jackratty
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I'm doing an EPQ and am aiming to centre it around an astrophysics based question but I don't know what. I have had 2 ideas so far these being "is the cost of lunar telescopes worth the discoveries that they make?" and "what happens when time stops?" but both of these are proving pretty hard to research and write about. All ideas would be welcome.
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TSR Jessica
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Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you’ve posted in the right place? Posting in the specific Study Help forum should help get responses.

I'm going to quote in Puddles the Monkey now so she can move your thread to the right place if it's needed. :yy:

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Ki Yung Na
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(Original post by jackratty)
I'm doing an EPQ and am aiming to centre it around an astrophysics based question but I don't know what. I have had 2 ideas so far these being "is the cost of lunar telescopes worth the discoveries that they make?" and "what happens when time stops?" but both of these are proving pretty hard to research and write about. All ideas would be welcome.
Hopefully some of these ideas help, here we go:


Something to do with nuclear fusion like for example how it can be used for Earth's energy needs.

Something about plasma research or significance like for example how the universe at one point was said to be a plasmic state according to the big bang.

Star life cycles, there's plenty involved here in terms of physics which is accessible!

Different models of the universe

Is there extra-terrestrial life?

Distances, measurements and other astronomy techniques and methods for various thing like spectroscopy for star composition, parralax for distances and observation of rotational velocity amongst others things to compare neighbour structures to deduce information about black holes, dark matter and dark energy - or at least the potential for it.

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mik1a
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The search for exoplanets: how to find them, how they are classified, what the consequences are for us. It doesn't require a lot of hard maths, but it is interesting and is a very fast-moving research area. I would strongly recommend that.
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Joinedup
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Astrobiology is an interesting area, a few years ago you'd have been accused of being a speculative science fiction fanatic but it's legit nowadays - draws in astrophysics, geophysics biology and chemistry. I was listening to an interesting radio programme about it just today http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05zl3v2

or maybe something about the SKA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkR6LAOgSII The technique of interferometry used by radio astronomers is conceptually just a little beyond A level material & you should probably be able to make something of it.
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Helsy
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(Original post by jackratty)
I'm doing an EPQ and am aiming to centre it around an astrophysics based question but I don't know what. I have had 2 ideas so far these being "is the cost of lunar telescopes worth the discoveries that they make?" and "what happens when time stops?" but both of these are proving pretty hard to research and write about. All ideas would be welcome.
I did an EPQ on an astronomy topic (about 4 years ago now!) and I measured Jupiter's mass by measuring the positions of the Galilean moons over a long period of time. But I did that using a well known education simulator, so didn't need any expensive equipment and clear skies.

I think the biggest question is whether you want it to be at all experimental or if you just want to research a concept. Both are good options, and many of those people have mentioned are great for researching about. (In particular the exoplanet one but then I might be a bit biased towards that!) The advantage with a research topic is that you can take time to learn the physics, some of which can be a bit mind boggling. But experimental can be fun too! And needn't be complicated. There's also tons of people out there who'll love to help - academics at your local university, the Royal Astronomical Society, a local amateur astronomical society.

Have you tried chatting to your/a Physics teacher?

If you want any detailed help, just PM me.
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