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    (Original post by Weejimmie)
    "I hate theory" is a theoretical position...
    Indeed. I've never been Deconstructed before...

    Though I meant 'theory' as the general label given to postmodern cultural criticism. I just couldn't bring myself to capitalise the word.

    I doubt any Theorist could turn out such a succinct and communicative sentence...
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    (Original post by Werther)
    Indeed. I've never been Deconstructed before...

    Though I meant 'theory' as the general label given to postmodern cultural criticism. I just couldn't bring myself to capitalise the word.

    I doubt any Theorist could turn out such a succinct and communicative sentence...

    Literature is driving me and the class insane. One morning (ok we do the subject before school so we get a spare lesson) our teacher didnt show up and we were all pissed becuase we could have slept in. So we all go down and are sitting and chatting and then we end up deconstructing a poster saying "Sick of Crows? Put your rubbish in the bin" using Post-Colonial critisism. AHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!
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    (Original post by Everdawn)
    Literature is driving me and the class insane. One morning (ok we do the subject before school so we get a spare lesson) our teacher didnt show up and we were all pissed becuase we could have slept in. So we all go down and are sitting and chatting and then we end up deconstructing a poster saying "Sick of Crows? Put your rubbish in the bin" using Post-Colonial critisism. AHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!
    hahaha, what an awesome poster! Sick of crows. Oh dear.
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    Also along similarly pseudo-postmodern signs... I saw one saying "refuse to be put in the bin".

    I thought it was a powerful statement in defence of individuality, a proclamation against the generic.


    ........Anyway, it was asking me to put my apple remains in the rubbish.

    Please may I have the honour of put UKL LitSoc in my sig? I am hopefully off to Cambridge to study Eng Lit.

    Adam
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    As was the infamous sign put up by the Slough city council:
    "No road beyond the graveyard"
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    Personally I like the saying..

    "Don't be a sheep."

    If you don't understand... please ask.
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    any1 read "Vernon God Little" by DBC Pierre? excellent..
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    Oh my goodness, I finally got through my paper on "literariness!" though it almost killed me! :eek:
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    Fill in the ending that pops into your head.. and you can make it as long as you want.

    If you want to be somebody, if you want to go somewhere, you'd better....
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    after reading 'Enduring Love', I am keen to read more of McEwan's work- what do ya'll suggest? which is your fave mcewan novel & why?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Grifter)
    after reading 'Enduring Love', I am keen to read more of McEwan's work- what do ya'll suggest? which is your fave mcewan novel & why?

    Thanks
    Well, 'Enduring Love' is my favourite of his novels, just because I thought it was well written and kept surprising you throughout.

    I also liked 'Atonement'. 'The Cement Garden' is pretty good too. I found 'The Child In Time' and 'Black Dogs' much harder to get into, while the collections of short stories are kind of dark/ freaky
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    (Original post by Grifter)
    after reading 'Enduring Love', I am keen to read more of McEwan's work- what do ya'll suggest? which is your fave mcewan novel & why?

    Thanks
    Atonement is compelling (despite a slow start), but I would have to say Black Dogs is my favourite McEwan novel, mainly because it is one of his deepest / most philosophical.
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    (Original post by Grifter)
    any1 read "Vernon God Little" by DBC Pierre? excellent..
    Unfortunately, I have read it. I regretted it though. In my opinion, a first person narrative is not an excuse for negligible grammar and copious obscenities. I can not think of a single reason why it won the Man Booker, except perhaps watered-down judging. It may 'deal with contemporary issues' or what-have-you, but I believe that the Booker exists to reward accomplished literature, and that includes the quality of writing.

    The previous year's Life of Pi was exceptional, though, and so have been most winners for the prize's history. Perhaps Vernon God Little was an exception. At least, I hope it isn't indicative of what the future holds for British literature.
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    Has anyone else noticed the decline in standards in grammar throughout the advertising industry? Or is it just pedants like me?

    I remember an American sign advertising a film that read, "Denzel Washington literally sets the screen on fire" - now that I would like to see.
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    Like that movie title, The Prince and Me ...it always annoys me.
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    (Original post by Mr White)
    In my opinion, a first person narrative is not an excuse for negligible grammar and copious obscenities.
    Haven't read "Vernon God LIttle", so I can't judge that book. However, as a generalisation you are mistaken here. A first person narrative reflects the narrator and if they are ungrammatical and obscene that's what you get. W H Auden may have made Caliban talk like Henry James but that was a joke.
    One masterpiece of negligible grammar and decayed English is Ridley Walker by Russell Hoban.
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    [QUOTE=Weejimmie]Haven't read "Vernon God LIttle", so I can't judge that book. However, as a generalisation you are mistaken here. A first person narrative reflects the narrator and if they are ungrammatical and obscene that's what you get.QUOTE]

    Actually, you are making a generalisation about first-person narrative; not all first person narratives directly reflect the narrator and authorial perspective. They could be 'character's' themselves, and not a reflection of their views or natural writing style. Narratives should be read in context of what the book is suggesting or exploring.
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    (Original post by Specialheffa)
    Actually, you are making a generalisation about first-person narrative; not all first person narratives directly reflect the narrator and authorial perspective. They could be 'character's' themselves, and not a reflection of their views or natural writing style. Narratives should be read in context of what the book is suggesting or exploring.
    What makes you think that any fictional first person narrative will directly reflect the authorial perspective? Of course they represent a character imagined by the author. I didn't say they didn't.
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    (Original post by Weejimmie)
    What makes you think that any fictional first person narrative will directly reflect the authorial perspective? Of course they represent a character imagined by the author. I didn't say they didn't.
    Well explain what you mean by "reflects the narrator"? What of the narrator does it reflect?
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    (Original post by Specialheffa)
    Well explain what you mean by "reflects the narrator"? What of the narrator does it reflect?
    The narrator of a first-person narrative is a character imagined- invented, if you prefer- by the novelist. I'll leave aside debate about the reality of character as i hold an old-fashioned view of it. The narrator of a novel- as Vladimir Nabokov said about Humbert Humbert- is not an alter ego or a wish-fulfilment on the author's part but an imagined "person" who thinks and narrates accordingly. The narrative and the idiom of the narrative, reflect the narrator, not the novelist,
 
 
 
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