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    I'm going to start sixth form in September and still stuck on what A Levels I want to do...
    I have always liked the idea of being a solicitor or lawyer but I understand that it seems to have some bad reputation :/
    To be honest the idea of working long hours and stuff isn't scaring me. It's actually making me want to take on the degree more! I enjoy the idea of helping people and even now I can spend hours trying to help people.
    My only concern is that it also looks really risky as I've heard stories about how lots of graduates don't manage to find a job and get into major debt.
    Like most people I want to be successful and well off and law just seems to have this appealing aspect of it.
    Does anyone do/have done Law here? Would you recommend it? I don't mind taking a risk... But the fact is that I don't come from a well off family and if it doesn't work out for me then life will just go spiral from there on. The thought of having to graduate Law school after daunts me too... More debt
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    I don't know where you heard that Law graduates have a hard time finding a job, it has the 9th highest employability rate for degrees:
    http://www.theguardian.com/news/data...ty-and-subject
    I think in some parts of America there is some graduates not finding jobs, which may be where your heard it?
    It is one of the most highly regarded degrees you can get

    Some types of lawyers, especially corporate lawyers, do have to work long hours, but you can't expect to make the large salary only having to work a few hours a day

    Edit: Are you talking about Law in UK or US, because you are talking about graduating Law school after, which you do in the US
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    (Original post by zigglr)
    I don't know where you heard that Law graduates have a hard time finding a job, it has the 9th highest employability rate for degrees:
    http://www.theguardian.com/news/data...ty-and-subject
    I think in some parts of America there is some graduates not finding jobs, which may be where your head it?
    It is one of the most highly regarded degrees you can get

    Some types of lawyers, especially corporate lawyers, do have to work long hours, but you can't expect to make the large salary only having to work a few hours a day
    If I just type in "Law Degree" on Google there's like loads of articles from people who regret doing law lol. Do you have any experience in the filed?


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    (Original post by hotmom)
    If I just type in "Law Degree" on Google there's like loads of articles from people who regret doing law lol. Do you have any experience in the filed?


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    I can only presume they regret it either because they didn't find it as interesting as they thought or because they don't like working a lot of hours, which is why it's important to do a lot of research into what degree you'd like to do. I'm about to study Law at Uni so no experience yet
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    (Original post by hotmom)
    If I just type in "Law Degree" on Google there's like loads of articles from people who regret doing law lol. Do you have any experience in the filed?


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    The thing you have to consider is that Law is very popular. Everyone dreams of working in the Suits world with Mike Ross and Harvey Specter. Unfortunately, a lot of people will perform poorly at A-Level and still cling onto that dream, and end up at a university which offers them very little in terms of employment prospects. However, if you attend a decent uni (most RGs are good), you should be OK and less likely to have a horror story post-graduation. However, a lot of people do study Law and then drop out because the course is simply too demanding. That is something to consider.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    However, if you attend a decent uni (most RGs are good), you should be OK and less likely to have a horror story post-graduation.
    Are you saying that only people attending 'most' Russell Group Unis can find employment as a Lawyer?
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    (Original post by zigglr)
    Are you saying that only people attending 'most' Russell Group Unis can find employment as a Lawyer?
    No. I said their employment prospects are quite good.

    I assumed the horror stories were of people graduating from very poor universities where 44% find work/ further study within 6 months, where they are quite literally less employable for having being to university, and end up on JSA. I am saying that type of thing won't happen at most RG unis.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    No. I said their employment prospects are quite good.

    I assumed the horror stories were of people graduating from very poor universities where 44% find work/ further study within 6 months, where they are quite literally less employable for having being to university, and end up on JSA. I am saying that type of thing won't happen at most RG unis.
    So basically... If I managed to get into a really good uni for law I will have just as a a good chance of employment as someone who did a medicine degree?
    Additionally, after I complete a law degree is it expected of me to go to Law school? I head that you can get a job with some firms and they can fund you?


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    (Original post by zigglr)
    I can only presume they regret it either because they didn't find it as interesting as they thought or because they don't like working a lot of hours, which is why it's important to do a lot of research into what degree you'd like to do. I'm about to study Law at Uni so no experience yet
    You don't seem to know much about the actual practice of law. It's very hard to land a training contract these days as the amount of law graduates relative to training contract places is obscenely high. Plus many law firms hire non-law graduates too, adding extra competition. Without landing a training contract, no law student is going to be able to land a job as a lawyer.

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    (Original post by hotmom)
    So basically... If I managed to get into a really good uni for law I will have just as a a good chance of employment as someone who did a medicine degree?
    Additionally, after I complete a law degree is it expected of me to go to Law school? I head that you can get a job with some firms and they can fund you?


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    Not certainly not medicine, no. However, the people who complain about the value of a law degree are usually the people who studied at Sunderland University or somewhere equally irrelevant. With a good uni, your degree will have worth. That's not to say you'll be guaranteed a grad job, though.

