Why do people care so much about other people's beliefs? Watch

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sxckerpxnch
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A Christian can believe in Christianity. A Muslim can believe in Islam. A Hindu can believe in Hinduism. Etc. Why do people care so much about what others believe in? If they want to believe it then they can it's nothing to do with anyone else. Everyone has their own perception of their religion not everyone believes in the same things eg. sex before marriage for Christians or to wear a headscarf or not for Muslims.
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SnoochToTheBooch
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I care because of the damage the beliefs do.
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TornadoGR4
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Because people are so desperate to try & 'prove' that they're right. It's sad really.
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sxckerpxnch
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(Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
I care because of the damage the beliefs do.
Beliefs haven't caused any damage in my life or my friends' lives.
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sxckerpxnch
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(Original post by TornadoGR4)
Because people are so desperate to try & 'prove' that they're right. It's sad really.
It is :/ Everyone should be able to believe what they want
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SnoochToTheBooch
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(Original post by AtomicAJ)
Beliefs haven't caused any damage in my life or my friends' lives.
They haven't made them needlessly worry about burning in hell for eternity? Uncomfortable towards gayness, masturbation or any form of 'unsanctioned' sexual activity? Made promises with nothing to back them up? Made to think that superstition and blind faith is somehow virtuous? Filled their lives with pointless ritual and arbitrary rules? Conned them out of time and money? Made them have children they didn't want?
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sxckerpxnch
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(Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
They haven't made them needlessly worry about burning in hell for eternity? Uncomfortable towards gayness, masturbation or any form of 'unsanctioned' sexual activity? Made promises with nothing to back them up? Made to think that superstition and blind faith is somehow virtuous? Filled their lives with pointless ritual and arbitrary rules? Conned them out of time and money? Made them have children they didn't want?
Nope, just because our religions don't agree with it that doesn't mean we don't respect it. There's a lesbian girl in our class, we're still friends with her. If I'm raped I'd be allowed to have an abortion, otherwise I wouldn't be putting myself in such a situation to fall pregnant. Praying doesn't take up so much time for me lol depends on what you do I guess. Besides it hasn't ruined my life I still go out with my friends and do whatever You're probably thinking of extremely religious people. Even so, if they are happy with that then why is it any of your business?
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QE2
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(Original post by AtomicAJ)
A Christian can believe in Christianity. A Muslim can believe in Islam. A Hindu can believe in Hinduism. Etc. Why do people care so much about what others believe in? If they want to believe it then they can it's nothing to do with anyone else. Everyone has their own perception of their religion not everyone believes in the same things eg. sex before marriage for Christians or to wear a headscarf or not for Muslims.
Because people who insist that their version of primitive man's attempts to explain the world is the only way to think, attempt to impose those irrational and often dangerous beliefs on others, through family, education, law, violence, whatever. And while they try to do this, logical, rational people who care about what happens to other people (not just their own in-group), will continue to challenge the dangerous nonsense.

Everybody should be free to practice whatever religion they want (as long as it doesn't break any laws), but they do not have the right to insist that other people modify their behaviour to fit in with their particular brand of self-delusion.

Religion is like masturbation. It is not a problem if you keep it to yourself and do it in private, but to insist on showing everyone that you do it is plain weird. Trying to make others do it like you is just disturbing.
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sxckerpxnch
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(Original post by QE2)
Because people who insist that their version of primitive man's attempts to explain the world is the only way to think, attempt to impose those irrational and often dangerous beliefs on others, through family, education, law, violence, whatever. And while they try to do this, logical, rational people who care about what happens to other people (not just their own in-group), will continue to challenge the dangerous nonsense.

Everybody should be free to practice whatever religion they want (as long as it doesn't break any laws), but they do not have the right to insist that other people modify their behaviour to fit in with their particular brand of self-delusion.

Religion is like masturbation. It is not a problem if you keep it to yourself and do it in private, but to insist on showing everyone that you do it is plain weird. Trying to make others do it like you is just disturbing.
Yeah, as I said earlier everyone should believe what they want and keep it to themselves rather than commenting on other people's beliefs, deciding whether it's right or wrong
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Protégé
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I blame people more than religion. If people weren't stupid in the first place then religions with dangerous elements in them would have little effect, many people are weak and live inside of their own little bubble. That's why I find people who complain that religion is the source of all conflict extremely annoying, it simply isn't so. Religion is just another thing that exploits weakness and idiocy in people.
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SnoochToTheBooch
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(Original post by AtomicAJ)
Nope, just because our religions don't agree with it that doesn't mean we don't respect it. There's a lesbian girl in our class, we're still friends with her. If I'm raped I'd be allowed to have an abortion, otherwise I wouldn't be putting myself in such a situation to fall pregnant. Praying doesn't take up so much time for me lol depends on what you do I guess. Besides it hasn't ruined my life I still go out with my friends and do whatever You're probably thinking of extremely religious people. Even so, if they are happy with that then why is it any of your business?
No not extremely religious people. That is not an extreme case that I've described. That might not be true of your individual case but there are billions of people out there. I was brought up very exposed to Catholicism and I know exactly what it's about and how it operates. An extreme case would be the people out there bombing and beheading and crucifying people in 2015. Turning down medical treatments for their dying children in favour of faith healing. Impeding scientific progress. Removing young girls' clitorises(!!!!!). It might deserve some credit for frightening people into behaving themselves in the past (or in certain present day countries) but that doesn't get it off the hook. It has all of humanity's worst bits wrapped up into one package.

