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    (Original post by missaphrodite)
    Ah, I have a B at GCSE!
    'Stats without Tears'?? Oh how I need that book!
    Numbers= tears as far as I'm concerned lol. But I love psychology oh so much
    Meh, you're one up on me then!
    Yes, see if you can find a copy, it doesn't make any bones about it being a bare essentials guide but it is very readable and interesting - as far as I'm concerned that's a good start!
    We shall have to prove our dedication to psychology with tears from the stats side I feel :yep: :sad:
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    (Original post by kiss_me_now9)
    Meh, you're one up on me then!
    Yes, see if you can find a copy, it doesn't make any bones about it being a bare essentials guide but it is very readable and interesting - as far as I'm concerned that's a good start!
    We shall have to prove our dedication to psychology with tears from the stats side I feel :yep: :sad:
    Haha. Good luck to us! :woo:
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    Wow, very surprised that I was the last person to post here...is the society dying?

    I have lots and lots of questions about what to put in my personal statement, but many have been ignored. I have looked at the example ones, but really none of their content applies to me...
    I do have one really big question though. If I'm applying for psychology with a view to becoming a Clinical Psychologist, can I explain the reason that I want to do it?- this is that I suffered (but am largely recovered now) with depression and anxiety, and my psychologist is pretty much my role model because she helped me so much; basically turned my life around by just speaking to me.
    Would this be something good which 'sets me apart' from the rest, or something that puts universities off if they get the impression that I won't be able to 'cope'?
    Let me know if you think there's anywhere better for me to post this, too
    (I don't really want to start my statement until I know the answer to this question, so I can't post in Personal Statement help yet).
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    (Original post by missaphrodite)
    Wow, very surprised that I was the last person to post here...is the society dying?

    I have lots and lots of questions about what to put in my personal statement, but many have been ignored. I have looked at the example ones, but really none of their content applies to me...
    I do have one really big question though. If I'm applying for psychology with a view to becoming a Clinical Psychologist, can I explain the reason that I want to do it?- this is that I suffered (but am largely recovered now) with depression and anxiety, and my psychologist is pretty much my role model because she helped me so much; basically turned my life around by just speaking to me.
    Would this be something good which 'sets me apart' from the rest, or something that puts universities off if they get the impression that I won't be able to 'cope'?
    Let me know if you think there's anywhere better for me to post this, too
    (I don't really want to start my statement until I know the answer to this question, so I can't post in Personal Statement help yet).
    To be honest, I wouldn't touch that reason with a 10 foot barge pole. It would make you seem like a liability and possibly unable to cope at university. I really wouldn't put this in your personal statement. You're supposed to be selling yourself here.

    Secondly, I would be warey of mentioning that you want to be a Clinical Psych. This might imply that you're only going to be paying attention in the clinical lectures (which make up a very very tiny percentage of Psychology) and not pay attention in the others. Plus you also have another 3 years to decide things like that; it's good to remain open minded. I know I wanted to be a Clinical Psych and I changed my mind within months of starting the course. Plus it might make you sound like all of the other ten million Psych students who "wana be a clinicul psychologost lolz".
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    (Original post by missaphrodite)
    Wow, very surprised that I was the last person to post here...is the society dying?

    I have lots and lots of questions about what to put in my personal statement, but many have been ignored. I have looked at the example ones, but really none of their content applies to me...
    I do have one really big question though. If I'm applying for psychology with a view to becoming a Clinical Psychologist, can I explain the reason that I want to do it?- this is that I suffered (but am largely recovered now) with depression and anxiety, and my psychologist is pretty much my role model because she helped me so much; basically turned my life around by just speaking to me.
    Would this be something good which 'sets me apart' from the rest, or something that puts universities off if they get the impression that I won't be able to 'cope'?
    Let me know if you think there's anywhere better for me to post this, too
    (I don't really want to start my statement until I know the answer to this question, so I can't post in Personal Statement help yet).
    How much conviction is there behind that reason?
    Personally I'd put that sort of information in. While being a common reason, it'll be less common than psychology students going into the subject because they don't know what else to do. It's a good additional reason to studying the subject along with the I'm studying it because I love psychology idea.