    We don't really have law schools in the UK. If you mean, is it expected that you'll complete the LPC (the course required to become a solicitor) or the BPTC (the course required to become a barrister), no; in fact, most people who have an LLB will not go onto either stage. They will mostly go into business. Now if you were to study history at Durham or Law at Warwick, which one would you get the better grad prospects when applying for a grad scheme? There is not a huge difference if you're studying an academic subject. Law might edge it. However, history students don't have direct access to the legal profession which makes Law an infinitely better subject to study. It opens many doors. [I misread what you were asking. Yes, you can get your LPC course sponsored by some firms once you secure a training contract (a TC). You could also pay for it yourself as some firms don't sponsor your LPC, or you could also pay for it if you haven't got a TC secured in the hope of later getting a TC with a firm. The latter of which is a bit risky!]
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    (Original post by yabbayabba)
    You don't seem to know much about the actual practice of law. It's very hard to land a training contract these days as the amount of law graduates relative to training contract places is obscenely high. Plus many law firms hire non-law graduates too, adding extra competition. Without landing a training contract, no law student is going to be able to land a job as a lawyer.

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    You are missing out the other profession in that. Don't forget about barristers; they're people too.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    You are missing out the other profession in that. Don't forget about barristers; they're people too.
    Yeah true, but most lawyers are solicitors really.

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    I graduated in law last year. Around 75% of my cohort wanted to do law as a career at the start. That dropped to around 30% by the end. It's only anecdotal but the majority of people found it insufferably dull. Including me - I'm now a med student!

    I get that the degree and law practice is different (I'm a magistrate and also did the usual student law clinic, work experience placements etc. so have seen the practical side of law) but there is a lot of sitting behind a desk reading dull papers on subjects which are of no interest. I can understand becoming a barrister more because at least there's time spent in court, but it's incredibly long hours and difficult to get a post. And again the subjects can be dull - I imagine disputing tax or land law is no more interesting than reading about it.

    Some people love it though. And being a judge would be quite fun if it's anything like being a magistrate.
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    (Original post by am1992)
    I graduated in law last year. Around 75% of my cohort wanted to do law as a career at the start. That dropped to around 30% by the end. It's only anecdotal but the majority of people found it insufferably dull. Including me - I'm now a med student!

    I get that the degree and law practice is different (I'm a magistrate and also did the usual student law clinic, work experience placements etc. so have seen the practical side of law) but there is a lot of sitting behind a desk reading dull papers on subjects which are of no interest. I can understand becoming a barrister more because at least there's time spent in court, but it's incredibly long hours and difficult to get a post. And again the subjects can be dull - I imagine disputing tax or land law is no more interesting than reading about it.

    Some people love it though. And being a judge would be quite fun if it's anything like being a magistrate.
    At which university did you study, if you don't mind me asking?
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    I've only enjoyed law more as I've done my degree. The one thing I'd recommend is reading a case and asking yourself if you'd be happy reading a couple of thousand of those over the course of your degree.
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    We had a careers evening and a barrister told us that you can do a one year conversion course from another degree to law (i don't know how accurate that is) but maybe that would be worth looking into if you're worried as at least then you have your original degree as a back up as well as your law qualification?
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    You need to be realistic, OP. If you want a place at a good firm, you need to be better than the majority of law students. Are you? You also need to work on your CV -- just the degree alone won't get you anywhere. You need to have done other things and have a varied background to draw on to show an ability to work in a team, leadership, confidence, reliability, etc, as just a few examples of qualities firms might want to see in you. (If you might think of the bar, you need to show speaking and arguing ability -- mooting is important.)

    To work in law, the answer is yes, you will have to go to law school and take the LPC or BPTC.

    I think it's a great degree to do whether you go into practice or not. If you engage with the issues properly a lot of the content is very interesting. However, the average law student doesn't, really. It's not surprising that a lot of students find law very boring when all they're doing is memorising textbooks and repeating what they've read in exams. On the other hand, it can be an awful lot of work, and doing a non-law degree won't stop or even hinder your entry into law beyond delaying it for a year if you want to practise, so if there is another subject that interests you and you think you'd benefit from having a bit more space to engage in ECs etc at uni then that would also be a valid route. Ultimately if you want to study law academically it should be because you're interested in it academically.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    The one thing I'd recommend is reading a case and asking yourself if you'd be happy reading a couple of thousand of those over the course of your degree.
    People actually read cases (on a regular basis)?
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    (Original post by Law-Hopeful)
    People actually read cases (on a regular basis)?
    It took me a loooooong time to work out that there would only be 40-50 cases per module that reading the judgments would be worthwhile for, and I liked reading the others anyway.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    It took me a loooooong time to work out that there would only be 40-50 cases per module that reading the judgments would be worthwhile for, and I liked reading the others anyway.
    I can count the number of cases I read in my first year on one hand... Usually I just went with what the textbooks said the significance of the case was.
 
 
 

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