Feraligatr
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Okay, I'm in Year 12 and considering studying Chemistry at university. I'm not exactly sure as to what degree to consider doing though since I'm leaning on the research side of Chemistry than the industrial side of Chemistry.

If I want to go into research (within Chemistry), would you recommend doing a normal MSci (attached to BSc) or an MChem or alternatively for the sake of experiencing industry, a BSc with an Industrial Year Placement.

Also would it be better doing a BSc with an Industrial Year Placement or an MChem with an Industrial Year Placement as provided by a few universities including Bath?

Any advice would be much appreciated
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Nymthae
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(Original post by Feraligatr)
Okay, I'm in Year 12 and considering studying Chemistry at university. I'm not exactly sure as to what degree to consider doing though since I'm leaning on the research side of Chemistry than the industrial side of Chemistry.

If I want to go into research (within Chemistry), would you recommend doing a normal MSci (attached to BSc) or an MChem or alternatively for the sake of experiencing industry, a BSc with an Industrial Year Placement.

Also would it be better doing a BSc with an Industrial Year Placement or an MChem with an Industrial Year Placement as provided by a few universities including Bath?

Any advice would be much appreciated
MChem with YINI is your best bet. Why? The MChem means you will be able to go straight from your undergraduate to a PhD - makes life easier as it's all covered by student finance as with your first few years, and it will give you a direct flavour of working with PhD students and what academic research is like. The MSci is a better course, in my opinion, as it will specialise you more, but it's difficult to say what funding will be like when you come to it as currently it's far better to just do an MChem than take out additional loans. I know lots of students who will be graduating with an MChem who are going onto PhDs so they are very suited to that. The exception is perhaps if you want to go work abroad in Europe or so, at a Master's level as they don't equate an MChem to an MSci entirely, as far as I know, but in the UK in terms of opportunity they're pretty much the same.

I'd recommend doing the YINI because at this point everything can change. Chances are if you want to do research you'll probably do a PhD regardless, but having a year in industry will give you more options if you've had enough of straight studying and want to earn some money. You can do research in industry, if you go on for the PhD, and sometimes via an MChem if you stick around a company doing development work. It may give you a completely different insight: you might love it, you might hate it, you might learn about an area you'd never even heard of, you'll no doubt make great contacts either way. Also, you get paid, so I used that to cover most costs of final year.

I got several job offers within a period of 2 weeks. That year in industry was very valuable. I've gone back into industry because I loved my year out, and found the academic environment too petty. I'd had enough after 4 years of it all. I'm officially starting as an R&D Chemist in a couple of weeks.

You can always switch down to a BSc later if you decide chemistry isn't for you, but it risks being more difficult and sometimes not possible to switch the other way. You can change up until the end of second year usually so don't stress too much about it.

MChem YINI > MChem > BSc YINI > BSc for your current thoughts, personally.
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Feraligatr
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(Original post by Nymthae)
MChem with YINI is your best bet. Why? The MChem means you will be able to go straight from your undergraduate to a PhD - makes life easier as it's all covered by student finance as with your first few years, and it will give you a direct flavour of working with PhD students and what academic research is like. The MSci is a better course, in my opinion, as it will specialise you more, but it's difficult to say what funding will be like when you come to it as currently it's far better to just do an MChem than take out additional loans. I know lots of students who will be graduating with an MChem who are going onto PhDs so they are very suited to that. The exception is perhaps if you want to go work abroad in Europe or so, at a Master's level as they don't equate an MChem to an MSci entirely, as far as I know, but in the UK in terms of opportunity they're pretty much the same.

I'd recommend doing the YINI because at this point everything can change. Chances are if you want to do research you'll probably do a PhD regardless, but having a year in industry will give you more options if you've had enough of straight studying and want to earn some money. You can do research in industry, if you go on for the PhD, and sometimes via an MChem if you stick around a company doing development work. It may give you a completely different insight: you might love it, you might hate it, you might learn about an area you'd never even heard of, you'll no doubt make great contacts either way. Also, you get paid, so I used that to cover most costs of final year.

I got several job offers within a period of 2 weeks. That year in industry was very valuable. I've gone back into industry because I loved my year out, and found the academic environment too petty. I'd had enough after 4 years of it all. I'm officially starting as an R&D Chemist in a couple of weeks.

You can always switch down to a BSc later if you decide chemistry isn't for you, but it risks being more difficult and sometimes not possible to switch the other way. You can change up until the end of second year usually so don't stress too much about it.

MChem YINI > MChem > BSc YINI > BSc for your current thoughts, personally.
Thank you so much :cookie:

Imperial offers an MSci YINI however I can't apply for that so that option is out of the window. I've been looking at Bath, Sussex, UCL, King's, QMUL and Loughborough and in all honesty, I feel most pulled for King's, Bath and Loughborough, Fingers crossed, I can move out of London to study at university but if I can't, I guess QMUL's BSc YINI should hopefully do.

Once again, thank you so much :jumphug:
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InadequateJusticex
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(Original post by Nymthae)
MChem with YINI is your best bet. Why? The MChem means you will be able to go straight from your undergraduate to a PhD - makes life easier as it's all covered by student finance as with your first few years, and it will give you a direct flavour of working with PhD students and what academic research is like. The MSci is a better course, in my opinion, as it will specialise you more, but it's difficult to say what funding will be like when you come to it as currently it's far better to just do an MChem than take out additional loans. I know lots of students who will be graduating with an MChem who are going onto PhDs so they are very suited to that. The exception is perhaps if you want to go work abroad in Europe or so, at a Master's level as they don't equate an MChem to an MSci entirely, as far as I know, but in the UK in terms of opportunity they're pretty much the same.

I'd recommend doing the YINI because at this point everything can change. Chances are if you want to do research you'll probably do a PhD regardless, but having a year in industry will give you more options if you've had enough of straight studying and want to earn some money. You can do research in industry, if you go on for the PhD, and sometimes via an MChem if you stick around a company doing development work. It may give you a completely different insight: you might love it, you might hate it, you might learn about an area you'd never even heard of, you'll no doubt make great contacts either way. Also, you get paid, so I used that to cover most costs of final year.

I got several job offers within a period of 2 weeks. That year in industry was very valuable. I've gone back into industry because I loved my year out, and found the academic environment too petty. I'd had enough after 4 years of it all. I'm officially starting as an R&D Chemist in a couple of weeks.

You can always switch down to a BSc later if you decide chemistry isn't for you, but it risks being more difficult and sometimes not possible to switch the other way. You can change up until the end of second year usually so don't stress too much about it.

MChem YINI > MChem > BSc YINI > BSc for your current thoughts, personally.
Can you elaborate on the difference between MSci and MChem? Source? And congrats on the job offers!
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