    I wrote that I wanted to become an educational psychologist in my personal statement and was told by PS helpers that this would be a bad idea. I'm assuming it's for reasons similar to what GodspeedGehenna mentioned but I think that overall it's a good idea. Why? From my perspective, Yes, it's true that a person may change their direction within the field and so it might seem like a waste of a line. However at the same time it shows direction in life and generally those with a destination are seen in a better light than those who aren't entirely sure. They'll be seen with better conviction to do well since their future is at stake. The whole depressional recovery thing only furthers this as well.

    Having said all that!

    It's important that you show that you know what you are getting into. As mentioned, alot of students go into psychologist thinking perhaps they'll go into the clinical profession, and not realise that it'll take an additional 3-4 years before becoming chartered. Basically if you are going to go with the whole "I know what I'm doing theme" it'll be a good idea to prove that somehow by backing it up with evidence. You'll be gearing your personal statement in one particular direction. Understanding cognitive problems of society, wanting to help and examples of doing so... etc.

    Regarding the last problem of clinical psychology being way too specific. This problem can be gotten around by giving it a more general idea... social and ognitive behavioural problems and neurochemical problems etc.

    The only thing with the whole depressional thing is. Maybe you don't want to be so direct with it, but it might be useful idea to imply that it had occured but you have recovered from it since then.

    I know I wanted to be a Clinical Psych and I changed my mind within months of starting the course. Plus it might make you sound like all of the other ten million Psych students who "wana be a clinicul psychologost lolz".
    Well I know you certainly researched everything up so it's abit unfortunate to go into something and suddenly realise it's not for you. Mind me asking what was your reasons for wanting to go into the profession and why it suddenly changed?

    I mean... it does still sound like you are going into that field, but clinical psychology is too narrow in comparison to biology and medicine?
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    Well I know you certainly researched everything up so it's abit unfortunate to go into something and suddenly realise it's not for you. Mind me asking what was your reasons for wanting to go into the profession and why it suddenly changed?

    I mean... it does still sound like you are going into that field, but clinical psychology is too narrow in comparison to biology and medicine?
    The more I studied the subject, the more disappointed I became with it. I also wrongly decided to study it based on my interests in clinical psych and neuro psych. I couldn't really put up with the rest of psychology as I found it far too woolly. I was also annoyed by the mass extrapolations made with the research presented to me, which was delivered in an "all answering" way, but consistently failed to deliver on examination of their methodology and the results they produced. (Speaking generally, here.)

    It's just a terribly frustrating subject to study if more rigorous and concrete sciences appeal to you. Luckily for me, I was able to incorporate a lot of modules from the biosciences department and have been able to tailor my degree to include a lot of neuroscience. I was put off further by the complete mess that is the disclipline of mental health (i.e.Psychology/Psychiatry), an increasingly medicalized area in which practitioners can barely agree with each other on diagnosis/treatment and with a very dissatisfied client/patient base. Again, I'm also put off further by the fact that Clinical Psychologists are being pushed away from client based contact and more towards management of services, as well as a rather uncertain future as the government decides Clinical Psychs are too expensive to produce when they can produce "CBT Counsellors" much cheaper and faster. I'm also disappointed in how many Psych graduates are being churned out every year by the swelling departments across the country (i.e. statistics like "At Bangor, 1 in 3 students is a Psych student" ). While this may on the face of it appear to be a good thing, I just find it very devaluing for the degree itself. If you look at the UCAS stats, Psych is one of the most studied subjects at higher education. The graduate market is being over populated with Psych grads. Competition for jobs in the area is just stupid for what its worth.

