Garethwannabeeng
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excuse me if I havent posted in the right place, I am new to this forum.

I have applied for Electrical Engineering and Chemical engineering courses at a few different unis.

I am living in Hull, but want to move out to London which is the reason I applied to London unis.

my A-levels werent great, so I had to apply at either low ranking unis or good unis with a foundation year.

I have applied to these places:

Hull - chem eng (foundation)
London South bank - chem eng (straight entry)
Queens mary - Electrical eng (foundation)
Westminister - Electrical eng (straight entry)
Hull - Physics ( foundation)

I am living in Hull, but want to move out to London which is the reason I applied to London unis.

My mind seems to be set on doing chemical eng, so I am considering London south bank but I heard its a bad university?

Please help
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Garethwannabeeng
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If it's too long here is my short form :


Want to study Chemical Eng. but didn't achieve good grades.

Choice between Hull (which includes a foundation yr) and London South Bank (which is direct entry) .

Is the extra year worth it to study at Hull as I have heard that lsbu is not good?

Cheers
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Garethwannabeeng
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If there are any moderators here who could check if my post is in the right place , thank you .
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chank062
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I would say take a foundation year because even if it isn't for the slightly better university, it will give you a much better knowledge base for the degree and it could help you gain a much better degree overall

I can't speak from experience but god luck man
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Garethwannabeeng
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(Original post by chank062)
I would say take a foundation year because even if it isn't for the slightly better university, it will give you a much better knowledge base for the degree and it could help you gain a much better degree overall

I can't speak from experience but god luck man
Cheers for the answer , will the foundation yr look bad to employers and is it a replacement to a levels or supplementary to it ?
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username829839
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If I was in your shoes I would probably do a foundation year, as it would help improve where you went wrong in your a levels. Also it would give you experience on how things are graded at university.

I know a few people on my course that did a foundation year after getting 'bad' a levels, and they thought it was better for them than to jump straight into a degree.
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11ahn
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I do Mechanical & Medical Engineering at Hull at the moment and I like it - should be improving next year too as some of the lecturers are changing. The Chem Eng's share 3/4 first year modules with Mech, Electronic & Med Engs - first year at least is good! Can't comment on 2nd year as Chem Eng's only have maths with us Hope that helps!
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cuckoo99
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Foundation every time ! Gives you a chance to refresh/catch up on some basics while giving you an opportunity to get into a decent uni, it's win win apart from the extra year of loans but most people end up using there 4 years max of loans anyway nowadays. My friend is currently doing foundation physics at Sussex and he really enjoyed it.
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Garethwannabeeng
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(Original post by Lostox)
If I was in your shoes I would probably do a foundation year, as it would help improve where you went wrong in your a levels. Also it would give you experience on how things are graded at university.

I know a few people on my course that did a foundation year after getting 'bad' a levels, and they thought it was better for them than to jump straight into a degree.

(Original post by cuckoo99)
Foundation every time ! Gives you a chance to refresh/catch up on some basics while giving you an opportunity to get into a decent uni, it's win win apart from the extra year of loans but most people end up using there 4 years max of loans anyway nowadays. My friend is currently doing foundation physics at Sussex and he really enjoyed it.
is there anything I should be aware of when taking foundation year, that I may be unaware of? And if I was to choose one uni for chem eng and one for elec eng, which do you think are the ones to choose?
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thebearissquare
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(Original post by cuckoo99)
Foundation every time ! Gives you a chance to refresh/catch up on some basics while giving you an opportunity to get into a decent uni, it's win win apart from the extra year of loans but most people end up using there 4 years max of loans anyway nowadays. My friend is currently doing foundation physics at Sussex and he really enjoyed it.
So if you do the foundation year you'll have to pay the last year if you want to get a masters?
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username853993
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(Original post by thebearissquare)
So if you do the foundation year you'll have to pay the last year if you want to get a masters?
Nope, as long as it is an integrated foundation year and integrated undergrad masters year you get funding for the entire length of your course (ie in a undergrad masters case + foundation year 5 years funding)

example

I did my foundation year at leeds last year and I am now doing the 4 year mphys physics degree now and get funding for all 5 years of my course as it is all classed as one course
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cuckoo99
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(Original post by Garethwannabeeng)
is there anything I should be aware of when taking foundation year, that I may be unaware of? And if I was to choose one uni for chem eng and one for elec eng, which do you think are the ones to choose?
Be aware that you will have to work a lot harder in your foundation year compared to your first year, I know it sounds weird but they will want you to prove yourself as the unis are basically taking a gamble by doing foundation years. This is reflected in the higher percentage needed to pass the foundation year- believe it's 60 percent but could be higher I think.

Good luck with your endeavours
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hs1var19
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LSBU is accredited by the IChemE but Hull isn't. But then again you have Bradford nearby that does the Chem Eng foundation for 200 pts.
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