Can you become a doctor with biomedical science? Watch

katy456
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Or do something in the medical profession?
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spiritless98
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You can go on to do graduate entry medicine if you get 2.1 or a 1st
Some universities accept 2.2s

Other medical professions are clinical scientist which requires three years of training
There's a lot more too


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katy456
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(Original post by spiritless98)
You can go on to do graduate entry medicine if you get 2.1 or a 1st
Some universities accept 2.2s

Other medical professions are clinical scientist which requires three years of training
There's a lot more too


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What if I didnt have a level chemistry? I don't need it for biomed but will it stop me from doing medicine in the future?
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German123
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You need biology and chemistry to be a doctor, I don't know if anything other than these two will get you there, that's what I have heard.
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bittr n swt
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No you study medicine...
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spiritless98
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(Original post by katy456)
What if I didnt have a level chemistry? I don't need it for biomed but will it stop me from doing medicine in the future?
It depends entirely on which universities you want to apply to
For eg Warwick and Nottingham don't look at A levels
They look at degree classification
Personal statement
And how well you did on UKCAT or GAMSAT


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nobodycarescarla
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At Queen Mary, top 15 from biomedical degree are guaranteed a place at Barts and The London Medical schoolName:  20150628_202705.jpg
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Size:  463.8 KB (5year course). Alot of people put it as their back up to medicine!
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Brownclown
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(Original post by nobodycarescarla;[url="tel:57410407")
57410407[/url]]At Queen Mary, top 15 from biomedical degree are guaranteed a place at Barts and The London Medical schoolName:  20150628_202705.jpg
Views: 2249
Size:  463.8 KB (5year course). Alot of people put it as their back up to medicine!
Is that not the standard 5 year course though and not the 4yr GEM? In which case OP would be screwed when it comes to funding
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HAnwar
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(Original post by nobodycarescarla)
At Queen Mary, top 15 from biomedical degree are guaranteed a place at Barts and The London Medical schoolName:  20150628_202705.jpg
Views: 2249
Size:  463.8 KB (5year course). Alot of people put it as their back up to medicine!
How about for BioChemistry?

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nobodycarescarla
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(Original post by Brownclown)
Is that not the standard 5 year course though and not the 4yr GEM? In which case OP would be screwed when it comes to funding
Yes unfortunately its the full 5 years, so unless you can find funding- it will be terribly difficult to get through
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Brownclown
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(Original post by nobodycarescarla;[url="tel:57410687")
57410687[/url]]Yes unfortunately its the full 5 years, so unless you can find funding- it will be terribly difficult to get through
Yh that's what I thought. If they wanted a transfer then they should apply to biomed at leicester and medical sciences at exeter which allow direct transfer to yr 1 medicine if you get a high 2:1 in your first year. Newcastle also do this but only allow 3/300 students to transfer so it's nearly impossible statistically

Could also apply to warwick - again top students are guaranteed an interview for the GEM course once they finish their biomed degree
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CharlotteF1993
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what are the differences between a biomedical scientist and a clinical scientist and what routes do you do to get from being a biomedical scientist to a clinical scientist? I ask as I am studying a biomedical science degree.
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dapthegreat
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(Original post by spiritless98)
You can go on to do graduate entry medicine if you get 2.1 or a 1st
Some universities accept 2.2s

Other medical professions are clinical scientist which requires three years of training
There's a lot more too


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Agree with this.
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Brachioradialis
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Lots of misinformation in this thread. I'm a biomedical scientist and just got an offer for Warwick to do graduate-entry medicine.

You do not need to have A-levels in any particular subjects. You don't even necessarily need A-levels at all, so long as you find another way onto a Bachelor's degree. If you do a biological or biochemistry related degree, you will have more options in terms of where you can apply. However, the main factor that decides where you can apply is whether you're willing to learn A-level chemistry and biology prior to getting in.

If you haven't got a biological background and don't want to learn it prior to applying, you have limited options. Warwick will accept Arts graduates with no science background since GCSE. They do not discriminate against you at the moment (all subject to future change of course). You will need to do well in the UKCAT and have good vocational/voluntary experience with caring outside of the family.