    Essentially, my original reasons to go into Clinical Psychology/Medicine are very similar. A fundamental love for empirical science at a deep level which can be directly applied to improve the lives of others. Unfortunately it seemed as though Clinical Psych failed to offer this as much as medicine does, hence I changed my career direction.
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    My personal statement is making me cry, lol. It's awful atm!
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    To be honest, I wouldn't touch that reason with a 10 foot barge pole. It would make you seem like a liability and possibly unable to cope at university. I really wouldn't put this in your personal statement. You're supposed to be selling yourself here.

    Secondly, I would be warey of mentioning that you want to be a Clinical Psych. This might imply that you're only going to be paying attention in the clinical lectures (which make up a very very tiny percentage of Psychology) and not pay attention in the others. Plus you also have another 3 years to decide things like that; it's good to remain open minded. I know I wanted to be a Clinical Psych and I changed my mind within months of starting the course. Plus it might make you sound like all of the other ten million Psych students who "wana be a clinicul psychologost lolz".

    Well, now I'm completely stuck...
    that IS my reason for going into it, so I'm going to have to lie :confused:
    At the end of the day I've suffered from these things and someone somewhere is going to find out, so am I not supposed to go to university or what? My psychologist told me that she suffered from depression I think it was in her late teens, but she certainly never got asked whether she had or not. I can sell myself all I like but at the end of the day, I have panic attacks, but I'm not going to hide away in my room for the rest of my life. I want to help other people.
    Well, I have done my research and I know that it's going to take extra years and a doctorate, and that's what I want to do. I can't see myself changing my mind, but I'm really confused now because I was always told you should be explicit about why you're doing the subject, and what the next step is going to be for you. I was going to explain that I'm choosing BPS accredited courses for this reason. I'm obviously going to keep an open mind and pay attention to all of the lectures etc. Surely it's better than saying you have no idea what you want to do afterwards, or that you want to go into the police or something?

    The other thing is, we're constantly told to 'stand out from the crowd' and people always have these interesting stories about why they were drawn to psychology, like they helped autistic children or watched their younger siblings grow up (see example statments...) but I don't have any of that...I just have the true reason I want to do the degree and likewise why I chose the A-level. Otherwise it's just going to be something like "Psychology is awesome. I studied it at A-level and I want to carry on. I can also play flute. I have great leadership skills".
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    (Original post by missaphrodite)
    Well, now I'm completely stuck...
    that IS my reason for going into it, so I'm going to have to lie :confused:
    At the end of the day I've suffered from these things and someone somewhere is going to find out, so am I not supposed to go to university or what? My psychologist told me that she suffered from depression I think it was in her late teens, but she certainly never got asked whether she had or not. I can sell myself all I like but at the end of the day, I have panic attacks, but I'm not going to hide away in my room for the rest of my life. I want to help other people.
    Well, I have done my research and I know that it's going to take extra years and a doctorate, and that's what I want to do. I can't see myself changing my mind, but I'm really confused now because I was always told you should be explicit about why you're doing the subject, and what the next step is going to be for you. I was going to explain that I'm choosing BPS accredited courses for this reason. I'm obviously going to keep an open mind and pay attention to all of the lectures etc. Surely it's better than saying you have no idea what you want to do afterwards, or that you want to go into the police or something?

    The other thing is, we're constantly told to 'stand out from the crowd' and people always have these interesting stories about why they were drawn to psychology, like they helped autistic children or watched their younger siblings grow up (see example statments...) but I don't have any of that...I just have the true reason I want to do the degree and likewise why I chose the A-level. Otherwise it's just going to be something like "Psychology is awesome. I studied it at A-level and I want to carry on. I can also play flute. I have great leadership skills".
    Run with it imo. Besides it's possible at the end of the day universities care mostly about grades and capability the subject. I'm of the opinion the more motivation and passion the better, however personal statement checkers will encourage more understanding of the course. At one point I ended up feeling like I was just listing theories and friends mentioned they didn't really like it much since it didn't say much about the person.

