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Is There More Than One Way To Become A Doctor? watch

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    seems a stupid question huh.

    what I mean to say is, would it be wise to do a 3-year course in, say, physiological sciences instead of going straight into medicine after a-levels? lots of people say that what you learn in physsci is almost exactly the same as what you learn in pre-clinical medicine, so shouldn't it be quite easy to change subjects after 3 years?

    i'm thinking of doing this cos i want to become an organ scholar as well, and having to both study med and lead a choir would be hell. that's why I'm looking for a 'lighter' subject to study for my first 3 years at uni.

    i know it's kinda tough to understand my situation, but any helpful comments would be greatly appreciated.
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    mace
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    I know this guy, Sam, he's an organ scholar and he's studying Med. at Oxford. If he can handle it, you shall too.
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    thanks, noodle this sam guy must be really good, managing to do both at the same time! i'll try to contact him through the university, but please tell me if there's an easier way, i.e. an email address?
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    Mace
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    Hi Mace, I sent you a private message.
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    i got it, cheers!

    tell us a bit about yourself. are you a student of some kind?
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    Mace
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    hi,

    Im doing medicine this year (a Level grades permitting of course!)

    IT is becoming increasingly common for people to do degrees before they do medicine - and it gives u more experience. I would probbaly do it if given the chance, and i agree on you doing it because the medical degree is very time consuming ( we are talking about 3o+ hours of lectures a wekk, excluding homework etc).

    If you want any help just PM me
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    You can definately convert to surgery after a biochemistry degree or something similar, but don't know about converting to medicine. All you need is research into what's available, perseverance and a little bit of luck, depending on exactly what you want to do. E.g. your uni might let you convert after 3rd year, or may need for vacancies to arise first, etc.

    I know people say medicine is a lot of work, but I reckon if you can handle A-levels + your music stuff, you can handle, comfortably medicine + your music stuff, because the amount of work isnt much different. Assuming you did your A-levels well that is .
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    many thanks to both of you for the advice.

    me only worry is that having 'organ scholarship' on my application form will reduce my chances of getting a place, since you need to have real evidence to show that you can cope with both. someone told me that if i really wanted to do medicine i should make that my first priority and not let anything else get in the way. what do you think?

    btw, i've just finished my gcses so i've still got a long way to go! i just need to sort this thing out before i go on holiday.
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    Mace
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    no way!!
    It will STRENGTHEN your application i promise you!
    It shows you have outside interests which is what you need!

    Do you know where you might want to apply?

    If you want help with your personal statment in a yearor so just contact me i got all 4 offers from Leeds Sheffield Manchester and NEwcastle!

    Im hopefully off to Newcastle which is known as one of the best medical schools.


    Originally posted by iluvthesun
    many thanks to both of you for the advice.

    me only worry is that having 'organ scholarship' on my application form will reduce my chances of getting a place, since you need to have real evidence to show that you can cope with both. someone told me that if i really wanted to do medicine i should make that my first priority and not let anything else get in the way. what do you think?

    btw, i've just finished my gcses so i've still got a long way to go! i just need to sort this thing out before i go on holiday.
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    Mace
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    cool!! you'll help me with my personal statement?!! that's something i'm quite worried actually. i won't know where to start.

    as for universities, i'm thinking of applying to newcastle, southhampton, bristol, oxford and cambridge (organ scholars get to apply to both, lucky us). i've heard from everyone that newcastle is very good. good luck with your a-level results!
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    Mace
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    yeah no problem when i find my Personal Statement i will send it to you to show what it has to contain.
    Start getting some voluntary once a week experience now if you can. It doesnt matter if you cant i left it quite late but still got the offers.

    remember you can only pick 4 places, you have picked some very good places there but just thought id tell you Southhampton dont interview candidates so if u dont like interviews (some people dont) it could be worth applying there. Edinburgh also dont interview and they are good too.
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    Yeh, whoever told you you need to sort out your priorities I don't think understands the situation. You can't go around doing everything in your life one way, giving up your other interests and hobbies just to pursue one goal when the goals aren't mutually exclusive. I think it could indeed (depending on your perspective) be harmful were you to give up organ scholarship to do medicine; you would be changing who you are for no good reason and decreasing your well roundedness (and uniqueness) as a person.

    People spend too long stressing how hard A-levels, uni or medicine are and too little time just doing them. If a uni doesnt want you because you have other significant interests other than medicine then that shows negatively for them rather than for you. It's not impossible to do 2 demanding things at once, just takes dedication. If you enjoy and are interested in the things, then it's no real work at all! I'd advise you ignore all the "you can't do medicine and something else at same time/ you need to sort out your priorities" statements provided you have determination, interest and focus!

    I myself am (hopefully) going to cambridge at the end of the year to do medicine, altho I wasn't quite as successful in that only got 2/4 uni offers from manchester and cambridge so dunno if I'll be any help with personal statement. But anyway, you've got someone else willing to help and a long way to go.