If you're willing to learn it before getting in, then you could sit the GAMSAT which is no mean feat, but possible. It's a 5 hour exam essentially on English Language & the three sciences and basic maths. It's hard but people do learn it from scratch with no prior A-level experience in science. You could apply to various schools with this, have a look here at the different schools and check which ones accept the GAMSAT: http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Students.../Graduate.aspx

There are other schools that will accept you so long as you have a chemistry component to your degree (e.g. a biochemistry module). Barts will accept you, for example, if you've covered chemistry at degree level even if not at A-level.

Finally I'd like to point something out. Don't do a degree with the sole intention of doing medicine afterwards, unless you're sure you'd be happy working in that profession if you're unsuccessful. The future of graduate-entry medicine is uncertain and there are no guarantees you will continue to get funding for 4 year courses (if they still exist!) in three years time. I hope it will still be around, but don't get your hopes up.

If there are any other avenues open to you (e.g. resits or taking up A-level chemistry before applying) then I recommend you do that.
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Brownclown
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(Original post by MJK91)

Finally I'd like to point something out. Don't do a degree with the sole intention of doing medicine afterwards, unless you're sure you'd be happy working in that profession if you're unsuccessful. The future of graduate-entry medicine is uncertain and there are no guarantees you will continue to get funding for 4 year courses (if they still exist!) in three years time. I hope it will still be around, but don't get your hopes up.

If there are any other avenues open to you (e.g. resits or taking up A-level chemistry before applying) then I recommend you do that.
This was soul crushing

The only reason I'd do biomed/bio/anything related is to specifically do GEM. Biomed has appalling career prospects with little pay
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OU#50
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(Original post by Brownclown)
This was soul crushing

The only reason I'd do biomed/bio/anything related is to specifically do GEM. Biomed has appalling career prospects with little pay
There is talk of the 4year GEM being phased out. This is Leicesters last year for GEM entry and I have heard I think of one of the London Unis phasing it out too. Something to do with the GMC I think. You can still apply to do medicine but may have to consider the 5 year course which you will have to self fund.
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Brownclown
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(Original post by OU#50)
There is talk of the 4year GEM being phased out. This is Leicesters last year for GEM entry and I have heard I think of one of the London Unis phasing it out too. Something to do with the GMC I think. You can still apply to do medicine but may have to consider the 5 year course which you will have to self fund.
I know about that. It was imperial who scrapped their 4yr grad and replaced it with A 5year one. The massive flaw in that was you get no funding for that course either. So unless you can afford £20k a year (living costs in London + tuition) that 5 yr course is pointless
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OU#50
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(Original post by Brownclown)
I know about that. It was imperial who scrapped their 4yr grad and replaced it with A 5year one. The massive flaw in that was you get no funding for that course either. So unless you can afford £20k a year (living costs in London + tuition) that 5 yr course is pointless
You wont get any funding for any second undergraduate degree (apart from a maintenance loan). You could consider applying to join the armed forces. They have a bursary scheme that would pay a lump sum each year after year 2 (about 10 grand I think) then a lump sum of approx 45 grand when you finish your army medic training) You would join as an officer and have to spend 8 years in the army, Not bad pay - good experience and an army pension!! Might be worth looking into
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OU#50
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(Original post by katy456)
What if I didnt have a level chemistry? I don't need it for biomed but will it stop me from doing medicine in the future?
This is from the Newcastle A101 graduate entry admissions site "Please note: A Level and GCSE results for graduate applicants will have no direct bearing on the decision to interview or offer a place. This also applies for Masters qualifications."
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Brachioradialis
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(Original post by Brownclown)
This was soul crushing
The only reason I'd do biomed/bio/anything related is to specifically do GEM. Biomed has appalling career prospects with little pay
I wouldn't say that's the case. If you do an accredited course and get your portfolio done, you can earn anything up to £40k within ten years. That's roughly equivalent to what you'd be on after the same time doing GEM. There is room for further earnings depending on what you do exactly as a career. You could lecture part time, or move into research, or work in the pharmaceutical industry.

Being a BMS doesn't mean you have to spend your entire life in a crap job in a dark lab room. There are loads of jobs you can move into.

Finally, you kind of made my point. Whilst future earnings is an important part of a career choice, I'd argue enjoyment and quality of life are more important. Working in research can be great; stressful at times but also quite laid back at other times. If financial incentive is your primary motive for studying graduate-entry medicine I'd suggest you'd be better of doing something legal or financial.
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