Medicine and University Watch

RagaZ
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#1
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Why is it that most medical schools in the UK tend to isolate themselves from the rest of the university. For example at King's College London, there is Kings and then their is GKT King's College London. Each with different societies and sports teams.
I hear this is similar for other universities too.
So basically why do they do this? Does this make it harder to integrate with students on different course?
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Matriix
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I believe its because medical students usually have different timetables compared to other students (e.g. exams at different times of the year) which would make it hard for medical students to be part of societies/teams that are part of the main university as they may organise events when they don't have exams but the med students do.

I don't think it's exactly harder to integrate with students on different courses - you may just have to restrict yourself from going out with them when you have exams
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Cryinglightning
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It just sort of happens naturally because medics tend to be more busy so don't always have time for committing to a general uni sports team, hence why there are specific medic sports teams so that they fit in with timetables. Also a lot of non medics tend to get a bit *****y about medics because as a general rule, medics are cliquey. We have our own sports team and societies and there isn't much time or opportunity for meeting non medics except the people you live with in halls. Also at Leicester we get pink ID badge holders instead of the standard clear ones and that makes us stand out more.. (sounds weird but it's true)
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RagaZ
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Hmm this seems far more counter intuitive to be honest. Imo it adds to the delusion of superiority med students have. This whole them vs us mentality thats being installed. I dont know tho, lets see how it goes when (if) i start this September !

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*pitseleh*
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My own experience is that it was easier to integrate with people doing other subjects when I was doing my English degree than it has been doing Medicine. But that might easily be explained by the fact that I've been to two different universities, and/or the fact that I lived in college for two out of three years during my first degree, whereas I didn't live in halls even in my first year of Medicine, so didn't get the chance to meet as many non-medics. I do know a few medics who make a conscious effort to keep their social group as non-medical as possible, so it can be done - but I think it's something they have to work at, whereas it's easy to slip into socialising only with medics.

I think the first poster is right about the reasons for med schools being slightly separate from the rest of the university, by the way. We run on a different timetable to almost everyone else, and the style of the course is also not really replicated in other subjects. Oh, and our lecturers are usually clinical staff, so it pays to have lecture theatres that are located with the hospitals - rather than the main university site - in mind; that might also contribute to the separation, too.
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Democracy
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(Original post by RagaZ)
Why is it that most medical schools in the UK tend to isolate themselves from the rest of the university. For example at King's College London, there is Kings and then their is GKT King's College London.
Very often the medical school was founded way before the rest of the university.

GKT came before KCL and for most of their history they were separate institutions only sharing the University of London as a common degree awarding body. In the 1980s and 1990s, all the London med schools were forced to join larger universities, but historically they were all separate.

Each with different societies and sports teams.
I hear this is similar for other universities too.
As others have pointed out, this is because medical schools normally run to a very different academic calendar compared to the rest of the uni. While the rest of the university (and by extension, the student's union and its clubs and socs) go on holiday for the summer in June, we carry on working til August. And during term time, other undergrads get Wednesday afternoons off for sports etc, but medics don't - hence the need for our own societies which fit in with our unique timetables.

It has nothing to do with snobbery - it is just the most practical way of getting things done. Our course is very different to a typical undergraduate degree.

(Original post by RagaZ)
Hmm this seems far more counter intuitive to be honest. Imo it adds to the delusion of superiority med students have. This whole them vs us mentality thats being installed. I dont know tho, lets see how it goes when (if) i start this September !

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You betray an alarming lack of understanding for someone who's apparently a future med student :confused:
:confusing:
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TooSexyForMyStethoscope
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(Original post by RagaZ)
Hmm this seems far more counter intuitive to be honest. Imo it adds to the delusion of superiority med students have. This whole them vs us mentality thats being installed. I dont know tho, lets see how it goes when (if) i start this September !

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Geography has a part to play as well. Many institutions in the UK have their medical school buildings located in the vicinity of the largest hospital. This is often a considerable distance from the main campus of the university.

As a consequence, most medical students will have their accommodation further from the main campus and closer to the medical school.
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