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Scared my doctor won't take me seriously watch

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    I'm a 20 year old female, just finished my second year at university.

    I've been researching online and think I might suffer from social anxiety. I'm thinking about talking to my GP about. If I got diagnosed with it, I'd be interested in CBT to try to improve it.

    However, I'm apprehensive about going to a doctor about it because I'm scared I won't get taken seriously, and I have no idea what to expect. I'm quite bad at explaining myself.

    Also, say I do get diagnosed with it... will I have to declare it to future employers? Or my current university?

    Thanks in advance for any help!
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    I can't promise that a doctor will take you seriously, but SA is a real medical condition so any good doctor should listen and try to help. If you're worried you won't be able to explain properly have you considered perhaps writing everything down? Even just bullet points then you can either read it or hand it to the doc - at least then you won't forget anything, which can be common if you're anxious. You don't need to declare SA to future employers or your university or, tbh, anyone. It's entirely up to you. If you declare it they can make adjustments for you, but it's your choice.

    I was diagnosed with SA a couple of years ago and recently have been having CBT so if you have any questions; ask away.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    However, I'm apprehensive about going to a doctor about it because I'm scared I won't get taken seriously, and I have no idea what to expect. I'm quite bad at explaining myself.
    surely one of the few advantages of social anxiety disorder is that your GP won't expect that you'll breeze into the surgery and fluently gab about what a rotten old pain in the bum bum it is.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Also, say I do get diagnosed with it... will I have to declare it to future employers? Or my current university?
    Thanks in advance for any help!
    You don't need to declare it to either but I'd recommend that you at least let your university know. If the anxiety is severe enough to make you think about going to the GP, I'm going to guess that it's having a significant impact on your life and therefore probably your work. I don't know how helpful your university's disability department is but they may be able to provide you with support if you declare the issue - the absolute worst case scenario is that they don't help you (which is unlikely) but even then it's not causing any actual harm. I can't think of any way you'd be worse off by declaring it to the university, it's in their interest to help you.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I can't promise that a doctor will take you seriously, but SA is a real medical condition so any good doctor should listen and try to help. If you're worried you won't be able to explain properly have you considered perhaps writing everything down? Even just bullet points then you can either read it or hand it to the doc - at least then you won't forget anything, which can be common if you're anxious. You don't need to declare SA to future employers or your university or, tbh, anyone. It's entirely up to you. If you declare it they can make adjustments for you, but it's your choice.

    I was diagnosed with SA a couple of years ago and recently have been having CBT so if you have any questions; ask away.

    Good luck!
    The bullet points idea is really good - I think I'll do that. Also, that's a relief about getting to keep it private.

    What kind of stuff does the doctor ask you?

    Also, I have a few questions regarding CBT if that's okay Have you seen any improvement? How long does it go on for (individual sessions, and the thing as a whole)? Is there a massive waiting list for it? How would it work whilst being at uni - I wouldn't exactly be able to go back home every week for a session.

    Thanks so much for the reply - it's nice to be able to talk to someone who has experience with all this!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    The bullet points idea is really good - I think I'll do that. Also, that's a relief about getting to keep it private.

    What kind of stuff does the doctor ask you?

    Also, I have a few questions regarding CBT if that's okay Have you seen any improvement? How long does it go on for (individual sessions, and the thing as a whole)? Is there a massive waiting list for it? How would it work whilst being at uni - I wouldn't exactly be able to go back home every week for a session.

    Thanks so much for the reply - it's nice to be able to talk to someone who has experience with all this!
    From what I remember when I saw a doctor about it, he asked a lot about physical symptoms that I experience but also the thought processes behind my anxiety and asked for examples of things I found particularly difficult/anxiety-inducing.

    I've actually seen 2 psychologists for CBT. The first was pretty useless, I saw him for a few months but we never really got anywhere. The second has been awesome. I've seen her perhaps 6 times so far (once a week for an hour at a time) and already I'm doing things I never dreamed of being able to do. It's pretty great. Whether you click with the psychologist as well as their individual approach can make a huge difference to your outcome. Generally CBT aims to look at irrational thoughts and replace them with rational ones, and rational ones aren't half as scary

    In my experience of the UK mental health system, you could be waiting quite a long time for CBT. I've known people to wait many months. There's a new-ish initiative called improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) which aims to give people CBT much faster however this is often restricted to a small number of sessions. IAPT isn't available in all areas yet as far as I know. If you're returning to university in September, I'd probably say to try and get on the waiting list there rather than at home - just because of the going home weekly thing being a pain, plus they might want you to see other people possibly.


    You haven't mentioned this in your OP, but medication can also be used to treat social anxiety. Benzos, such as valium, are extremely addictive so not really suitable but SSRI antidepressants can help some people. These would need to be taken everyday to see any effect. Another thing is a beta-blocker like propranolol which you can take when you have to do something anxiety-inducing, these are good at covering up physical symptoms of anxiety, which, in theory, makes you feel calmer. Just thought I'd mention medication in case you hadn't considered it.




    Boy this turned out rather long, sorry!
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    You don't need to declare it to either but I'd recommend that you at least let your university know. If the anxiety is severe enough to make you think about going to the GP, I'm going to guess that it's having a significant impact on your life and therefore probably your work. I don't know how helpful your university's disability department is but they may be able to provide you with support if you declare the issue - the absolute worst case scenario is that they don't help you (which is unlikely) but even then it's not causing any actual harm. I can't think of any way you'd be worse off by declaring it to the university, it's in their interest to help you.
    Thanks for the reply! In that case I probably will tell my university then, if I do get diagnosed. What kind of support would they be able to provide?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm a 20 year old female, just finished my second year at university.

    I've been researching online and think I might suffer from social anxiety. I'm thinking about talking to my GP about. If I got diagnosed with it, I'd be interested in CBT to try to improve it.

    However, I'm apprehensive about going to a doctor about it because I'm scared I won't get taken seriously, and I have no idea what to expect. I'm quite bad at explaining myself.

    Also, say I do get diagnosed with it... will I have to declare it to future employers? Or my current university?

    Thanks in advance for any help!
    If you have social anxiety symptoms I am sure the uni would have noticed this in the interview. SA is a serious condition (which I also suspect I suffer from) but should not affect your work unless you are challenged this way in your work. If you trust your GP and they are a good doctor then they will listen and possibly refer you. You will get taken seriously and you can always get a second opinion.

    Don't worry about it? Talk to your GP and if you are diagnosed then work at it. If you have any more questions regarding your symptoms than PM me and I will try to help. Good luck
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks for the reply! In that case I probably will tell my university then, if I do get diagnosed. What kind of support would they be able to provide?
    Depends on what you need. Your university will definitely have some kind of a counseling service and they will almost certainly be able to give you some time regardless of whether you're formally diagnosed or not, so you'll be able to discuss coping strategies or things like that. If you are formally diagnosed with a mental health disorder then it is possible you'll be able to get funding for more intensive support, e.g. special access arrangements or more extensive counselling if they think that would benefit you.
 
 
 
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