And it's my business to comment on that stuff because 1) why the hell not, every other topic is fair game, but more importantly 2) it must be doing some good for the internet to be full of this sort of discussion. If calling a spade a spade helps one person not get sucked in to that poisonous stuff or helps one person overcome childhood brainwashing then it's 100% worth it.
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StrangeBanana
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(Original post by QE2)
Religion is like masturbation. It is not a problem if you keep it to yourself and do it in private, but to insist on showing everyone that you do it is plain weird. Trying to make others do it like you is just disturbing.
Rubbish analogy, considering practising religion doesn't constitute an act of public indecency. If religious people expressing their beliefs (beliefs which are no less valid than yours, in the eyes of the law) in public makes you uncomfortable, that's entirely your problem.

It really is very close-minded of you to make the comparison.
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sxckerpxnch
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(Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
No not extremely religious people. That is not an extreme case that I've described. That might not be true of your individual case but there are billions of people out there. I was brought up very exposed to Catholicism and I know exactly what it's about and how it operates. An extreme case would be the people out there bombing and beheading and crucifying people in 2015. Turning down medical treatments for their dying children in favour of faith healing. Impeding scientific progress. Removing young girls' clitorises(!!!!!). It might deserve some credit for frightening people into behaving themselves in the past (or in certain present day countries) but that doesn't get it off the hook. It has all of humanity's worst bits wrapped up into one package.

And it's my business to comment on that stuff because 1) why the hell not, every other topic is fair game, but more importantly 2) it must be doing some good for the internet to be full of this sort of discussion. If calling a spade a spade helps one person not get sucked in to that poisonous stuff or helps one person overcome childhood brainwashing then it's 100% worth it.
Of course you can comment on it, why else would I have made this thread? I'm interested in hearing the opinions of people on this topic whether I agree with it or not. The removal of young girls' clitorises has nothing to do with religion... it is to do with culture. That occurs in west Africa (Nigeria etc.). People have different perceptions of their religions. Those in the Middle East bombing, beheading and crucifying are disgusting excuses for human beings, they believe their religion tells them to do this which isn't the case. In Islam, I'm pretty sure you are not allowed to kill someone, as in almost all religions I believe. The aim of this thread is to discuss religions not extremists, hence my point about how it isn't our business how someone chooses to live their lifestyle, as long as it is legal. Of course we should step in when lives are put at risk
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sxckerpxnch
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(Original post by Protégé)
I blame people more than religion. If people weren't stupid in the first place then religions with dangerous elements in them would have little effect, many people are weak and live inside of their own little bubble. That's why I find people who complain that religion is the source of all conflict extremely annoying, it simply isn't so. Religion is just another thing that exploits weakness and idiocy in people.
Yeah I agree, because the religious books were written so long ago with little to no editing they aren't very detailed so as a result people have different perceptions of what means what and to what extent a rule goes for example "An eye for an eye"
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SnoochToTheBooch
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(Original post by AtomicAJ)
Of course you can comment on it, why else would I have made this thread? I'm interested in hearing the opinions of people on this topic whether I agree with it or not. The removal of young girls' clitorises has nothing to do with religion... it is to do with culture. That occurs in west Africa (Nigeria etc.).
Pasted from the first result on a google search about why FGM is done. First one (indirectly) and last one are both religion-related:

"Why is it practiced?

There are several reasons provided to justify the practice of female genital mutilation:

Control over women’s sexuality: Virginity is a pre-requisite for marriage and is equated to female honour in a lot of communities. FGM, in particular infibulation, is defended in this context as it is assumed to reduce a woman’s sexual desire and lessen temptations to have extramarital sex thereby preserving a girl’s virginity.

Hygiene: There is a belief that female genitalia are unsightly and dirty. In some FGM-practicing societies, unmutilated women are regarded as unclean and are not allowed to handle food and water.

