humpas
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I'm going to start with the Open Uni in October studying Psychology, however, I've become more and more interested in studying the source of human behaviour and nature through it's origins in the brain. I got a great book called The Synaptic Self that explains everything from what a neuron is to Hebbian plasticity. Hence why months ago I started to feel perhaps I would be better suited to studying a natural sciences degree focusing on biology, chemistry, investigating the senses and mental health. With this broad range of study I thought I'd be well equipped to focusing on how our brains create who we are.

However, now I'm having second thoughts again because I realised that whilst I find how the brain works to be very interesting and progressive to a greater understanding of ourselves, there are two issues I have with studying natural sciences;

1/ A career in psychology would involve working with people, being focused on people, which is a big plus to me. A girl doing her masters at Newcastle Uni told me she found all the other experiments her fellow students were doing boring because they're all stuck in labs staring at slices of brain, or making chemical reactions, whilst she gets to meet people through her experiment. I can completely empathise with this. I'm a complete extrovert which is why I quit a job of three years in the NHS administration with more pay to go work in sales and retail because I felt totally drained by the admin work, whereas, now I sometimes secretly don't want to leave work because I feel that energised being up and about bouncing off customers and tasking all day. So I'm a little afraid of where one degree might lead me. You can find the subject matter incredibly interesting but the day to day work boring. I'm aware of this and don't want to spend years studying to work towards a career where I'm back to feeling completely unstimulated.

2/ There's only 60 credits focused on the workings of the brain in the natural sciences degree and what if the psychology degree also covers the brain? I can't seem to find enough information on the degree content so I thought I'd ask and hopefully someone who's doing psychology could answer. Is there a lot of focus on the biological origins of behaviour?

My fear of doing Psychology instead of Natural Sciences is that It might not teach me anything about the brain, it's processes and how it works. I don't believe anyone can truly understand human nature without reference to it's origins in the brain but Psychology is the study and observation of behaviour not the brain itself.
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Snufkin
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Here are the degree structures for the Natural Sciences and Psychology degrees. You can click individual modules for more information on them. If you can't study exactly what you want on a named degree, consider doing an Open degree instead. That way you can pick and choose modules from various disciplines. You could for instance do half Psychology and half Biology, or follow the Psychology curriculum but replace one or two modules with natural science modules.
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mkap
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(Original post by Snufkin)
Here are the degree structures for the Natural Sciences and Psychology degrees. You can click individual modules for more information on them. If you can't study exactly what you want on a named degree, consider doing an Open degree instead. That way you can pick and choose modules from various disciplines. You could for instance do half Psychology and half Biology, or follow the Psychology curriculum but replace one or two modules with natural science modules.
do you have the degree structure for health sciences?
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Snufkin
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(Original post by mkap)
do you have the degree structure for health sciences?
Click here.
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empiricspirit
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There is very little biology at the Open University's Psychology BSC course. They teach you the bare minimum they have to be BPS accredited. The curriculum change a bit from what I had to go through. But they did have a dedicated 30 credit module about the brain. It didn't have an exam. Just an extended essay. You won't be a 'brain expert' after it.

Health Sciences might be a good choice for you. It has more biological modules and you can pick psychology modules for it too. If you don't want to work as a psychologist (and trust me, that's boring too) I would choose that one.
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