Would it be alright to create clones of humans to experiment on biologically?

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Trounced
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#1
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#1
If science were able to say clone you. And your clone would be capaple of moving around and following instructions, but possesed no conscious thought, emotions or personal identity, would it be human/alive or would it simply be a 'meat computer' that would be 'ok' to experiment on in replacement of human/animal subjects. Does the fact it resembles a person overide the fact it doesnt possess any of the traits that we decide makes us human. For example the clone could be rewired to not feel pain for example, or it could detect the presence of a sensation we would attribute to pain without the negative feedback. Like a human body with a modern computer program for a brain.
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WarIntNorth
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#2
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#2
No, stop trying to play god. This could only end very badly.
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UmarA
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#3
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Humans are in a sense the consciousness in a body of meat so if the clones arent capable of thought i guess it would be the same as cloning an organ
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WarIntNorth
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(Original post by UmarA)
Humans are in a sense the consciousness in a body of meat so if the clones arent capable of thought i guess it would be the same as cloning an organ
No, one's body is one's temple; the body is intrinsically linked with the self, it is sacred and should not be desecrated as would be the case with creating human-clones.
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russellsteapot
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#5
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#5
Not sure I'd be that bothered if I'm honest. I'm sure there are philosophical and spiritual arguments against it but the (biologically unlikely) scenario you describe would make the clone little more than a fancy lab-grown collection of body parts. That kind of cloning would be fantastic for research, although it could probably be done just as well without making a full human body.
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UmarA
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(Original post by russellsteapot)
Not sure I'd be that bothered if I'm honest. I'm sure there are philosophical and spiritual arguments against it but the (biologically unlikely) scenario you describe would make the clone little more than a fancy lab-grown collection of body parts. That kind of cloning would be fantastic for research, although it could probably be done just as well without making a full human body.
+1 to that
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viddy9
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Trounced)
If science were able to say clone you. And your clone would be capaple of moving around and following instructions, but possesed no conscious thought, emotions or personal identity, would it be human/alive or would it simply be a 'meat computer' that would be 'ok' to experiment on in replacement of human/animal subjects. Does the fact it resembles a person overide the fact it doesnt possess any of the traits that we decide makes us human. For example the clone could be rewired to not feel pain for example, or it could detect the presence of a sensation we would attribute to pain without the negative feedback. Like a human body with a modern computer program for a brain.
It would be justifiable and praiseworthy to grow humans which lacked the capacity to feel pain and suffer and was not self-aware, and experiment on them.

It would be superior to experimenting on human prisoners and suicidal people, which in turn is superior to experimenting on nonhuman animals.
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Cloudnell
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#8
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#8
WTF! No way Clones can replace humans.. things will just go way bizzare..
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kkboyk
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#9
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(Original post by UmarA)
Humans are in a sense the consciousness in a body of meat so if the clones arent capable of thought i guess it would be the same as cloning an organ
Would that mean people in vegetative state are not human anymore?
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Kanairee
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#10
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#10
Personally I don't think you could ever create something with the purpose of having it react like a human without needing certain human qualities, otherwise there'd be no point to its existence. While it may only be capable of taking instructions, you would have to accept that it would have to be, in some sense, alive and therefore the creator would be responsible for the quality of its life. If it is used solely for the purposes of experimentation, then regardless of its awareness of what you are doing to it, it is inhumane. A person creating a living being solely for these purpose has no right to do so, I don't think anything like it would ever end well.
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willock
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Trounced)
If science were able to say clone you. And your clone would be capaple of moving around and following instructions, but possesed no conscious thought, emotions or personal identity, would it be human/alive or would it simply be a 'meat computer' that would be 'ok' to experiment on in replacement of human/animal subjects. Does the fact it resembles a person overide the fact it doesnt possess any of the traits that we decide makes us human. For example the clone could be rewired to not feel pain for example, or it could detect the presence of a sensation we would attribute to pain without the negative feedback. Like a human body with a modern computer program for a brain.
If they were created minus brains i don't see a problem but it would still seem very strange
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Arbolus
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Trounced)
If science were able to say clone you. And your clone would be capaple of moving around and following instructions, but possesed no conscious thought, emotions or personal identity, would it be human/alive or would it simply be a 'meat computer' that would be 'ok' to experiment on in replacement of human/animal subjects. Does the fact it resembles a person overide the fact it doesnt possess any of the traits that we decide makes us human. For example the clone could be rewired to not feel pain for example, or it could detect the presence of a sensation we would attribute to pain without the negative feedback. Like a human body with a modern computer program for a brain.
Before this question can be answered, another needs to be considered. Is there any moral difference between a clone who is incapable of conscious thought, and a human conceived and born naturally who is incapable of conscious thought? It seems to me that, in the absence of a very good reason otherwise, the answer by default has to be no.

The answer to your question, then, is the same as the answer to whether or not it's acceptable to experiment on any other person in a vegetative state. And, rightly or wrongly, society has decided that it's not.

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