe. It covers things like periodisation and actual models of different lifting abilities etc..

He defines a beginner lifter as somebody who can disrupt homeostasis, adapt and recover within 24-48 hours. (Which forms the basic of Starting Strength) and he defines an intermediate lifter as someone who needs 72 + hours to recover from a disruption to homeostasis. Hence why, at this point you need to start programming macrocycles and periodising your training.

With the right training and nutrition a healthy male can make the transition from beginner to intermediate in 3-6 months, there is absolutely nothing stopping this and there is no reason why you should still be a beginner after 1-2 years, you are doing something seriously wrong if you can still make a novice-style recovery after training for that long.. (Unless he was doing crossfire or P90x or some other ****)
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ALevelBro
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(Original post by Subedei)
Hmmm, maybe. I would say this it is far more effective to track your macros to prevent you a) getting fat if you are prone to that and b) not eating enough because you have no idea what a 500 calorie surplus looks or feels like.
It's not a bad idea to get 'fat' as it's easier to lift heavier weights... Better err on the side of overeating.

there is absolutely nothing stopping this and there is no reason why you should still be a beginner after 1-2 years, you are doing something seriously wrong if you can still make a novice-style recovery after training for that long.. (Unless he was doing crossfire or P90x or some other ****)
No idea about that, I quit the weightlifting after the original 50 lbs gain because I started consistently losing strength across all lifts, got frustrated and just focused on martial arts.

...Maybe I reached the intermediate level as you described it thinking about it now. The lifters I've talked to suggested otherwise.
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Subedei
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(Original post by ALevelBro)
It's not a bad idea to get 'fat' as it's easier to lift heavier weights... Better err on the side of overeating.
Haha, I used to tell myself that every time I felt guilty about an extra slice of pizza.


...Maybe I reached the intermediate level as you described it thinking about it now. The lifters I've talked to suggested otherwise.
If you stopped recovering within the beginner time scale, and found that you could not maintain your beginner pace with the heavier weights. (and if your weights stopped consistently increasing every workout) then you had more than likely reached the intermediate stage.

I would always lean toward the professional strength coaches for general experience-based facts. There is so much **** sloshing out of the fitness industry that many, many people get confused or conflicting opinions.
Ironically, if you remove internet articles, e-pamphlets and e-training plans, there are relatively very few actual books on strength and conditioning. Rippetoe is obviously the best place to start, I would also recommend Russians like Verkoshansky Pavlov and falameyev. Despite all of the posturing you only need to read a couple of books to have a knowledge-based advantage over 95% of 'lifters'
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ALevelBro
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(Original post by Subedei)
I would always lean toward the professional strength coaches for general experience-based facts. There is so much **** sloshing out of the fitness industry that many, many people get confused or conflicting opinions.
Yes, I know I read a lot of stuff when I first started and was really confused. Thus why I'd recommend beginners just stick to the basics and don't overthink and complicate anything. BB(.)com especially as it's basically one big commercial ground for supplement companies.
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Subedei
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(Original post by ALevelBro)
Yes, I know I read a lot of stuff when I first started and was really confused. Thus why I'd recommend beginners just stick to the basics and don't overthink and complicate anything.
Yeah I do agree. The big secret of the fitness industry is that when your'e a beginner, everything works. You can improve your squat on a stationary bike so they take advantage of this by marketing every program as some miracle program, or marketing the advanced quadrennial cycles of athletes to absolute beginners etc...

So there are less effective and more effective ways to improve your lifts or body composition or whatever. You can either take 3 months or you can take 3 years. Starting Strength is one of the best places to start.

BB(.)com especially as it's basically one big commercial ground for supplement companies.
Yeah, same goes for mens health and mens fitness magazines. Also, all of the self-appointed instagram fitness gurus.
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