    What's an organ scholarship by the way as I have next to no idea!
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    an organ scholarship is where the university selects you as a scholar to donate your organs for scientific experiments... nah , it means you get to lead a college choir and play the organ for services and that all that stuff. plus you get a couple of hundred quid and a huge room with grand piano. organ scholars at some colleges have heavier duties than others. some have like two services a week while others have one every day, morning and evening sometimes.

    you two must be really proud of yourselves, getting into medical schools, nevermind two of the best in the country! what a-levels did u do? what were your interviews like? what a-level offers did you get? i don't really like interviews myself but i think it's still good to have them cos it gives you experience for stuff like job interviews later on in life. what are you thinking of doing after med school? hospital, gp, or maybe research?
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    Mace
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    I did Biology, Chem, Maths and General Studies.

    My interviews were much easier than other peoples reported theirs to be - they were like friendly chats and making them laugh seemed to work.

    My offrers were:
    MAnchester, Leeds and NEwcastle: AAB (excluding general studies)
    Sheffield: ABB (including general studies).

    Try not to worry about interviews they aint that bad as long as you come across as friendly and confident you are fine!

    I will probably do A&E or orthaepaedics not sure yet - we have aages to decide though so dont worry if you dont know yourself!
    Good luck

    Matt
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    Ah, I see, first explanation would be more interesting though .

    Well, everyone I know of who applied to do medicine (about 6/7) got offers from unis, many getting all 4 offers. Most if not all should make the grades. I was more of the exception only getting 2 offers.

    I did Biology, Chemistry, Further Maths & Maths. Interviews were straightforward enough, most friendly, only 1 of the cambridge ones was a bit less friendly but friendly nonetheless (if you know what I mean).

    I think after med school, I'll do another degree in something else, maybe maths/computer science or anything interesting with good job prospects. Then don't know what I'll do then.
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    I'm in more or less the same position as you iluvthesun, because I thought I wanted to do medicine, but when I realised it was such a tough and long course, I thought I'd go for something with a basis with which i could perhaps switch to medicine at some stage (short course to medicine.. *prays*). I still don't know if it is possible, but all my teachers have told me that once you're actually in uni, its very easy to switch courses, especially if they are closely related. On a rather more pessamistic note though, from my research, it appears that medicine is quite specialised from the other sciences...and therefore is not as straightforward to join such a course midway. I dont knooooow but I'm still praying there is a possibility of a short course 2 medicine!!
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    If you do Physiology at uni, you share most of your lectures with the Medical students. Speaking from an Oxford point of view (I know that system best because I have a place to read Physiology there, and know lots of Physiology and Medicine people there), in the first year the only significant difference between Phys and Med students is that the Med students have lectures in something like "Medicine in Society" where they learn about the history of Medicine, a bit of sociology and how to talk to patients. They also go to a GP's surgery once a week. Apart from that, you learn more or less the same stuff.

    A common route for people who want to be doctors but, for whatever reason don't get into Medical school the first time round is to do something like Pharmacy, Chemistry, Biochemistry or even Biomedical Sciences at first, then apply for Medicine having finished their first degree. Many of my friends who have applied and got places to read Medicine put down Pharmacy as an insurance choice.

    As a side note, if you do choose to do Physiology at uni, read the syllabus for each uni carefully, because Physiology means different things at different places. At some unis, it is very general, with some zoology thrown in as well, or with heavier emphasis on Biochemistry. At other places, such as Oxford, Physiological Sciences (note the different name) is practically (and I quote from an Oxford Physiology student) "a bit like a slacker medical course".

    Hope this helps, and good luck!
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    I don't know if this has already been said or if it's even helpful, but there are some places in the country where you can study to become a doctor even without the relevent degrees or A levels...they "bridge the gap" if you like, for arty students, etc. who've had a different path all their life and then want to become doctors.
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    Thanks for the brilliant inside info, Grapefruit Lady. Now I know just how similar Medicine and Physiology are! Well done for getting into Oxford. I guess you'll be in your first year? Tell us how you get on.

    (Original post by Adhsur)
    there are some places in the country where you can study to become a doctor even without the relevent degrees or A levels...they "bridge the gap" if you like, for arty students, etc. who've had a different path all their life and then want to become doctors.
    Adhsur. I've heard of those, but I've also heard that it would be a pretty desperate situation if it came to that! The chances of getting into med school then would be much smaller. Thanks for the comment, though.

    Meanwhile, it's GCSE results...
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    Mace, having great fun in Hong Kong (browsing through online forums)

    Hi! i just discovered this forum and it looks really good. i am hoping to apply for med this october (and am seriously considering oxford) - i am stuck on what to include in my pers statement and dont really know where to start! Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated.....
 
 
 
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