Gender based factors: FGM is often deemed necessary in order for a girl to be considered a complete woman, and the practice marks the divergence of the sexes in terms of their future roles in life and marriage. The removal of the clitoris and labia — viewed by some as the “male parts” of a woman’s body — is thought to enhance the girl’s femininity, often synonymous with docility and obedience. It is possible that the trauma of mutilation may have this effect on a girl’s personality. If mutilation is part of an initiation rite, then it is accompanied by explicit teaching about the woman’s role in her society.

Cultural identity: In certain communities, where mutilation is carried out as part of the initiation into adulthood, FGM defines who belongs to the community. In such communities, a girl cannot be considered an adult in a FGM-practicing society unless she has undergone FGM.

Religion: FGM predates Islam and is not practiced by the majority of Muslims, but it has acquired a religious dimension. Where it is practiced by Muslims, religion is frequently cited as a reason. Many of those who oppose mutilation deny that there is any link between the practice and religion, but Islamic leaders are not unanimous on the subject. Although predominant among Muslims, FGM also occurs among Christians, animists and Jews."

(Original post by AtomicAJ)
People have different perceptions of their religions. Those in the Middle East bombing, beheading and crucifying are disgusting excuses for human beings, they believe their religion tells them to do this which isn't the case. In Islam, I'm pretty sure you are not allowed to kill someone, as in almost all religions I believe. The aim of this thread is to discuss religions not extremists, hence my point about how it isn't our business how someone chooses to live their lifestyle, as long as it is legal. Of course we should step in when lives are put at risk
Actually at first I deliberately just stuck to the standard stuff and left the extremist stuff out until 'extreme beliefs' got brought into it. I didn't need to go there but it's not like it's not worth mentioning either. The original point of this thread was you questioning why people care about others' beliefs so much and saying they were nothing to do with anyone else. I've given a definitely incomplete list of perfectly common damaging beliefs/attitudes that many religions unquestionably promote and cause countless people to live by. In a world that everyone else has to share with them. Never mind that it's based on nothing but a few ancient books written in an age of stupidity. It can't be hard to at least understand where the all the irritation and anger towards it comes from.
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QE2
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(Original post by StrangeBanana)
Rubbish analogy, considering practising religion doesn't constitute an act of public indecency. If religious people expressing their beliefs (beliefs which are no less valid than yours, in the eyes of the law) in public makes you uncomfortable, that's entirely your problem.

It really is very close-minded of you to make the comparison.
An analogy isn't "X is the same thing as Y". Here, this might help.

Those who insist on forcing on others, what should be a personal and private thing is both weird and disturbing.
Why do religionists not only think that everyone needs to know what they are doing, but also expect society to give them special consideration, merely because they are doing it?
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QE2
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(Original post by AtomicAJ)
The removal of young girls' clitorises has nothing to do with religion... it is to do with culture. That occurs in west Africa (Nigeria etc.).
If FGM is a purely African cultural practice that has nothing to do with religion, how do you explain its high incidence in Indonesia? In some areas it is as high as 80%, yet there was no cultural history of it and it was not practiced until after the arrival of Islam in the 13th century. Only recently, the MUI (Indonesia's top Muslim organisation) has stated that FGM is "morally recommended".

To claim that it has nothing to do with religion is simply denying the facts of reality.

In Islam, I'm pretty sure you are not allowed to kill someone, as in almost all religions I believe.
Islam is remarkable for its many guidelines on who may and should be killed, including some rather gruesome descriptions.

The aim of this thread is to discuss religions not extremists
But the two are inextricably linked. It would be like trying to discuss sport without including footballers.
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quantum gravity
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I hope everybody respects my religious belief that in a ideal Islamic state, 'apostates, homosexuals, and critics/blasphemous people are executed' which includes the OP as I believe he has made some blasphemous comments that may either be dealt with execution or some cruel and abhorrent punishment. I also believe non Muslims should be discriminated and subdued, humiliated and humbled by being degraded as either dhimmis paying jizya and karaj tax or slaves if they fight/struggle against us.

Please respect my beliefs and "don't care so much about my beliefs" (which one day will be implemented across the world)
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quantum gravity
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Afaik FGM or as we like to call it "female circumcision" is legal in the four schools of Islamic Sunni thought and there has never been historically a firm ban against FGM/female circumcision until modern times by some westernized scholarz.
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sxckerpxnch
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[QUOTE=QE2;57295847]If FGM is a purely African cultural practice that has nothing to do with religion, how do you explain its high incidence in Indonesia? In some areas it is as high as 80%, yet there was no cultural history of it and it was not practiced until after the arrival of Islam in the 13th century. Only recently, the MUI (Indonesia's top Muslim organisation) has stated that FGM is "morally recommended".


I didn't say it is a purely African cultural practice, that was an example -.-
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