    You can link your other interests in with psychology. Mine was volunteering at school and being interested in ethics, this all linked to the idea of development of an individual. I'm sure you can combo things together
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    Run with it imo. Besides it's possible at the end of the day universities care mostly about grades and capability the subject. I'm of the opinion the more motivation and passion the better, however personal statement checkers will encourage more understanding of the course. At one point I ended up feeling like I was just listing theories and friends mentioned they didn't really like it much since it didn't say much about the person.

    You can link your other interests in with psychology. Mine was volunteering at school and being interested in ethics, this all linked to the idea of development of an individual. I'm sure you can combo things together
    Thank you, I'll bear all of that in mind.
    I do want it to be very much a 'personal' statement, but I don't want to put universities off because I'm a 'liability' :confused:
    I'm pretty much recovered now, off the meds, but don't unis have support systems and things if you have problems like mine anyway? Are people who have ever had anxiety not meant to go to university?:confused:
    Also, I was going to press the point that at one point I had agoraphobia to the extent that I couldn't get out of my room, nearly had to leave school and then basically turned my life around because I'm stubborn and determined :yes: ie, I'm not going to let it stop me going to uni.
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    Sorry guys, been away, uni work got in the way etc.

    Please welcome our newest members

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    (Original post by missaphrodite)
    x
    ps i've been away but I'd like to make a comment missaphrodite. (I'm one of the psych ps helpers on the site).
    If you'd like your ps looked at, please post it in the ps helping section. People will be able to look at it and give you more objective and helpful info.

    Secondly like GodSpeedGehenna has mentioned, you should not mention that you've suffered from depression. It's a bit corny and actually off-putting. If you refer to it as an educational experience or something that can help you with the course somehow then maybe it can be included, but I always tell people never to play the sympathy card. Also regarding mentioning that you want to be a clinical psychologist, I always advice people to put in areas they're interested in because it shows they've got focus and aren't just thinking of psychology wrongly, as in, 'armchair psychology'. It doesn't necessarily mean that's why you'll pay attention to, but it just means you're a bit focused than the next person.

    anyways, i haven't read through the posts properly as my internet time at the moment is limited but do post our ps in the helper section so I or one of the other helpers can look at it.

    (Original post by kiss_me_now9)
    x
    If you need help with your ps, post it in the helper section.
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    Wow, I had no idea this existed. Hello fellow psych lovers!

    Just finished my AS year and I will hopefully be applying to study psychology at university this September. Feeling a bizarre mixture of fear and excitement.

    Gonna request to join this society now, woohoo!
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    (Original post by Retrospect)
    Wow, I had no idea this existed. Hello fellow psych lovers!

    Just finished my AS year and I will hopefully be applying to study psychology at university this September. Feeling a bizarre mixture of fear and excitement.

    Gonna request to join this society now, woohoo!
    Lol, over these last few years I have learnt to live with that mix of fear and excitement :p: One false start for me, I'm just glad that I've figured out what I want now!
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    (Original post by kiss_me_now9)
    Lol, over these last few years I have learnt to live with that mix of fear and excitement :p: One false start for me, I'm just glad that I've figured out what I want now!
    Just looking at your sig it sounds like you have! It's great that you've finally found something you're happy with. Good luck!
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    (Original post by Retrospect)
    Just looking at your sig it sounds like you have! It's great that you've finally found something you're happy with. Good luck!
    I never do things simply, lol!
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    Ello ello!

    just decided recently that I want to pursue a career in psychology...I am starting it in september and looking forward to it!
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    Hello!
    Really looking forward to starting my psychology degree next month (and being a student member with a subscription to the psychologist magazine again after a year out - YAY! ONLY £21). Really hoping that I'll enjoy the course as much as I anticipate.
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    Wow I just looked and I joined this society as a founding member over 5 years ago :O so glad it's still going

    I'm pleased to say 5 years on I'm still loving psychology as much as ever and actually earn money from it. wooo!
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    Awesome stuff lou.
 
 
 
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