Fare Evasion Please Help

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username1423899
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Hi

Earlier today I made a grave error of judgement. I lied about my travel journey in order to try to blag a cheaper ticket and was caught by a Revenue Protection Officer. Upon realising I wasn't going to get away with it I confessed everything and fully complied with all his questions. He took down some personal details and told me I'd be receiving a letter in 3-4 weeks. I've been looking up the consequences of this and I could be prosecuted with a criminal record and pay up to £1000. THIS WILL RUIN MY LIFE
Is there anybody who has experienced this that could give me some advice, kind of freaking out, it was so out of character, and i apologised in my 'interview'. How likely it is that I'll be prosecuted? This is so out of character for me, I just thought considering it was the start of summer and I was free that I'd be able to get away with it. I'm basically freaking out at the moment.
Should I send them a grovelling email/phone call? I would do literally anything to avoid a criminal record, I hope to go to uni in September and this could get my kicked out before I've even started. I have never done this kind of thing before and I need some advice

TL;DR Evasion letter coming, stupid mistake, life ruined, freak out, any experience PLEASE HELP
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uniqsummer
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Ok firstly this will not ruin your life. In the eyes of the law this is considered to be pretty low down on the offence list. Also your university is really not going to care, and there are very strict guidelines in place that prevent them from kicking you out over something like this.

The first thing you will need to do is wait for the letter that will come. This is the most difficult bit as you will be in limbo. Do NOT contact them before the letter is processed.

Read the letter carefully, normally they will require you to reply within a set number of days - if this is a first time offence it is typically in the interest of both parties to settle out of court (because that costs time and money)
Your reply to the letter should be apologetic, honest, and also offer an element of respect for the train company - so for example offer to pay for their administration costs currently incurred with processing and sending you the letter.

and then you have to see what they say. If you have done this several times and been caught then you will likely go to court, but for a first time, grovel and it should be all ok but prepare to pay some sort of penalty fee.
You may be asked to attend a second interview - in this case, same as above apologise, dress smart, offer to pay reasonable expenses.
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rockrunride
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(Original post by leemer)
Hi

Earlier today I made a grave error of judgement. I lied about my travel journey in order to try to blag a cheaper ticket and was caught by a Revenue Protection Officer. Upon realising I wasn't going to get away with it I confessed everything and fully complied with all his questions. He took down some personal details and told me I'd be receiving a letter in 3-4 weeks. I've been looking up the consequences of this and I could be prosecuted with a criminal record and pay up to £1000. THIS WILL RUIN MY LIFE
Is there anybody who has experienced this that could give me some advice, kind of freaking out, it was so out of character, and i apologised in my 'interview'. How likely it is that I'll be prosecuted? This is so out of character for me, I just thought considering it was the start of summer and I was free that I'd be able to get away with it. I'm basically freaking out at the moment.
Should I send them a grovelling email/phone call? I would do literally anything to avoid a criminal record, I hope to go to uni in September and this could get my kicked out before I've even started. I have never done this kind of thing before and I need some advice

TL;DR Evasion letter coming, stupid mistake, life ruined, freak out, any experience PLEASE HELP
Rail fare evasion is not a crime. If you were travelling in a Penalty Fare area (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penalty_fare) the most you will be asked to pay is £50 our four times the single fare to the next station from where you were caught. Usually there is a discount for paying up quickly. Penalty Fares are not fines.

I'd recommend you pay when you receive the letter, but again it's not a criminal offence - the company has to sue you to recover the money if you don't pay up.
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username1423899
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(Original post by rockrunride)
Rail fare evasion is not a crime. If you were travelling in a Penalty Fare area (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penalty_fare) the most you will be asked to pay is £50 our four times the single fare to the next station from where you were caught. Usually there is a discount for paying up quickly. Penalty Fares are not fines.

I'd recommend you pay when you receive the letter, but again it's not a criminal offence - the company has to sue you to recover the money if you don't pay up.

But it's deliberate Fare Evasion (different from penalty fares) in breach of the Regulations of Railways Act 1889

It is a criminal offence although I find it odd how not having a ticket at all on the train will only give you a penalty fare whereas buying a ticket, albeit a cheaper one could lead to me being persecuted

Hopefully I'll just be able to pay a settlement. Has this happened to you as I was hoping to get some advice from somebody who has also experienced this?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fare_evasion
https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/co...paying-a-fare/
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Jaknak
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(Original post by leemer)
But it's deliberate Fare Evasion (different from penalty fares) in breach of the Regulations of Railways Act 1889

It is a criminal offence although I find it odd how not having a ticket at all on the train will only give you a penalty fare whereas buying a ticket, albeit a cheaper one could lead to me being persecuted

Hopefully I'll just be able to pay a settlement. Has this happened to you as I was hoping to get some advice from somebody who has also experienced this?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fare_evasion
https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/co...paying-a-fare/
What happened ultimately?
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Ambitious1999
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(Original post by leemer)
But it's deliberate Fare Evasion (different from penalty fares) in breach of the Regulations of Railways Act 1889

It is a criminal offence although I find it odd how not having a ticket at all on the train will only give you a penalty fare whereas buying a ticket, albeit a cheaper one could lead to me being persecuted

Hopefully I'll just be able to pay a settlement. Has this happened to you as I was hoping to get some advice from somebody who has also experienced this?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fare_evasion
https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/co...paying-a-fare/
You could think of train fare evasion deliberate or not as being no worse than not paying to park in a pay and display car park. It's basically failing to pay for a service when requested to do so.

However parking fines are treat as civil offences councils don't have the power to use criminal courts they can use county courts get bailiffs etc. However Railways have far more powers than local councils etc do, for instance they are the only civil body to have its own police force. As a result rail companies can treat this as a criminal offence if you fail to pay the fine. They are a law onto themselves or state within a state. Why they have those powers I don't know but they just do.

So basically failing to pay £10 for 8 hrs parking will result in a fine of £25 to £45 enforced by civil courts for failure to pay.
Fail to pay a £2.50 train fare will result in a fine enforced with risk of a criminal record, magistrates court possible prision sentence etc.

Part of the reason is that train firms are failing to catch fare dodgers because people aren't fare dodging anymore as most stations now have barriers meaning they can't even get on a train without a ticket, so many Revenue protection officers are on targets to nit pick, just simply walking through first class will result in a penalty fare and or notice of criminal prosecution. Also rail companies are desperate for money.
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snapeyshady
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Ur a fool. When the officer asked for your name & address always lie. Make up a postcode/address & some random name.

I always do this & haven’t been caught
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Sh_A
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(Original post by snapeyshady)
Ur a fool. When the officer asked for your name & address always lie. Make up a postcode/address & some random name.

I always do this & haven’t been caught
You’re about 4 years late. :rolleyes:
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